molasses

Cruizer Class Plans (plus variants Snake & Favourite) at NMM

I was curious about the number of plans for the Cruizer class available at the National Maritime Museum. I found 79 plans of which 19 are downloadable (low resolution, 1280 pixels horizontal). Several of the plans show the changes to some of the Cruizers when refitted and rerigged as ships from 1815 through 1825.

 

The list has ship's names, date of drawing, NMM ID# and notes including which ones are downloadable at National Maritime Museum website. 

 

Cruizer Class Plans at NMM.pdf

 

While studying the downloadable plans I discovered a half deck plan including what appears to be the as-built disposition of the deck planks on the Cruizer-class Bellette of 1814. Very interesting. Click on the image for the full size version.

 

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Plan from NMM.

 

post-70-0-76426700-1396816279_thumb.jpg

 

I manipulated the image to bring out the lines of the sketched planks.

 

post-70-0-43300200-1396816283_thumb.jpg

 

I drew in the center and beam lines in red and then the planks in green. I evened the spacing of the planks compared to what was on the plan in a few places. Notice the taper in the planks both fore and aft of the beam line and the taper in the six center planks between the deck openings aft of about the Main mast.

thibaultron, druxey and mtaylor like this

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Plans showing the planking scheme are very rare. Well spotted! What you show here is what one would expect for that era, not parallel planking. However, it is interesting that the plank ends nearest the waterway are not hooked as was more usual.

 

The other interesting feature of this plan is the disposition of scarphs on the waterway, port side, and the bolt pattern.

 

Thanks for sharing this 'find'.

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Very sharp observation.  Do you know of any contemporary sail plans?

 

There are a couple of modern reconstructions (ZAZ4648, ZAZ4998) that the NMM says are "generally applicable" to the 18 gun brigs. They are pretty close to what you might calculate for yourself using the 1794 edition of Steel.

 

But I do not know of a single original sail plan or even  a numeric table of dimensions for the spars of a named Criuzer class brig.

 

And I find that amazing for almost a group that contains something near to 100 units. You would think that somewhere at least one set of numbers has survived.  There have been several threads about the Cruizers and I keep waiting for somebody to come up with one.

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 However, it is interesting that the plank ends nearest the waterway are not hooked as was more usual.

 

Perhaps I'm wrong, but it is my understanding that hooked deck planks were much more common on French and Dutch ships than on British ships and that planks were rarely hooked on smaller un-rated vessels. If I'm wrong please correct me.

 

 

Very sharp observation.  Do you know of any contemporary sail plans?

 

There are a couple of modern reconstructions (ZAZ4648, ZAZ4998) that the NMM says are "generally applicable" to the 18 gun brigs. They are pretty close to what you might calculate for yourself using the 1794 edition of Steel.

 

But I do not know of a single original sail plan or even  a numeric table of dimensions for the spars of a named Criuzer class brig.

 

And I find that amazing for almost a group that contains something near to 100 units. You would think that somewhere at least one set of numbers has survived.  There have been several threads about the Cruizers and I keep waiting for somebody to come up with one.

 

There is a generic sail plan for "Brigs, 2nd class," from ca 1836, in my list that mentions application to specific Cruizers, both brig and ship rigged, but I haven't seen it: NMM# DDS0018 initialed by William Symonds [surveyor of the Navy, 1832-1848]. Both the plans you mentioned are 20th century and are downloadable at the NMM website. ZAZ4648 has spar dimensions. I suspect that the drawings you mentioned were derived, at least in part, from DDS0018.

 

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ZAZ4648

 

Chapelle included, in an appendix in one of his books, contract documents for American Navy vessels in which mast and spar dimensions are specified. It's possible that Admiralty contract documents for Cruizers may have specified mast and spar dimensions but I have not seen any reports on research done in that direction. Most likely "established" dimensions (such as from Steel) were used and were not written down except as working notes.

 

HMS Epervier was surveyed by the US Navy when taken into US service after her capture and it's possible that mast and spar dimensions were recorded but I have not seen anything from this direction either. Petrejus in his book "Modeling the Brig-of-War Irene" (the captured Grasshopper of 1806) has mast and spar dimensions but I don't know where he got them - I haven't seen his book.

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The spar dimensions of the Irene/Grasshopper in the book are from her days in the Dutch service. The author has two drawings comparing them to a "typical" British rig but give no speciifics on how he has determined the British set. 

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Fore some reason I cant open your PDF. I have Acrobat reader XI and get the message that the file is incomplete or damaged...

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MSW2.0 had a minor memory failure of some sort a couple weeks ago; I just found that it lost several photos and the pdf in this topic. I'll re-posted them.

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Perhaps I'm wrong, but it is my understanding that hooked deck planks were much more common on French and Dutch ships than on British ships and that planks were rarely hooked on smaller un-rated vessels. If I'm wrong please correct me.

 

 

 

There is a generic sail plan for "Brigs, 2nd class," from ca 1836, in my list that mentions application to specific Cruizers, both brig and ship rigged, but I haven't seen it: NMM# DDS0018 initialed by William Symonds [surveyor of the Navy, 1832-1848]. Both the plans you mentioned are 20th century and are downloadable at the NMM website. ZAZ4648 has spar dimensions. I suspect that the drawings you mentioned were derived, at least in part, from DDS0018.

 

Chapelle included, in an appendix in one of his books, contract documents for American Navy vessels in which mast and spar dimensions are specified. It's possible that Admiralty contract documents for Cruizers may have specified mast and spar dimensions but I have not seen any reports on research done in that direction. Most likely "established" dimensions (such as from Steel) were used and were not written down except as working notes.

 

HMS Epervier was surveyed by the US Navy when taken into US service after her capture and it's possible that mast and spar dimensions were recorded but I have not seen anything from this direction either. Petrejus in his book "Modeling the Brig-of-War Irene" (the captured Grasshopper of 1806) has mast and spar dimensions but I don't know where he got them - I haven't seen his book.

 

Sorry about the necropost, but I was researching some Cruizer-class stuff and found mention of Fincham's Treastise on Masting Ships having a list of dimensions for two brigs that match the dimensions of the Cruizer and Cherokee classes. I recreated the table in Excel, only changing the titles "1st brig example" and "2nd brig example" to the class names they match. I found this in the Google Books copy of the 2nd edition of 1849.

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Canute, mtaylor, molasses and 2 others like this

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