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Geoff Matson

Constitution by Geoff Matson - Model Shipways 2040 - 1/76 scale

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I don't know anything about guns or how to maintain them, but I did see something about using Birchwood Super Blue for blacking. Do you know if this stuff is the same thing as Birchwood Perma Blue?

Super Blue.jpg

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I have used both on guns as well as the chain. This is just a little stronger medium. I got his one from the gun area at Walmart. Another benefit of living in the country. It looks good and I find it easier than painting. When I mount the bow sprit I will post a picture. I am holding off on the bowsprit for as long as I can. I am afraid I will break something. Once I get to the stays I will have to mount it. 

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I am getting close to installing the foremast. I was often confused about whether to clue it or leave it loose and let the rigging keep it in place. I know if I glue it, I will break it and be screwed. If I just set it in the mast hole and let the rigging hold it in place, it will twist, and I will be screwed. I came upon another method that I am going to use. It is a product called Quick-Stix remove-able wax. I purchased it on Amazon for $5.00 .My wife has a friend who builds miniature doll houses and uses it all the time. It is a soft wax that sticks to what it is applied too. It holds the item firm in place. If you need to remove it, ok. If you need to tweak it, ok. I feel it will be great on the masts and bowsprit. Just put a little ball of the wax on the bottom of the mast and stick it in place. It will hold them in place, while the rigging is done. If you have an accident, you can remove it. You could use it in many instances while modeling. 

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Quote

 

Geoff I can't seem to find this on Amazon. Can you help with a link?

Thanks

J

Edited by J T Lombard

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I made a little progress today. I have the swifter lines on the foremast roughed in. I rigged as much of the foremast off the ship to make it as easy as I could. When I did this I needed a way to hold the rat nest of lines off the model and not get snagged on anything. I picked up a couple of those plexiglass picture frames that you stick the pictures it. They work great keeping the lines from getting caught on the model. 

 

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I got my feet wet over the weekend on the starting of the rigging the lower foremast shrouds. All in all, it went pretty well. My plan is to finish the lower formast shrouds by the weekend. I used my (quik stik) to set my mast. It works well and lets me tweak the mast when necessary. My deadeye spacer is working well. I made all my line with the Byrnes Ropewalk. I chose cotton thread. All my line is tied with actual knots. The knots are then set with diluted white glue. The cotton thread lets the glue soak in. Once everything is set and the way I like it I trim off the whiskers. 

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Geoff I do not have my sea legs on the shrouds yet. Are they paired starboard to port or port to port and starboard to starboard?

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Dave:  In the picture, the line with the double and triple block is called the swifter. There is one on the port and one on the starboard. They are single.  Then you have the first pair of shrouds on each side. They are paired, two to the starboard side and then two to the port side. I started from the stem and worked aft. Keep pin mind as you work aft the shrouds do get longer. Hope this helps. 

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I made some progress this week. I finished the foremast lower shrouds and added the shear pole. Every things was tied and then the knots set with diluted white glue. I was really amazed how the shear pole firmed everything up. This week I will attempt to get the lower main mast and shrouds installed. This whole process is very tedious and I try to work on about one hour sessions and then take some breaks. I am getting pretty good at tying knots with tweezers. 😁

 

 

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Get used to doing everything with tweezers soon. Get yourself some long ones to reach through the rigging once you start on the running rigging. Your shrouds look great.

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jfinan:   The kit supplies you with a roll of copper tape. It is up to you figure out what to do with it. Since I started the kit years ago I went with the ponce wheel and tape. I think the ponce wheel is over kill. If I were to do it over I would just do the plain blank plates. At a scale of 1/76 I don't think you would see the bolts. But at the time I thought it looked cool. In the future I am going to try and stay with 1/4 inch scale. That way I think the details will look more realistic.  Thanks for the interest.

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