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JustBlowingInTheWind

What have you cooked today?

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And share the recipes!

 

Courtesy of Piet

 

Hello all y'all and hope everyone is doing okay?

 

Well, I had a hunkering for some more Indonesian food so I decided to make only three dishes.  I made a fish dish that originated from Palembang, a city on the island Sumatra.  It's called Mangut Ikan or Palembang fish in spicy coconut milk.

The people in Indonesia leave their fish hole as much as they can and I was lucky to get two orange roughies  of about 1.5 pounds each.  Gwen and I have enough fish for three meals.

 

I still had two packs of tofy and made a sweet / sour tofu dish from Central Java.  This one is called Bumbu Rujak Tahu or tofu in mixed spice sauce.  It also has coconut milk in it.

 

The ext dish is a veggie dish called Sambal Goreng Buntjies or spiced string beans.  It also has a lot of chopped tomatoes in it and looks very festive. 

 

Gwen made the white rice but I asked her to add three in it.  I crushed the seed first though, this gives the rice a nice subtle aroma.  It's not really done in Indonesia but I borrowed that method from India.  Gwen liked all of the dishes I made, which is a bonus  :) 

 

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Palembang fish in spiced coconut milk.  The sauce has onions, garlic, green and red bell peppers, chili peppers, 5 different spices and coconut milk.  I had to leave it rather mild in the chili part because Gwen's stomach can't handle it anymore.  But I added some on my plate.

 

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This is the tofu dish.  It too has several different spices, chili pepper, lemon grass and coconut milk.

 

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Spiced string beans.  As you can see it has plenty of tomatoes, I used the Roma tomatoes.  It has also several different spices, chili pepper, tamarind sauce and coconut milk. 

 

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Here are all three dishes together on top of the cooking thingy.  By the way, that natural stone back splash?  Gwen and I installed that when we moved into our new house.

 

Hope yuns enjoyed the meal  ;)

 

Cheers,

Edited by JustBlowinInTheWind
helmsman, Per, Elia and 7 others like this

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Admiral has a bad cold, so I made Chicken Veggie Soup with Rotini the other day.  Haven't had to cook since as it made about 1 and half gallons (in other words... a lot).

 

It's all day affair... some canned stock, 2 chickens (backs/bones/etc.). Hold the white meat and chunks of dark for later.  A potato, two carrots (shredded), celery, onions, spices and let it simmer all day (about 8 hours).  Then pour off the stock, toss out the bones, soggy meat and any veggie residue which if done properly, they will have all dissolved.  Drain off any fat from the stock and put back in stock pot.  Add the chicken meat after it comes to a boil.  When almost cooked, add fresh sliced carrots and celery.  5 minutes later, add rotini.  5 minutes after that, add frozen corn and peas.  If you like, add snap peas.  Recheck seasoning and serve.

Edited by mtaylor
GLakie, augie, Elia and 3 others like this

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   Don't laugh but I actually baked a cake. (The Admiral's still in the other room cracking up.) This is just my second attempt ever and it turned out pretty gruesome, if I do say so myself.  :huh: Hey! Thought I said no laughing.  I'm choosing to blame the recent earthquake for this cake's unfortunate state. 

   The up-side is, it still tastes good, once you get past the appearance.  :D

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Cheers  :cheers:

Edited by GLakie

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I frequently make this one. It's a play on the Italian Caprese Salad. Supposed to be a bed mozzarella, sliced tomatoes, with fresh basil and olive oil.

 

I call this the Crazy Sally. cheese, shredded prosciutto, lemon juice, (Breaks down the meat so it's not so chewy) tomatoe, basil and you should be able to find lemon infused olive oil. Sometimes I put it in with some Penne pasta.

 

Hint: Don't use shredded low fat skim milk cheese. You should be able to find a lump of whole milk cheese. It actually has flavor you don't have to wait to taste.

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Don't laugh but I actually baked a cake.

 

I was probably 10 years old when I made my first batch of brownies. (before I knew about pot.) Te recipe called for 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Thought it said 1/4 cup :(

GLakie likes this

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I made a berry pie today and the filling came out a weird pink color and it tasted just like yogurt. I didn't follow a recipe I just threw it together and don't know where I went wrong.

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I also made a mustard, brown sugar and pineapple glazed ham along with stuffing and mashed potatoes.

 

 

 

 

Lextin.

