Martin W

HMS FLY by Martin W - Victory Models - 1/64

373 posts in this topic

Thanks for looking in, guys.

 

Scott -- as Spy points out, I write memos to myself on the build where I can check and recheck quickly.  Most of what you can see are just identifications of which deck opening is for what.  I also tend to write the measurements right next to the object I want the dimensions of, so I won't lose them.  If you saw the clutter that I call my work bench, you'd know why I try to avoid losing anything.

 

Spy, I have in fact written:  pointy and square.  It's when I have to write Middle or Side that I'll begin to worry about myself!

 

:dancetl6:

 

Martin

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Thanks Martin, I can see your point.  Since the rattlesnake didn't have a sub deck I guess I wouldn't have done that.  I tend to put my notes on my plans and instructions.

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Scott -- enjoy those Rattlesnake plans while you can.  The Fly/Pegasus plans are not so detailed.  Fortunately there are historical plans, and the great benefit of some experienced and skilled builders keeping detailed logs on this site!

 

cheers,

 

Martin

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Thanks for the encouragement, Scott.  I hope whatever I do manage comes close to your expectations!

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Bulkheads:

 

The two bulkheads under the Quarterdeck are straightforward, especially when following the advice in FFM, to use thin plywood on which to apply veneers.  That's what I did, but still found the work surprisingly slow.  Cutting the ply from the template was a snap, as was gluing the veneers.  I had some 1/64" boxwood strips that I outlined with 1/64 cherry.  So far so easy.  For the doors, I used some 11/16 X 1/32 boxwood, that I also happened to have on hand, and they seemed to work quite well as scale representations.  Then I read David Antscherl's suggestion that louvers would be nice, and I looked admiringly at BE's louvered doors.  There was my challenge.

 

I had some very thin boxwood scrap from some trimming I'd done earlier, so I thought I'd use that for the louvers.  But the question was how to get louvers into the door so that they'd stay?  Now, I have a micro mill that I haven't figured out how to use yet, so I thought this might be a golden opportunity to put it to work.  After several hours of trying out different clamping methods and coming up with a small enough cutting bit (I settled on a micro burr that I use for carving with the Dremel), I ended up with this:

 

                                          post-1223-0-13393600-1406300079.jpg

             

                        Ouch!  Those are so ugly that any self-respecting crew would mutiny.  Lesson:  more practice, more thinking about how to use the mill, and where to get tiny end mills to cut something at this scale.

 

In the meantime, I cut some narrow strips of the boxwood veneer -- which gave me cleaner edges -- and simply glued them into the opening of the door at a somewhat appropriate angle.  I aimed at getting 4 louvers per door, but they proved so finnicky that I settled for three:

 

                                           post-1223-0-43716100-1406300568.jpg

 

Here, then, is the aft-most bulkhead with two of the louvered doors in place -- no knobs yet:

 

                                           post-1223-0-43903300-1406300665.jpg

 

The other two doors are not installed yet because they will be shown opening aft, and I didn't want to chance having them break off.  Through the doors you can see the first stages of furnishing the Cabin, with a walnut window seat.

 

You can also see that I've been experimenting with staining the bulkhead with walnut stain in hopes of not having to paint.  I'm far from satisfied with the result here.

 

For the second bulkhead, I decided to free myself from the burden of louvers, and just cut conventional panels on the doors, marking out the distances in pencil and then running an exacto point alongside a ruler, and then deepening the cut with a 1mm v-gouge. 

 

                                              post-1223-0-09840400-1406301015.jpg

In these photos my work looks as though I just dashed through the gouging, but in fact each door took around 45 minutes. 

 

Meanwhile, Bounce has been to a birthday party -- it wasn't hers, but she assumed the gift would be something she could eat. 

 

                                              post-1223-0-41235600-1406301196_thumb.jpg

                                       Oh, the outrage!

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Bulkhead fittings looking good Martin, but Bounce does look a tad disappointed, needs cheering up with a treat I think. :)

 

B.E.

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Thanks for that, BE.  I'm not completly happy with the bulkheads, particularly the doors, but can't think of how to improve them.

 

Not to worry about Bounce and treats.  If a treat exists, she has had it, and now expects it . . . demands it (she's a terrier, after all -- in the 14th century that classification was generally spelled terrour).

