Dan Vad

How I fix Boo-Boos and Oopsies (Mistakes) by Dan Vadas - Share your own "Fixes" here

81 posts in this topic

I think this has to be one of the best tread on this site. This tread deals with mistake that we have all done at least once in our life and because of this tread we know of a way to fix them. I for one wish to thank Danny for sharing this tread It is one that a person should read more than once in his time of building of a ship. Thank you Danny.

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Three weeks ago I made one of the stupidest mistake in my modeling career. I get up to reach over to the shoebox which has all the rigging in and at the same time my shirt gets caught on the boat stand. In my movement the boat flew in an arc and fell on the concrete floor. AAAAARGH #$%^ @$%&*

 

Damage was serious. Jib broke off, sails and rigging tangled, flag masts broke off, main mast off by several degrees.

 

Put it back on the table and stared at it. Walked away and an hour later, re-attached the jib, attached the sail and completely re-did the rigging. Was too embarrassed to take pictures. While repairing it, I felt like the person that did something really bad and had to fix it before someone had a look at it.

 

In the end it looks like the original boat with some added innovations plus it is made of materials (wood, string, cloth, etc) that can easily be manipulated.

 

Learned lesson. Before I start modeling. Tuck in shirt, sleeves either buttoned up or wear t-shirt, NO lose hanging items from body and no sudden movements OR just model naked.

 

Marc

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Hello Marc,The Admiral suggested instead of naked wear a cup,as in hockey etc,also Kleenex handy for tear drops.glad you repaired it okay.

 loose clothing in many walks of causes accidents especially in industry,wishing you a good day.Edwin

flying_dutchman2 likes this

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Aaah! The trials, tribulations and joys of boat building. You can't duplicate the great feeling you get after you accomplish a major step on your boat.

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In my most recent post on my Terror build I didn't disclose that the prop you see is actually the second iteration. My first attempt resulted in a beautiful prop that was almost perfectly symmetrical.

 

However, the next day, when I soldered the inner shaft to the completed prop I forgot to add anti-flux to the solder points on the prop blades.

 

Of course, when I added heat the entire thing fell apart in a globby mess of solder. The prop I posted is the second build (same parts) - it's accurate and symmetrical, but just not as perfect as that first build. :(

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a great thread you opened Danny,

 

I can realy feel with your disappointment after recognizing that warped keel of your Vulture. Amazing and inspiring how you managed to fix that one (without a trace left)

 

Nils

Dan Vad and WackoWolf like this

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a great thread you opened Danny,

 

I can realy feel with your disappointment after recognizing that warped keel of your Vulture. Amazing and inspiring how you managed to fix that one (without a trace left)

 

Nils

 

Thank you Nils.

 

The "up" side of that blunder was to teach me to be a lot more aware of the same thing happening with a myriad of other "mini-projects". So far, so good - no repeats of warping :) .

 

:cheers:  Danny

Mirabell61 likes this

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Talk about an oops and I mentioned this already in my built. I made a colossal mistake on my frames. Glued all the frames together with all the top of the frames in a straight line. Then I looked at it....... Oh $%^&*. The area where the keel is going to be, is curved.

Think of looking at the bow on the right and slowly turn your head to the stern on the left. Follow the bottom where the keel is to be. The frames successively step down. So the stern is an inch lower than the bow.

 

Bought new wood and working on Version 2. But, I am going to attempt and I saw "Attempt" according to the way the Dutch built the ships. Unconventional. 1-Keel, 2-lower frames, 3-lower planking, add more frames and add more planking. So in reality the frames are in pieces in many places. There will not be a frame in one piece.

If you don't understand the above, not a problem. Will take many pictures and I may be able to search the NET on the subject.

Marc

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While rigging my Connie, I broke a line. Rather than replacing all of it including blocks etc, I decided to splice the line with a new section. 

