Dan Vad

How I fix Boo-Boos and Oopsies (Mistakes) by Dan Vadas - Share your own "Fixes" here

81 posts in this topic

During the course of building my Scratchbuilt model of HMS Vulture I've encountered some problems (don't we all :D ) so I thought I'd share some Tips on how I Fixed them.

 

There are three examples shown below - feel free to add your own "misadventures turned to masterpieces" below.

 

The first and most important "tool" when faced with an apparent catastrophe is the Right Attitude. Some would pick the model up and throw it against the wall, but that's not going to fix anything except a very short-term sense of frustration :huh:  .

 

Remember this point - 98% of Mistakes are YOUR OWN FAULT .... NOT THE MODEL'S. The exceptions are if a large truck or a hurricane demolishes half your workshop taking your ship with it - not much you could have done to prevent THAT :D . And don't blame the cat for jumping on the workbench either - what was it doing in there in the first place?? (EDIT - Yeah OK - THAT happened :D ).

 

Stay calm, sit down for a few minutes and think of a solution. Keep a positive attitude, convince yourself that ANYTHING CAN BE FIXED (because it CAN  :) ).

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

The first one is a fairly simple fix to a problem that many Builders, whether Kit or Scratch, Advanced Builder or Novice, can encounter at any time:

 

Gaps in Planking

 

There are quite a few reasons why you may get a gap or two in your planking - inexperience, not beveling or tapering correctly, a slipped clamp or pin, bad lighting (couldn't see it), rushing to finish it before going to work or wherever. I've been guilty of ALL of the above at times  :D .

 

The cause of this one : IMPATIENCE - I'd soaked the planks to get a slight lateral bend in them to follow the Waterway. I pinned them in place to dry out, but DIDN'T LEAVE THEM ALONE TO DRY THOROUGHLY before gluing them on.

 

They looked fine when I first glued them, but two days later the gaps appeared as the planks shrank back to normal size.

 

Who's fault? MINE

 

Here's how they looked before the "Fix" :

 

 

Gap 001.jpg

 

 

I wanted to leave the Caulking visible in the planking. Fortunately the caulking was done using an Archival Ink Pen on ONE edge of the planks only. If BOTH edges had been done this fix would not have worked very well - the gap would still have been apparent, only to a lesser extent.

 

The solution was simple enough. I sanded down a scrap of the same Castello timber used for the planking, mixed it with some diluted white PVA glue, forced it into the gap and let it dry thoroughly :

 

 

Gap 002.jpg

 

 

The next two pics show the results after sanding it, both before any finish was applied :

 

 

Gap 003.jpg

 

 

And after a coat of Minwax Poly :

 

 

Gap 004.jpg

 

 

 

Total Time taken to fix this : About 10 minutes (not counting time while the glue dried).

biltut, neptune, dewalt57 and 19 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Broken Knee of the Head

 

Cause : TAKING A SHORTCUT and FORGETFULNESS  - I'd been doing some work on the hull with it off the baseboard,  which was mounted to my Tilting Attachment. The ship is held by two supports fore and aft and is normally screwed to the  baseboard through the keel, but I only needed to do a few minutes work with it on the workbench before returning it to the baseboard so I didn't bother screwing it down.

 

I was distracted for a few minutes by a phone call and when I returned to the ship I'd forgotten it wasn't screwed to the board. Naturally enough, as soon as I tilted the board to get at a piece on the other side the model fell out of it's supports and  crashed to the floor, breaking the Knee of the Head.

 

Who's fault? MINE

 

Here's how she looked after the crash :

 

 

Oops 001.jpg

 

 

The Knee broke through only one piece, but (of course) it was the most difficult one to fix - The Lacing Piece.