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hi Martin

I did one bulkhead at bulkhead 10 (it can be seen on page 4 in my log). I made it out cardboard which I washed with a pale yellow and then delineated the panels with narrow and thin strips of walnut. This made it quite easy to do. When the QD is on you can just see the bottom of the bulkhead. You can't see the windows that I put in the doors. I think when all the other details go on you won't be able to see it at all! So from that point of view I wouldn't loose too much sleep about it as a detail. I think what you've got will be just fine.

 

I just noticed that your gun port strips aren't on. I'm thought you had put them on or am I mixing up your log with someone else?

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Hi Alistair -- I've looked at your bulkheads quite often.  I even made pilasters along the style you used, but then found that they were much, much too large.

 

And you're right, I did put the gunport strip on, but worried that it was in the wrong place so I took it off.  Then I started thinking that I might have an easier time installing the hatches, bulkheads, etc etc without the strips, so I haven't put them back on yet.

 

Thanks for checking in, and thanks to others for the likes.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Just a couple of quick photos.  First is of the 2 lateral bulkheads with the fore & aft set in between.  I've added door knobs, which I made from the heads of little nails.  They look a touch large, but I couldn't think of anything smaller.

 

                                       post-1223-0-90811700-1406727968.jpg

 

Next is the ladderway.  As Spyglass has mentioned, this hatch is pretty narrow for a ladder.  This is a ladder from boxwood that I made using a jig Alan Yedlinsky describes.  I sanded the stringers down quite a bit to squeeze the ladder in.  It's all dry fitted for now.

 

                                       post-1223-0-94512700-1406728126.jpg

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Which hatch is that Martin - it looks a bit smaller athwartships than any of mine or is it just a demo fit ?

 

Good solid looking ladder!

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Hi Spy -- That's the foremost hatch on the Main Deck; I believe it's just aft of where the Forecastle will be.  I sized it just to fit the opening in the plywood.  If it looks too narrow, then perhaps coamings are too thick?

 

Thanks for checking in,

 

Martin

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Hi Martin,

 

the cabin bulkheads look great, a pitty they shall be not visible under the QD afterwards from outside

 

Nils

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Thanks Nils -- You're right about that.  But your own build has inspired all of us to think about the fine details of these beautiful ships.  Even if they're not visible, simply knowing they're there makes the build all the more enjoyable.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hi Martin

My fore ladder hatch is the same size as Spy's. Your ladder looks much better than the kit version - good move by you to remake it from scratch.

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Thanks for the compliment, Alistair, it's encouraging.  For the coamings, I cut down my boxwood stock to about 2.7 mm, which is notably thicker than yours and Spy's.  I'm not sure now how I came to that particular thickness, but this hatch would look better if it were thinner.  I might do another one this weekend.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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The summer is in full swing here on the prairie, so it's time to stay indoors, away from the biting insects and muggy heat, and cool off with some modelling.

 

The Capstan  -- Not surprisingly, FFM gives a good, detailed account of the parts to this piece.  One notable difference with the kit supplied capstan, is the number of whelps:  the lower capstan should have 5 whelps, and the upper capstan 6.  In reality this would necessitate a 10-sided barrel for the bottom capstan and a 12-sided version for the top.  FFM provides diagrams that can be traced and then glued onto the end of the stock to be cut for the appropriate part.  I don't feel the compulsion to detail my basic problems there -- they can be chalked up mostly to lack of skill -- but mostly it came down to trying to avoid butchering wood needlessly.  In the end, I opted for a round dowel that remained round.

 

For the whelps and trundleheads, I decided to use some heartwood.  I bought a chunk of this a while back for a few bucks, and wasn't sure what to expect.  It's truly red.  It isn't bad to work with, though does get a bit crumbly at times, as with this whelp:

 

                                      post-1223-0-15644700-1407791523.jpg

                              That piece is destined for the scrap bin.

 

Here are a few more successful versions, unsanded to show the natural color of the wood:

 

                                      post-1223-0-99936000-1407791594.jpg

 

And here is the lower capstan, in effect complete:

 

                                      post-1223-0-03668700-1407791646.jpg

Right now it's dry-fitted, just to judge its placement.  The dowel visible at the top will theoretically connect to the barrel of the upper capstan.

 

And, of course, the bulkhead here -- #9 I believe -- is totally in the way.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Nice work on the capstan Martin. The connection between it and the upper capstan cannot be seen when the QD goes on so I didn't even bother with it. Still I had to reduce the depth of the beam slightly to give it clearance over the lower capstan.