Instead of a simple knot, I took one of the blocks, drilled the hole a bit bigger and inserted the new line section next to the old one. After I made sure the block was in the right place (proper tension on the line, etc), I put a drop of CA glue on the line right on top of the hole. When it was set I trimmed the two ends and the result is shown below.

post-246-0-51442500-1422901024_thumb.jpg

JesseLee, augie, Mirabell61 and 2 others like this

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Learned lesson. Before I start modeling. Tuck in shirt, sleeves either buttoned up or wear t-shirt, NO lose hanging items from body and no sudden movements OR just model naked.

 

Marc

Marc, in addition to tucking in shirts, don't have another glass of wine!!!

 

I believe there was another thread here about all of those 'don't do this and that' and the upshot was that another glass of wine leads to problems (more than the usual).

flying_dutchman2 likes this

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Marc, in addition to tucking in shirts, don't have another glass of wine!!!

 

I believe there was another thread here about all of those 'don't do this and that' and the upshot was that another glass of wine leads to problems (more than the usual).

I don't drink when I drive and I don't drink when I model.

Marc

mtaylor likes this

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Jay, I accidently cut a line on one of my yards a few weeks ago & I did the same thing. Hid it in a block.

BradW likes this

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Jay, I accidently cut a line on one of my yards a few weeks ago & I did the same thing. Hid it in a block.

Right on, Jesse. 

My fingers are lousy, my mind ok, but those breaks are the pits.

I also made splices that are hidden in the center of 'tops'. It just takes some judgments about where to make the splice and hope that no one will know except you.

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Great topic! Guess, I could add some fixes for clinker planking. My Titanic's lifeboat tought me something :-)

If anybody interested, I could show, how to fix a couple mistakes with clinker. It's a little tricky way of planking.

 

I still have one side of lifeboat to be fixed. Just need to make some photos

AON, tarbrush and 20legend like this

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Great topic! Guess, I could add some fixes for clinker planking. My Titanic's lifeboat tought me something :-)

If anybody interested, I could show, how to fix a couple mistakes with clinker. It's a little tricky way of planking.

 

I still have one side of lifeboat to be fixed. Just need to make some photos

Hi, any chance that you could still post this please. I'm on with my first build which is clinker planked (AL Providence whaleboat) and could use all the tips and guidance that I can lay my hands on...

 

Cheers.

AON likes this

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Thanks for these ideas. That broken mast especially. Looks exactly like my 1:96 Phantom after a move. I thought I had packed it carefully with peanuts and all. No joy when i opened it and found both top mast broken off and the rigging all awry. I had thought of the wire solution but not tried it yet. John's solution gives me confidence to go ahead and do it.

Walt

mtaylor and Canute like this

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I enjoy watching boat building/repairs on YouTube since models are miniature boat/ships. The concepts and approaches used can be applied to model construction by using appropriate sized tools and techniques. Here’s a YouTube video on replacing rotten planks/spicing which could be used in replacing a defective model plank. BTW have you noticed the grey hair on presenters?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ox93snKVuaM

Geek1945\Ed

mtaylor, Canute and AON like this

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I had my share of oops, on my Vic (almost finished last page of rigging 13&14) I was a little over my head on this one to begin with. My trials and tribulations were plenty, Start with warped decks out of the box, missing rigging line, and metal furnishings, cat knocked it over repaired, I broke off in succession tip of bowsprit, all tops of fore, main and mizzens at different times, had to drill and pin all main twice, redo rigging on 2,the worst was the ratlines when almost completed they looked really bad, it took me a week and support of all my MSW buddies  to finally take scissors and cut ALL SHROUDS and Ratlines and completely redo if I counted the knots and hours you would have seen a grown man cry.

 

Actually the bottom line with all your oopsies daisies from what everyone posted is perseverance and patience, patience , patience patience. I have never let anything beat me this one came close when tying ratline knot # 37,152. :10_1_10:

Joop-Ham, Canute, jud and 4 others like this

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