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BenF89

40' Cruising Sailboat by BenF89 - 1:12 Scale - SMALL

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Hi Ben

 

I have a feeling that the future owner of your boat (aka your daughter) is going to be extremely chuffed at the progress so far.  Without a doubt, your design is coming to life; piece by piece.

 

Top work so far! 

 

Cheers. 

 

Patrick

Edited by Omega1234

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Thanks, guys, for following along and the encouragement! I'm excited to share the next couple things I've put together.

 

INTERIOR LAYOUT/FURNISHINGS WORK - GALLEY PART 2

I decided to start over with the galley. It was a good learning experience, and the second time around a couple design and process changes made it a lot better. I started the same way, making the base. But this time, I built-up two pieces of 1/8" x 1/8" rather than ripping down a 1/8" x 1/2" (I don't have 1/8" x 1/4", and I was too impatient/cheap to get it. But that's its own problem...). I also set the pins using the drawing, rather than just using them to hold the already cut pieces. A minor change, but one which ensured everything was straight and square. Then, I cut the back piece of the 'U'. I made an aesthetic design change, moving the stove all the way to the forward side, to free up some otherwise useless counter space. The below picture was taken at that point in the process:

 

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Galley Rebuild - Base and Back Face

 

Next, I cut and installed the sides, going slowly and making sure that everything was straight.

 

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Sides Installed

 

So far, so good. Next came the real challenging part, that gave me headaches last time - the stove pocket. Since there is no real inside to the cabinets, I decided to use 1/4" thick craft plywood to make the sides. For one, it's less prone to bending, and secondly it has a relatively large, flat surface to mount to. I cut the pieces with the scroll saw, to ensure that the cuts were straight through the thickness (I tend to induce a bevel when I use my hand saw). I also made the entire base out of 1/8" x 1/2", again to get wide flat pieces to keep the base square and help with keeping the walls straight. The finished stove pocket assembly is below:

 

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Stove Pocket Assembly

 

Finally, I had to attach it to the galley. Before, I had tried to build supports off the bottom of the stove pocket which landed on the galley base; that didn't work, so this time I set the whole thing upside down, so the top would be flush. That worked pretty well.

 

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Attaching Stove Pocket to Galley Assembly

 

The only other thing I've done with the galley assembly since putting this together last week was to add the solid bottom to the stove pocket, which is just a piece of 1/32" basswood. This is because I got a bit distracted on a mini-project (for the boat) inspired by the arrival of some sheet polystyrene I had ordered... More to follow ;)

Edited by BenF89

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INTERIOR LAYOUT/FURNISHINGS WORK - GALLEY PART 3 

As I mentioned in the previous post, I was distracted from finishing the cabinet work in the galley by the arrival of some polystyrene sheet I had ordered. I had never scratch built something from bare sheet before, and I had an idea of what I wanted to do first. To be fair, it is something that I would have needed to do sooner rather than later to finish the galley arrangement, since it impacts the counter top. It's bit of a mini-model, kind of like the Yanmar engine that I did a year or two ago.

 

I started by cutting out the parts, measuring from the drawings I made out of the design model:

 

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Mini-Model Parts Cut

 

I used some 1/8 x 1/8 square stock polystyrene I had laying around to help with lining parts up, similar to the furnishings in the boat. I had to leave the top off until the very end, so I could access the inside to add weight to balance the assembly when it's suspended.

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Assembly Phase 1

 

With the basic assembly put together, I started to add the details:

 

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Assembly Phase 2

 

By now it's obvious (and, may have been from the beginning) that I've made the gimballed galley stove. It was part of my initial vision to have a truly gimbaled stove. I painted up the stove, did my final rebalancing to make sure it sat right in the gimbal slots, and then attached the top. The Admiral decided on the white stove (even though most I've seen are just stainless steel). It does make it look more 'cute' and less 'industrial', so I'm OK with it. Below is the stove seated in its cutout, and a couple pictures demonstrating that it does in fact rotate to stay level as the boat heels:

 

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Galley Stove in Place

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Gimbal demonstration

 

Finally, a shot of the galley assembly (so far) placed in the hull:

 

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Galley Assembly in Boat

 

Next step is to pick up where I left off with the Galley assembly; I need to add the inboard facing walls that connect it to the fore and aft bulkheads. Then, I need to figure out the sink - that's the other item that will hold up the counter top. Although, I'll probably do much of the finish work (staining/varnishing, and marking out cabinet doors and such) before doing the counter top, since I don't want the sink or stove to get in the way of the staining (or, get stained!). So that may be a little ways off - I still need to install the rest of the joinery and the floor and bulkhead paneling before doing any finish staining.

Edited by BenF89

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Thanks, Patrick! It was a lot of fun to do some 'detail' work again. It's interesting how there are different challenges doing a larger scale boat and a small scale model. I find I like a mix of both, and I guess I was missing the 'little details' part that I enjoyed so much doing the engine.