 

First thing to do was drill a series of small holes through the Lacing Piece alongside the join with the Stem. This helped the Isopropyl Alcohol penetrate the timber close to the join :

 

 

Oops 005.jpg

 

 

 

Then it was time to get out the Isocol, fix a piece of gauze around the join and soak it thoroughly until it started to soften the glue. Carefully wedging the join apart helped speed the process :

 

 

Oops 004.jpg

 

 

Here's a pic of the broken Lacing Piece removed and the Stem cleaned up :

 

 

Oops 007.jpg

 

 

A new Lacing Piece was made and dry-fitted to the Stem and shaped until a perfect join was remade. The outer edge of it was left a fair bit oversize at this stage :

 

 

Oops 010.jpg

 

 

The undamaged Bobstay Piece and Cutwater were then fitted to the fore part of the Knee :

 

 

Oops 012.jpg

 

 

After a bit of sanding here is the result. No finish had been applied when this pic was taken :

 

 

Oops Fixed 004.jpg

 

 

Total Time taken to fix this : About 4 hours (not counting time while the glue dried).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warped Keel

 

 

This one went pretty close to ending the Build when I first discovered it. But with nothing to lose I figured I may as well try and fix it  :) .

 

 

The Cause : INEXPERIENCE - This is my first attempt at a Fully Framed model.

 

My intention for the Build was to Fully Plank one side and leave the other side Open, so when it came time to put the Fillers into the lower sections between the Frames I only did the Open side - the other side wouldn't have been seen at all.

 

What I SHOULD have done was fit them to BOTH sides, or at the least every 2nd one.

 

I didn't know it at the time, but PVA glue shrinks as it dries - especially so over such a large area. The shrinkage caused a warp in the keel of about 10mm in the middle. I'd been fitting all the Fillers with the hull upside-down and not on the baseboard. After I'd sanded them to shape I tried to remount it in the baseboard, but it wouldn't go on. That's when I discovered the problem :

 

 

Keel Deflection 002.jpg

 

 

To fix the problem I cut out two of the Fillers and the Ribands that were already fitted. I used wedges to force the keel back into shape, holding the top of the framing in line with a clamp. Then I glued two fillers into the Port side opposite the two I'd removed and let them dry THOROUGHLY :

 

 

Keel Deflection 007.jpg

 

Keel Deflection Repair 001.jpg

 

Keel Deflection Repair 002.jpg

 

 

Then I made two slightly larger Fillers and fitted them into the vacant slots :

 

 

Keel Deflection Repair 004.jpg

 

 

The Keel finished up perfectly straight :) . This pic was taken a long time after the initial incident.

 

 

Straight Keel.jpg

 

 

Total Time taken to fix this : About 6 hours (not counting time while the glue dried).

BANYAN, dafi, tasmanian and 14 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's mine, and I think it's might be reasonably common.

 

Broken Mast

 

Cause: Reaching across my partly rigged model of the Nautilus without thinking and catching the royal masthead on my sleave.

 

Who's Fault?: Mine, for being so careless and stupid - easpecially around delicate parts on a 1:96 model.

 

The masthead snapped off clean at the collar, leaving the already attached rigging just hanging.

 

post-5-0-96686800-1361943787.jpg

 

I had to strip off all the rigging for a start, then I carefully drilled a No.78 drill hole in each section of the mast and inserted a length of wire into the lower section, added some glue, and slipped the broken upper section back into place over the projecting wire - presto, just like a new one!

 

post-5-0-57679800-1361943974_thumb.jpg

 

With the rigging re-done, it  looks as though nothing has happened.

 

post-5-0-26464200-1361944161_thumb.jpg

 

Lesson Learned:  Be very aware of what you're doing and where your arms and clothing are going around a model - especially once the rigging is started.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in agreement.. attitude is everything.. along with a scrap box, isopropyl alcohol, and acetone.  (the Isopropyl for dissolving PVA and the acetone for CA).

 

I've messed up more on this scratchbuild than I care to admit and more than on my kits  and I won't overwhelm with pictures.  From mis-cutting frames to breaking the stem.  Some frames, I tossed.  Other frames, I shimmed since the hull will be completely planked.  I've replanked the lower deck, removed and repositioned all the furniture on the gundeck. Oh, did mention I've made almost every bit of furniture twice so far?  Gunports have been reset, clamps redone.  I"ve learned and it's been fun.

 

No one to blame but me.  I'm sure there will be other things. 

