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j21896

HMS Mars by j21896 - Caldercraft (Modified Kit) - 1:64

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Hi Robert, as per our recent conversation,  I see that Mars was equipped with 6 pounder guns, as was Pegasus, so I can provide you with some details for those.
 

Fittings on the ship.
 

Breeching ringbolts in bulwark
These are 5”ø overall = to 2mm at scale.
I used Amati 2mm brass rings for this purpose clenched in a modified 2mm eyebolt; the eye reduced in size and squeezed around the ring.
 

Port Tackle eyebolts in Bulwark
2¾” ø overall
I used Amati fine 2mm copper eyebolts, reduced slightly in the size of the eye, and set above the Breeching ringbolt in the bulwark.
 

Training Tackle eyebolts in Bulwark
These were used when traversing the gun left or right
Same size as the Port Tackle eyebolts,
 

Relieving Tackle ringbolts – set in the deck opposite (or nearly) each gunport.
3⅞” overall diameter =1.54mm at scale. I used Amati 2mm brass rings for this purpose clenched in a  modified 2mm eyebolt; the eye reduced in size and squeezed around the ring.
Note: on Pegasus some of the larger stopper bolts do double service also acting as tackle bolts.
 

Fitting on the gun carriages.
 

Breeching ring bolts – 3⅞” overall diameter =1.54mm at scale.

I used Amati 2mm brass rings for this purpose clenched in a  modified 2mm eyebolt; the eye reduced in size and squeezed around the ring.
 

Gun tackle Loops - 2” overall ø = 0.8mm o/a
I used Amati fine 2mm copper eyebolts, reduced slightly in the size of the eye and countersunk a little in the carriage to look like loops rather than eyebolts.
 

Gun breeching rope
4” circumference - scaling to 0.50mm dia line.
This looked a little thin to my eye so I used 0.7mm diameter line.
 

Gun side tackles
The gun tackles were fitted with 1½” circumference rope which scales to 0.19mm ø line. I’ve used Morope 0.15mm ø line which is pretty close and provides a nice size contrast with the breechings.

 

Side tackle blocks
The blocks are around 6” = to 2.38mm. I used 2mm JB Pearwood blocks, but I reckon Chuck’s 3/32nd single blocks would be just about right.  

 

I see from your build log that you are using Chuck’s 12 pounder barrels masquerading for the six pounders. Six pounders did come in different lengths and I used RB 32mm guns for Pegasus.

 

I have examples of Chuck’s six pounder barrels and I also thought they looked a little undersized for Pegasus. The Twelve pounder barrels are very similar to RB’s 32mm in diameter, but are longer by 5mm, equating to a 7’ 9” barrel which is still within the six pounder range.

 

Twelve pounder guns incidentally had a breeching rope of 5½”  circ. (0.7mm) which is what I actually used on Pegasus.

The tackles were of 2½” line (0.3mm at scale) but I only used line half this thickness.

 

I provide the above as a guide, but as with all things items don’t always look right with direct scale reduction so let your eye be the final arbiter.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

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Absolutely superb work on the cannons Robert, carriages and barrels. With B.E's guide you can't go wrong and I'm looking forward to seeing the end result.

 

Cheers

Alistair

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Thank you so much B.E.!!!!  That is absolutely what I needed.

 

I'm not at all familiar with the Training Tackle.  I think I will omit those eyebolts.  I hope that isn't a huge issue.

 

One last question, as I will be making all of the eyes and rings from wire, are there rules for the diameter of the iron itself that was used in these fittings?

 

Thanks,

Robert

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Hi Robert,

 

The Training tackle eyebolts were introduced post 1779 and one was placed centrally between each port on the same line as the Port tackle eyebolts.

 

The diameter of the metal used in the ringbolts/eyebolts ranged between ½”  (loops on carriages)  ⅞" (Ringbolts) and 1" Breeching ringbolts/port tackle eyebolts. 0.2 - 0.4mm at scale.

 

The wire obviously needs to be robust enough not to pull out of shape when tackles are attached, the commercial stuff I used was of the order 0.4/0.5mm in diameter.