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Nice looking Capstan Martin, like your contrasting woods.

 

I did connect the two capstans on my build, it required cutting a  half round in the deck beam. It gave me a small pleasure but as Alistair says it makes no difference once the qd is in place. :)

 

B.E.

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Thanks for checking in, Alistair and BE -- and thanks for the encouraging words, they mean a lot from you guys.

 

I put the false deck of the QD in place last night, along with the beam & the top capstan.  From the look of it, a frightening large half round will have to come out of the beam, and it'll have to be raised substantially as well.  Cutting out that ply wont' be fun, and I'm even surprised it is so low, given that the kit's capstan is about the same size as mine.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Mike -- Thanks for checking in.  If you have access to a Woodcraft store around DC or No. Virginia, you might check out their wood selection.  That's where I got the heartwood.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Greetings -- Just a quick update.  Having finished the capstan, and contemplating the stove, I thought I might also replace the DREADED gunport strips that I'd removed due to concerns over their height.  I also thought it would be wise to follow the advice of those intrepid path breakers who are well advanced in their Fly/Pegasus builds, and use a sample gun to check the height of the ports.

 

Here's a curious detail.  I gather that the Pegasus kit has walnut or walnut-ply laser cut pieces for the carriages.  Other Fly kits might have as well; and mine has instructions for the laser-cut pieces, but is actually supplied with metal carriages that are, well, to put it delicately, unsightly.

 

I bought some guns & carriages from RB, and have read accounts of Chuck's guns.  Here's a comparison of the RB & the kit-supplied gun:

 

                                   post-1223-0-70472900-1408453153.jpg

 

The kit-supplied carriage is all one piece of molded metal.  There would be no way to fit the ring bolts.  The RB carriage, made of basswood, looks to be about the right dimensions, with the carriage sides (the brackets) at 1/4" high and 7/8" long.  The trucks, axletrees, and quoin are also supplied, but curiously no transom or anything else.  The trucks have that little post sticking out one side, so I assume the flat side would be glued to the axletree.

 

Not surprisingly, Chuck's site shows not only all the parts but also contains a nice PDF of instructions.  The gun barrels themselves also look more detailed.  And so . . . . I've placed an order, and await.

 

Of course, another option would be to fabricate my own carriages.  I'm not going anywhere, and the heat has set in on the southern plains, so there's time to think about this.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Thanks for sharing Martin.  I'm curious what you think about the RB guns versus Chuck's guns.  I think BE and Alistair concluded that the RB guns are probably perfect to scale, but it looked to me like Chuck's guns would be fine as well.  

 

Since you used the heartwood for the capstan, are you thinking about building the gun carriages out of heartwood as well?  I was hoping to avoid that, but if I'm going to use redheart for the bulwark planking, I don't know if I can stain the gun carriages to match the redheart and don't want different shades of red on my build.

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Well  the gun situation is a nuisance indeed.  I was VERY disappointed with the poor ply that the Pegasus carriages were made of-  I thought it just a waste of time to try and use them.  I looked at Chucks guns and others but I actually prefered the size odf the supplied guns - whether they are historical or not.

 

So I decided to use up the spare Fly carriages I had and managed to drill and fit bolts - not as difficult as I thought - though I agree not the same as Chucks lovely carriages but sufficent for me.  Trick is to centre punch the surface first - i used a needle set into a piece of scrap and then just a good quality bit in little hand screw drill with lots of lubricant - ie spit on it a lot !

 

 

post-905-0-89185700-1408458295_thumb.jpg

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Hi Guys, thanks for checking in.

 

Mike -- I am indeed considering using the heartwood.  It can be a bit crumbly, but I'm hoping that I can cut some pieces along the grain to give the carriages strength.  The practicum I followed for the Rattlesnake included a section on fabricating the brackets, and I have reviewed that a little while ago.  I think it just might be a possibility.

 

Spy --  That's a good looking carriage.  Is it the walnut ply?  I would have been tempted to use the ply if it had been in the kit, but those metal carriages aren't any good.

 

Right now, everything is still in the realm of possibility (except for the metal carriages).

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Hi Martin,

 

I used RB carriages for mine as well, together with the 32mm Long 6-pounder gunbarrels. The Pivot Point of the gun Barrel does not come too high with those, so they wo`nt foul the upper inner gunport opening edge

 

Nils

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