 

The most important thing I've learned... re-work until satisfied that's it's as good as you can do.  Then go one step further and try again.   She may not be perfect in other eyes when I'm done, but she'll be the best I can do in mine.  Of course, the next one will be better. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you gentlemen for the sage advice we can all use now and then.  Next time I have a lapse in consentration or make an error, I will stop and remember your words.  Of course thats after I turn the air blue with several 'explatives deleted'.   :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great thread,...I'll be on board soon enough.....with a few doosies (is that a word?)....... that I recall :huh:  

 

JP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my most adventurous fix. I had a frame on Blanche that was sitting too high on one side.

 

Cause: Setting up frames in a rush just before going out to dinner with the Admiral and not triple checking the alignment in every axis.

 

Who's fault: Well, I suspect the Admiral won't take the blame, so I admit, I was that soldier.

 

The Fix:

Rather than try and force it to align properly, I decided to replace one side of the frame.

 

To remove it, i first drilled a series of small holes with my pin vise vertically down through the floor of the frame, alongside the keel. This allowed me to use a small saw to cut the floor at that point and with the help of a fair bit of alcohol, remove that entire side of the frame. I then used a small mill cutter in my Dremel to clean up the cut alongside the keel.

 

Being lazy, and since the timbers above the floor were fine, I removed the remains of the floor from the frame, then made half a floor, to which the chock of the lowest futtock fit perfectly.

 

post-39-0-34383400-1362007005.jpg

 

This was then inserted into the gap to align correctly.

 

The result:

post-39-0-52645500-1362007003.jpg

 

Cheers

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan, I have to say this is one of the best threads I've seen on  a modeling forum. It reminds modelers that they are in control of their builds, and that no problem is insurmountable if one will just calm down, and give it the old critical thought process. Thanks for the reminder!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a great thread. When people ask me about the amount of time I spend on a model, I tell them 30% of my time is fixing  "aaah crap, why did I do that" items, but like others have said, it's just another way to learn. I've used the sawdust fix several times and I'm amazed how well it works.

 

I hope this thread grows with more examples, I suspect I'll need the help...  :)

Mick_S likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use clear dope instead of PVA glue it is specialy good for filling the gaps.

Dope is better because it has no effect on the wood dust color after drying, The other plus for clear dope is its sanding characteristic, you can sand it to a very smooth finish.

The downside is it is not that hard so if you use it for shallow dents, a normal sanding can just remove all of it from the surface

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This really is a great thread Dan.  Glad you started it.

 

As a relative newcomer, I make plenty of mistakes/oop's.  My latest catastrophe is detailed on my Syren log.  The problem is that when we look at the logs from you Top Gun guys and gals, we get the impression that everything goes perfectly.  This topic puts things in perspective, much like Briddoch's USS Constitution where he had a mishap transporting his lady.

 

The bottom line is that all on here share the same emotions as we move through a project.  And when the unthinkable happens to someone else on the Forum we at least try to lend support.

 

Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol - i believe this could be the most viewed topic in MSW 2-0 - brilliant idea 

it could be an ideal way of pointing to another thread on home made jigs - like setting gun port side - and another one that Dan showed of reversing the calipers to set the height of an item

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dan for starting this thread.

 

The fixes were outstanding. For a beginner like myself it is great to see how things can be fixed and reapired. Thanks to all who posted

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice thread! Nice idea! I can proudly say that I have a lot of this lol :D. But you can learn I lot from "oopsies", I think that is how you get the experience! The best thread ever I have to say again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well one of many of my oopses.

 

The problem: misalignment of the gunport stills

 

Cause: An impatient builder (me...) relying on a not so good jig instead of measuring from a fixed point

 

The fix: guts to take the frames out with isopropyl and start all over again.

 

post-20-0-66780100-1362606770_thumb.jpg

The pencil lines mark the correct hight

 

post-20-0-52476500-1362606910.jpg

 

post-20-0-72573400-1362606774.jpg

 

Remco

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a relatively new ship modeler I thought I was totally unskilled because of the errors I've made.  Thanks for showing me that mistakes are a part of the process.  I'll sleep better now!

 

Frank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A wise man learns from his misstakes. A genious learns from the misstakes of others.

I cant remember who said that but I love the thread.