 

B.E.

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Those are terrific guns, Robert.  Your blackening (and matte) make them just right. 

 

Can't wait to see them on the carriages and on deck!

 

Martin

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Eyebolts

 

Not much time being spent in the shipyard of late, so progress has been extremely slow.  I thought I’d at least post a “micro-update” before the close of the year.  I made the carriage eyebolts using the guidelines provided by B.E., along with the suggestions for fabrication received here:

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/4308-in-need-of-tips-and-techniques-for-making-eyebolts/

 

 

Using 28 gauge copper wire, I chose to go with the "twist method" nicely illustrated by SpyGlass here:

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/3336-securing-eyebolts/page-2#entry107526

 

 

I followed that process, including use of the clothes peg, with one minor adjustment.  To free up a hand, after using the pliers to pull the ends of the wire through the hole in the clothes pin, I used a small clamp to hold them.  Straddling the legs of the clamp over the pliers as shown, prevented it from rotating while turning the drill bit in the eye (not shown).

 

post-130-0-07828800-1406329881_thumb.jpg

 

 

Time to motivate, and get these blackened and installed in the carriages!

 

Happy New Year to all.

 

Robert

Edited by j21896

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Thanks John.  Unfortunately I foolishly skipped an essential step in the process of making the gun carriages – a mistake for which I am now paying dearly with my time.

 

Before going about mass production of any scratch built items, it would obviously be a good idea to build a prototype!!  In building the gun carriages, I neglected to do that.  Instead, I just followed the plans, failing to consider that -- being plans for “after-market” carriages -- they may need some adjustment to fit my build!

 

I made all the components, built up all the carriages, got to the stage of adding the quoins and realized the height of the guns in the ports was going to be too high.  :o  At first I decided to continue on, and “live with it”, and I completed the carriages.  Then, I realized that I was dragging my heels on installing the ironwork because I could not live with it.

 

In any event, I drew up a few adjustments that I think are subtle enough to not throw off proportions relative to the gun barrels -- which are obviously not changing.  I built a prototype, and now I’m fabricating all new parts.  This is going to take a while longer.

 

I feel pretty stupid, but I think I’ll just chalk this one up to a bad case of “go fever” (to use a 1960’s Apollo program reference).

 

Robert

 

 

 

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Yeah, prototypes get important upon mass production.....saves some time....sometimes....sorry to hear about that....

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Sorry to hear about the setback Robert. I'll bet that's a lesson you won't forget in a hurry though! ;)

 

Good on you for your perseverance to get it right. I'm sure you will be very happy with the final result.

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Tough break, Robert.  But congrats on the effort to go back and redo it.

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Thanks guys.  Of course there is a bright side to all this.  The first go round I didn't have any HobbyMill cherry wide enough for the brackets, so I used inferior wood.  This time, I still don't have any HobbyMill stock large enough, BUT ...

 

Many, many moons ago, about when I first started this project, I was in a Rockler store and bought a piece of cherry wood sized 3" x 3/8" x 24".  I had no power tools at the time, so I really couldn't use it, but it was just such a beautiful piece of wood I grabbed it.  Well, in my search for lumber to start my second attempt at the carriages, I came across that long forgotton gem!

 

As Grant would say, I now have the chance to play with my toys (Byrnes thickness sander and table saw) some more -- and to use them much more extensively.  This time, I didn't have to glue up strips, I could in fact slot the profiles in a larger block of wood, then slice the brackets from that.  Also, I'm going to drill all the holes for the eyebolts BEFORE assembling the carriages this time.

 

Robert

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Sounds like this really was a blessing in disguise Robert! :)

 

That beautiful piece of a Cherry was "meant to be" for this project - you just needed to do some practice before cutting into the really good stuff.

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Good for you!  Sounds like things I've done.....buy a piece because it looks good.  Might take 30 years to use it --- but that makes it even better :)

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Hi Robert,

 

Just catching up, excellent work on the gun carriages and the blackening of your cannons turned out perfectly, hope to see you back at the shipyard my friend :)

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