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Smoked and slow cooked a fowl, seasoned and  covered with bacon in my ketle BBQ grill. Cut the backbone out and lay them down flat over a pan of water, coals around the edge and not under the bird.

jud

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I cooked our Christmas lunch this year. Five courses. Because it is so hot in Australia at the moment, I tried to keep the meat to a minimum and serve mostly light vegetable dishes paired with white wines. So here we go: 

 

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1st Course: Red and black caviar, traditional service. Not pictured are the blinis which was what the caviar was served with. 

 

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2nd Course: White asparagus with 63 degree egg and Garrontxa cheese. The asparagus was sous-vided with some butter and salt for 15 minutes at 85C. The egg was SV'ed for an hour at 63C. Towards the last 15 minutes of cooking, the asparagus was added back in to reheat. 

 

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3rd Course: Flame-grilled fennel bulb with Gorgonzola, honey, and lemon. The title more or less tells you how it was cooked and what it tastes like. The intense herbiness of the fennel bulb is moderated by the cooking, the grilled bits add a bit of texture and bitterness, countered by the creaminess of the cheese and the sweetness of the honey. The lemon juice cuts through the dish and lightens it all. 

 

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4th Course: Turkey Torchon with truffles and summer vegetables, with Madeira Sauce. See the posts below for the turkey torchon. Madeira Sauce is normally beef stock with truffles and Madeira wine, but this time I used a turkey stock instead. For those who don't know, Madeira wine was discovered when Spanish ships returned to Spain after having crossed the equator. For a while, they made this wine by filling ships up with barrels of wine and sending them to cross the equator and return. They then realized that it was the combination of a cold climate grape with aging in oak barrels under hot conditions (instead of cold conditions that you would normally find in a cellar) that produced the result. 

 

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4th Course: Turkey breast roasted on the crown. Separating the dark leg meat from the white breast meat has one big advantage - you can cook them separately. The white meat needs to be cooked to 60C, whilst the dark meat should be cooked to 65C. This way I could optimally cook both types of meat. 

 

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4th Course: Triple Cooked Chips, as per Heston Blumenthal. 

 

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5th Course: Fresh fruit meringue with a berry coulis

 

--

 

For those interested in how to make the turkey torchon, this was how:

 

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First, separate the thigh from the turkey, then neatly debone it. Remove all the tendons and silver skin. You should be left with this. 

 

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On a square piece of caul fat, lay out the shaved truffle and sage, then place the meat on top. Slather on some truffle butter. 

 

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Use the caul fat to wrap the torchon tightly, then wrap in cling film. If you keep rolling the film, i will compress the torchon into a neat sausage, as above. Leave the torchon in the fridge overnight to set its shape. 

 

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The next day, wrap the turkey skin you removed from the legs around the torchon, and secure with needle and thread using interrupted sutures. Cook sous-vide for 5 hours at 60C, then CAREFULLY unwrap. The skin is really fragile at this point. Carefully pat dry, then deep fry at 180C until golden. 

 

 

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Can you do my ship modelling for me? :)                                                      

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Wow! The talent in this forum isn't limited to just ship modeling I guess.  :P

 

Cheers  :cheers:

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I am so glad that  found this tread

I received 2 books for Christmas

Yotam Ottolenghi  Jerusalem and

Kylie Kwongs Simple Chinese Cooking Class

I refer constantly to 2 food web sites for recipes

BBC Food  and The New York Times

So I am in to it  Tonight Mediterranean fish gratins

 

Regards

Ken

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If you keep rolling the film, i will compress the torchon into a neat sausage, as above. Leave the torchon in the fridge overnight to set its shape.

 I love the film idea! I make a chicken galantine, that gets rolled in cheese cloth. You tie the cloth at each end, grab one end to hold still while rolling away. Then do the same to the other side, back and forth until it's so tight it'll bounce.

 

Lotta fun! Take a whole chicken, remove legs and wings and completely de-bone so that you leave only the skin. You should end up with a skin you can lay down flat. (Use the carcass to make a stock) with the skin side up, salt and pepper liberally. Flip[ skin side down and spread a layer of ANYTHING you want on the inside of the skin. leave an inch of the skin exposed all the way around. I like to stuff it with a sage sausage, or a tarragon lamb. Wrap in the film, and roll it - but like I say, it has to be so firm it'll bounce. Poach it in a decent simmer until it reaches 68. Pull it and let it set for 15 minutes. Carry over cooking with bring it to 74. Normally it's refrigerated over night, sliced to around 2 cm and displayed for a banquet. I keep it hot and make a sauce from the chicken stock.

 

Alternatively you can tie and roast or smoke.

