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HMS Victory by dafi - Heller - PLASTIC - To Victory and beyond ...

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thats looking so sweet great job that u are doing keep the pic comming wow wow wow  :dancetl6: p.c thats true master peace of work

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Fantastic Daniel!  I'm still wondering what is going to happen when you decide that there really is nothing else to do on the lower gun deck...surely this can't all get hidden?

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No words. It's not gettin boring to see your crazy mind***** stuff ;)

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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I'm sure that all this effort can be seen through the opening in the spar deck,  when you go topside........ :)      it looks very life-like....no two cannons are in the same position.......active realism.    nicely done!  ;)

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Ah... love it.  The realism, the mass confusion, the smell of gunpowder in the morning because it smells like Victory....  Incredibly wonderful work Daniel. 

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Daniel, I like these scenes where you have the figures involved. It gives us all a small sense of how things actually worked in a visual way. Please keep up with the excellent progress and detail.

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Hi Daniel

 

Thanks for the great pictures, they are so realistic. I watched a TV show of the HMS Victory and the death of Nelson last night, your pictures fit right in there, Enjoy.

 

Regards   Lawrence

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Sometimes, yes sometimes I hat me for what I am doing to myself ...

 

... example needed?

 

The worm hook to extract cartridge remains ...

 

... already I glued a nice long spiral onto a stick and just then looked into the literature ...

 

... bloody mental cinema ...

 

... it is not one long spiral but two short opposite spirals, which makes sense for the purpose.

 

First soldering trial with the 0,3 mm copper wires went bad until I remembered that there is a protection around :-(

 

Once removed, results became better, but still quite breakable, but then realised, the spiraling method does not work ...

 

... okokokokokoko ...

 

... back to start, rethink and resolder ...

 

800_Victory-guns_0857.jpg

 

... but how to do the double helix?

 

Took a fitting drill with the right lead ...

 

800_Victory-guns_0864.jpg

 

... and carefully embedded the wire into the grooves.

 

800_Victory-guns_0867.jpg

 

The lead still being too high, respaned the opposite way against a 1 mm mandral, and carefully readjusted the lead.

 

800_Victory-guns_0869.jpg

 

And here we are, it finally worked ...

 

800_Victory-guns_0874.jpg

 

... even fits for the bore :-)

 

800_Victory-guns_0871.jpg

 

 

That is why I sometimes hate myself, took me days to work this out until it fitted ...

 

... so I got really time enough to hate myself ...

 

... deeply contrited ... 

 

...yours dafi

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Dafi you really should hate yourself .. this is all so damn boring .... :D

 

Dirk

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... even fits for the bore :-)

 

Ofcourse, we would have been disappointed in your abilities if it did NOT fit the bore. :D  :D

 

Jan

Edited by amateur

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Hi Daniel

 

You are truly amazing, to take so much time on perfecting the tiniest details and making them work, Enjoy.

 

Regards   Lawrence 

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what comes to mind here...is all the little things that can get over looked.   you certainly fill in  the gaps ;)    I'm certain that this would not be left this way........would they tie cloth or burlap over this to create a swab?   I also would think that an oil would come into play here as well.....would it then also be dipped into a bucket to give lubrication?

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This worm stays as it is. Its purpose is to get powder cartridges out if the charge did not ignite (lovely job this must have been) or to regularly clean the bottom of the breech from possible remains of extinguished or even smoldering cartridges after a shot. That is why it needs hard and pointed ends.

 

The swabbing was done with a different swab, this possibly was fur and was used really wet, that is why a bucket with 9 parts water and one vinagre was always nearby. In my small diasplay you see the loader (known as number 4) is just inserting/retracting the swab, 9 tenths of the rod being outside of the hull ...

 

Cheers, Daniel

Edited by dafi

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hmmmmmm.......so,  they weren't concerned with scratching the bore.    considering how accurate they were........rifling the bore didn't come into play until much later in the munition's race.......cannons were more accurate than their cousins,  the mortar.

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Also if you look at all these strange things like bar shots, chains and so on, I do believe it was negligible what the worm did ...

 

... funny that those guns did not explode more often ...

 

... just now and then ...

 

XXXDAn

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hmmmmmm.......so,  they weren't concerned with scratching the bore.    considering how accurate they were........rifling the bore didn't come into play until much later in the munition's race.......cannons were more accurate than their cousins,  the mortar.

 

Would 'scratching' the bore of a cast iron cannon with a likely 'softer' wormer really be that much of a concern given all the other multitude of variables?  A cannon is about as low tech as it gets and other variables would likely have a much greater impact on accuracy (shot variations, wind, powder inconsistencies, small changes in the time taken to ignite the charge and the roll of the ship etc. etc. etc.)

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The worm that we use on our working 1812 era cannon is made from cast iron and the head looks like a spring.  The arms really do not scratch the bore of the cannon at all. The pitch of the helix is smaller than you have depicted. The 'arms' make more that 2 complete revolutions.  The sponge and rammer are on opposite ends of another pole.

 

In addition to unloading the gun the worm is used as part of the regular gun drill.  Here is the drill we use.  It was standard during the war of 1812

 

1.  "Search your piece"  The worm is inserted down the barrel and given several turns to snag any unburned wadding or cartridge left over from the last shot

2.  "Sponge your piece"  The wet sponge is run down the barrel to extinguish any burning embers

3.  "Search your piece" 

4.  "Sponge your piece"

5.  "Advance cartridge"  The cartridge is brought to the loader

6.  "Load cartridge"        The cartridge is inserted into the barrel and rammed home

7.  "Load with shot"       The round shot (or other shot)  is inserted into the barrel a wadding is inserted after and the shot rammed home

8.  "Prick and prime"     The gunner inserts the prick down the touch hole to pierce the cartridge bag and then fills the touch hole with powder.  A lead apron is the placed over the touch hole to protect the powder.

 

The gunner then sights the gun and the crew uses handspikes to train and elevate the weapon.

9.   "Make ready"        The gunner blows in the linstock to make sure it is burning well.  The apron is removed from the touch hole.

10.  "Fire"                   The gunner touchs the linstock to the touch hole.

Edited by popeye2sea

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What to do if one wants to play? One remembers old kids games :-)

 

So take a paper strip of exactemente 4,5 mm width ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0893.jpg

 

... folded once ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0894.jpg

 

... take a template to properly get the corner bent ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0895.jpg

 

... the second to come ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0896.jpg

 

... fold the lower part into the opposite way, shorten it and again bent around the corner ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0899.jpg

 

... prepared the other side ... 

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0900.jpg

 

... flattened ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0892.jpg

 

... opened and spread the opposite way ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0902.jpg

 

... already recognise it ??? 

 

Opened once more and ...

 

800_Victory_paperhat_0906.jpg

 

... and ready to be hatted :-)

 

Still have to send Lt. Williams to the hairdressers for that the chapeau sits to its designed location ...

 

...hihihihihihihihihi...

 

... sincerely yours, the dafi

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Ah... love it.  The realism, the mass confusion, the smell of gunpowder in the morning because it smells like Victory....  Incredibly wonderful work Daniel. 

is that the same effect as coffee

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Hi Daniel

 

Great looking tiny caps, they sure are a a lot nicer than those that I attempted a couple of months ago, Keep up the great work and the pictures coming,  Enjoy.

 

Regards   Lawrence

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