Erik

 

Thats a great quote,

 

Cheers Phil,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. I like this thread also. I will learn a lot from the mistakes of others and myself. I will have to start recording all my boo boos also, but if I do that I won't get anything else done. :D  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the best thing I learned from this thread is that these mistakes are recoverable.  As I read thru them and saw the broken stem...My initial thoughts would have been scrap it and start over.  The warped keel would have stopped me in my tracks and i would have another unfinished project to add to my collection.  Thanks everyone that has shared.  This has given me hope that i can accomplish my next build and come back from mistakes that I will surely make.

Dan Vad and keelhauled like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found that the modeller has to be more creative in fixing the mistakes than he/she does in building the model in the first place.

NenadM, les101 and keelhauled like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is probably one of the most educational threads on the site. Thank you Dan, for letting it all hang out! You show how apparent total disasters can be rescued, which gives us all hope.

les101 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My latest oops was to rip the rope for the parrel trucks on one of the gaff jaws right out of the end of the gaff.  The fix I used is documented in my log here.

 

The damaged part looked like this after the mishap and before the fix:

 

post-547-0-22593100-1363273602_thumb.jpg

 

Bob

Elmer Cornish, dafi and keelhauled like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My most recent boo-boo (in a great lineage of ship modeling boo-boos):

 

problem: a fine cove scraped into a waist plank on my current schooner model.  The cove should run perfectly parallel to the edge of the plank.  The cove is ~ 1/32" wide and deep, is painted yellow, and is a subtle but visible decorative element to Gloucester fishing schooners.

 

cause: poorly executed scraping; probably a poorly executed scraping tool; and the builder not addressing the problem immediately, instead of waiting until the entire hull was complete and painted!

 

chosen solution: create a shallow depth cutting tool (which cuts to a shallow depth offset a given distance from the edge of the plank with the cove).  Use a chisel to remove remaining material.  Cut a custom sized replacement strip of wood, glue in place.  Sand flush to adjacent planks.  Apply putty/filler.  Sand smooth.  Apply primer.  Finish sand.  Then apply finish coat of yellow to the new wood, mask, and re-apply black hull paint.

 

link to build log page with egregious error and fixhttp://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/409-arethusa-by-elia-1907-knockabout-banks-fishing-schooner/page-4

 

Hopefully this will help others in their builds.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Misaligned Deck Clamp

 

Part-way through the deck framing of my HMS Vulture I fitted the Lower Deck Clamps and Spirketing. The height of the tops of the Clamps was taken from the NMM plans, allowing for the height of the Deck Beams, and marked using a height gauge. I forgot to allow for the beam heights when I measured the aft end, resulting in the clamps being 6" too high at the Transom. This mistake wasn't discovered until a long time later, although I always had the feeling that something wasn't quite right (the deck clamp SHOULD have finished 6" BELOW the top of the Wing Transom at the height shown by the red line) :

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 002.jpg

 

 

Fixing the problem on the open Starboard side was relatively easy - Isopropyl Alcohol soon softened the PVA and the aft section of the clamp could be removed, cleaned up and re-glued at the correct height.

 

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 001.jpg

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 008.jpg

 

 

The Port side was a different matter, as the Lower Clamp and Spirketting had been fitted. The top of the clamp needed to be cut down to the correct height - everything else was OK.

 

After marking out the correct height on the clamp I used an abrasive cut-off wheel in a Dremel tool (VERY CAREFULLY :huh:  ) to cut just above the line. A normal circular saw blade would have been far too aggressive and would have been impossible to use in this situation :

 

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 003.jpg

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 005.jpg

 

 

An Xacto knife and two Riffler Files completed the cleanup :

 

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 006.jpg

 

 

This pic shows the lower deck clamps after the Wing Transom Knees have been fitted :

 

Wing Transom Knees 001.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes, like a good strategist, it's better to beat a retreat. Repair can sometimes be a snare and delusion - at least for me. I've spent hours trying to mend a piece unsuccessfully, only to then scrap it. Cut to the chase and make a new piece instead. Chances are, the replacement will be better than the original and take less time to make.

keelhauled likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As my very senior neighbor once told me, "The difference between an amateur and a professional is that a professional knows how to correct his mistakes".

 

Great thread, thanks to all.

capnharv2 and keelhauled like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.