 

I serve it with a mild rice pilaf robert, Cinnamon candied asparagus goes great with the tarragon lamb. Rice pilaf robert can be found all over the internet. The asparagus is simple. Blanch the veggie, render the fat from some bacon, add enough sugar so that it's thick. You don't want a caramel, add cinnamon to taste, place the veggie in the fat/sugar and heat only, then garnish with the bacon.

 

See this to learn how to de-bone

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Piet, scratch, Amfibius and 1 other like this

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Hello to all you cooks out there

Can anyone give me a good recipe for a New York style

Reuben sandwich

 

Thanks in advance

 

Ken

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Thanks for that Crackers and especially Rhonda

I will definitely try the recipe. I assume 1/2 a pound is about 225 grams ?

My next big project is New Years Eve  Chinese style pork ribs

The marinade is all the usual ingredients Light Soy Red Wine Brown Sugar

Peanut Oil Sesame Oil Ginger and Garlic

Should be good !!

 

Regards

Ken

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I'm torturing myself looking at these delicious photos and descriptions, because today is one of my "fast days", where I limit myself to 600 calories. I'm following the "5:2" diet, very popular in the UK at the moment, where you fast for two days a week - not one after the other, say Mondays and Thursdays - and eat normally the other 5.

 

Although the inventor, Dr Michael Mosley, says that fasting has benefits of its own, most people (including George Osborne, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and I) just follow it as a way to lose weight. It works well for me - I have lost about 7 pounds since I started a couple of months ago - and however hungry I get on a fast day I console myself with the thought of hot buttered toast tomorrow morning!

 

Here's a link, if you're interested: http://thefastdiet.co.uk/

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Back in the 1980’s my wife decided to go back to school to get her master’s degree.  To help her I took over the kitchen and found out I liked to cook.  Now she is disabled so I still get to do all the cooking.  I consider myself a Zen cook.  That is, I rarely follow directions exactly.  The way it started was, I like onions and garlic, so I put in enough to taste.  My wife does not like thyme or rosemary so I leave those out.  I now see herbs and spices as being either pungent or mild and believe that any pungent spice can replace any other pungent spice and the same with the mild spices.  Also because of having to do all the housework and take care of her, I simplify the recipes as much as possible.   Alfredo sauce is equal parts by volume butter, cream cheese, freshly shredded parmesan cheese (which makes it fluffy not packed) with enough milk to get the right consistency and , oh yes, onion and garlic.  This goes over pasta or rice with crumbled ground beef, sautéed shrimp, chicken, sausage . . . you get the idea.  More later form the Zen cook.

 

Bob

Edited by Cap'n'Bob

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Hi Bob

I am the opposite of you

I have been a widower for 2.5 years now so I have had

to learn to cook !!

I was watching Rick Steins Indian food program a while ago

and had a lightbulb moment Heh  I could do that

So I bought his book and off I went making curries

But I obsessively follow the recipes measuring and weighing

So some the results have been quite good

And I am  now getting into Asian Mediterranean  and Middle Eastern food

 

Regards

Ken 

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I made a large (4.8 quart pan) chicken pot pie today. Despite all the odds against it (canned chicken, canned veggies and broth out of a box) it still managed to taste delicious.

 

 

 

 

Lextin.

Edited by qwerty2008
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I'll share an interesting recipe for carp.

 

Procure one carp and one cedar board slightly larger than the carp.

Scale, skin, and clean the carp.  Remove head and tail.

Place carp on board and season well with your favorite seafood seasonings. 

Bake for 30 minutes to 45 minutes in a 350 degree F oven (177 degrees C).

Meanwhile, prepare side dishes.

When done, toss the carp in the trash and eat the board.

 

 

 

 

 

I'll get my coat now and go quietly.post-76-0-85663700-1419914588.png

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Hi Crackers ( and Rhonda )

That looks great. Will definitely try it in the next few weeks

I will let you know how I get on

 

Regards

Ken

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When done, toss the carp in the trash and eat the board.

 

I don't know what you're carping about, it should have been pretty good. Might I sugest next time, put a few shallow slices in the skin every couple inches from back to belly. Won't have to cook so long and and the "doneness" will be consistant throughout.

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The candy of meats. Dogs love bacon, but I don't love my dogs enough to share.

I usually buy 30 or 40 pounds of pork belly at a time. Ask your butcher to remove the skin. Else you'll need a very sharp fillet knife.

For each 10 pounds:

2 tbs salt

1/2 to 3/4 cup brown sugar

1 tsp powdered dextrose

1 tsp prague powder #1

Mix ingredients and divide by 2, 1/2 for each side. Rub well onto both sides of meat. Pack together, we don't want air bubbles. Cover WELL and refrigerate for 2 days. Turn and repack, refrigerate for 7 more days. Rinse well in cold water. Pat dry. Hang in smoker (NO smoke yet) with damper wide open with temp at 130 degrees until very dry. NOW apply smoke with damper 1/4 open. Temp is still at 130. Smoke until internal temperature reaches 130. Yes, you read right... It's going to be a long day. Chill over night before slicing.

Note: I like to smoke in apple wood. It goes well with brown sugar. You can use hickory though.

Note: You'll have a lot of fat with no meat. Keep it for roux's.

Note: See how I added salt after slicing and stacking.

Note: You'll get around 60% yield. Still a damn site cheaper than store bought and WAY better.

Freeze whatever you want in vacumme sealed bags.

 

 

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Hello all food lovers, here are the two dishes I made today for dinner with Gwen, the Admiral and I.  Both of us love oriental food and instead of cooking Indonesian I decided to do Thai.

 

The first dish is Gai Sai Taktai or Lemongrass Chicken.  

I bought two fairly large skinless chicken breasts from a free range chicken, no antibiotics, no drugs. I had most of the ingredients except the lemongrass.  I substituted red onion for the traditional shallots, shallots are a little too expensive and the red onion with garlic does a nice job.  Also, instead of Thai Birdseye chilies I used red poblanos, Gwen can't handle the heat anymore and these have a mild, sweet semi hot bite.

 

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Here is the cut-up chicken marinating in a mixture of 2 Tbsp lemon juice and  2 Tbsp Thai fish sauce for 30 minutes. 

 

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These are the rest of the ingredients starting with the top center ramekin,  2 Tbsp chicken stock, julienne Thai kaffir lime leaves, 2 thinly sliced garlic cloves, 1 Tbsp sugar, a pinch Thai chili powder, 2 Tbsp sliced spring onion, 1/3 cup sliced red onion, 1 tsp Thai chili paste, 3 Tbsp thinly sliced fresh lemongrass and in the center is the 3 Tbsp sliced Poblano chilies.

 

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This shows the onions, garlic, chilies and chili powder and lemongrass being sautéed in 1 Tbsp coconut oil.

 

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After the ingredients in the previous step have sautéed for about 3 minutes or until you can smell the fragrance you add the chicken with the marinade and cook till the chicken is done.  Test for taste and add salt and or chili as desired.

 

 

The next dish is Ginger Baby Bok Choy.  

I bought nine locally grown organic small bok choy in our local small green grocer that deals with organic vegetables and oriental stuff.  I also got a few nice lemons for this dish, the rest of the ingredients I already have.

 

The prepping takes a little time and for this dish I had to separate the leaves and then cut the harder stem parts from the leaves for even cooking.  I also cut them all into smaller pieces.  Here too, I had to temper the chili heat so Gwen could enjoy it without her stomach getting upset, the poor dear.  

 

She cooked jasmine white rice for the starch.

 

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This shows the ingredients and starting from the top left, 2 Tbsp seasoned rice wine vinegar, 2 Tbsp Tamari soy sauce, 2 Tbsp mirin, 1 tsp toasted sesame oil, 1 tsp honey (in jar ), 1 Tbsp coconut oil in jar with baggie):  second row, 1 Tbsp sambal ulek or Indonesian chili sauce, cam use dried chili flakes soaked in water but I like the sambal uek, 3 cloves garlik, thinly sliced, 2 Tbsp minced ginger;  third row, 2 Tbsp lemon juice and sesame seeds for drizzling and sprinkling when dish is plated.  Check first to see if the dish is not already tart enough.  Finally 1/3 cup sliced spring onions. 

Mix together the vinegar, tamari, mirin, honey and sesame oil in a bowl and set aside. 

 

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Here you see that I have separated the harder stems from the leaves and chopped them into smaller pieces.  

 

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The cooking begins by heating the coconut oil in a wol over high heat till the oil starts to smoke and coat the entire bottom of the wok.  Now add the chopped stems, sambal ulek or chili flakes or minced Thai tiger chilies, spring onions, garlic and ginger.  Stir-fry for a minute or so, then add the sauce mixture and cook for an other minute or two.

Now add the bok choy leaves and cook for another minute or so.  The bok choy should be crisp tender, just enough for the cell walls to break-down.

 

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This shows the completed dish, which is ready to be put into a serving dish.

 

I omitted putting these dishes in serving bowls, we just spoon it on our plates in the kitchen cafeteria style and then sit down and enjoy the food.  I omitted putting extra lemon juice over my bok choy, it was tart enough but did put the sesame seed on it, yummy.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia, hexnut, Vivian Galad and 4 others like this

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