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INTERIOR LAYOUT/ FURNISHINGS WORK- GALLEY PART 4

 

Small update: got the inboard walls of the galley cut, and installed the ‘U’ assembly and the two walls:

 

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Inboard Walls Installed

 

And, a couple ‘overview’ shots- I placed the engine temporarily, to get a sense of how it will fit. Not sure when I’ll install it permanently. The second picture has the boat propped up it induce a heel; you can see the gimbaled stove in action!

 

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Till next time...

 

 

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Hi Ben

 

She’s looking better and better each day!  I really like the overhead shots, as they put the results of your hard work in perspective.  

 

One quick question though. Has this little beauty got a name yet?

 

Cheers. 

 

Patrick

Edited by Omega1234

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Hi Patrick!

 

Thanks - I like the overheads, too. Puts it into perspective for me, too! I usually have some manner of tools, or scrap, or 'junk' stored in the boat (you know, like a real boat would have!) and so I don't even always see it all interacting together.

 

As for the name - I've started thinking about it, and I think she'll be unnamed until my daughter 'receives' it, and she'll provide the name.

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Hi Ben

Just discovered this build and read it from inception to present. Quite an achievement. While I have never done a full interior build like this with an existent hull I have done a couple of builds using fiberglass hulls made by cottage companies that did not provide any bulkhead information. I ended up using two methods that were as much as my simple mind could come up with. On one I stole some of the kids clay and rolled it out to about 1/4" thick and placed it where I wanted the bulkhead to be and then squished it outer edges until they formed to the inside of the hull. I then carefully lifted the form out and traced it onto stiff cardboard, (Empty cereal boxes) making it about 1/16th larger. Cut it out and then final fit it to the hull by cutting off the excess as needed. Rinse and repeat for each bulkhead and I had patterns for all.

 

On another build I kind of did the same thing but used metal window screen. I cut squares that would fit each location and then folded the edges by pressing against the hull until I had a tight fit all of the way around and traced the results onto stiff paper again.

 

Just a couple of approaches for a guy who has no concept of either math or CAD! Even some of my tools are kind of stone age come to think of it!

 

Having said all that I really enjoyed your build so far and now that I have found it intend to continue following it. May have to kick that guy out of the forward bunk to get a seat at this late date but I'm pretty sure he won't say anything.

 

I did notice though that daughter gets the professionally designed doll yacht with gimballed stove, while poor #2 kid gets the Duplo brick job that he probably had to partly build himself!:rolleyes::D

 

(It does look like he was both proud and happy with it though and got more than his moneys worth in play time.)

Edited by lmagna

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Hahaha! Yeah, I was actually having a similar conversation with the Admiral last night about whose boat it will be. We concluded that the ‘doll house’ will be for my daughter, but as with literally anything else in the house, that distinction probably won’t matter much.

 

That said, the cat’s not totally out of the bag on why I’m ‘building the boat’ and it could easily be presented more generally to both of them. The pink hull may complicate that, but that’s overcomable.

 

(My other suggestion to the Admiral was a second project to even it out. That idea wasn’t received as warmly - especially since then the third would feel left out when he gets older...  :rolleyes:)

 

Glad you found the build and thanks for following along!

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The answer to the first build that may have to be replaced with a second build, (Because daddy was REALLY building this one for himself) with the addition of two others, (To be fair to the other two kids). You will also have to find a proper ship for the Admiral! Simple solution only five ships to build that way! I have the un-started kit of the Titanic sitting right next to the box of my present build just to remind my Admiral that I am thinking of her build as well. (Empithis on THINKING):rolleyes:

 

Another concern is that kids grow whether you work on them or not, I know. I have been growing kids for over 45 years now and the youngest is only 11! Pretty soon you will have to set the "Doll Boat" aside and design the real thing for her as she will have progressed from boy dolls and toy boats the the real things!:huh::default_wallbash::D

 

Now that I have planted that in your head, I'll go back to my bunk until you have MORE PICTURES!

Edited by lmagna

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My temporarily shelved Edmund Fitzgerald is my boat. So there’s two. That just leaves the other two kids, and the Admiral.

 

Though she would probably rather have me build (or finish) the grape arbor/trellace/pergola thing we started 3 years ago in our back yard... 

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Sometimes we build because...(fill in various reasons here).   My current build was selected by my Admiral.  Not my first choice but it's a ship and I'm building it.  I'm also learning a lot and when not frustrated (only seldom) I'm having fun.  I think this goes with the hobby and also Lou is right.. you'll need to make 5 ships.

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It's a good point. I said the Fitz would be my boat, and that's probably true. But my eventual goal is a completely designed RC boat, like a workboat of some type. Not a replica of an existing boat, though emulating the style of many, but from hull form through to interior design starting with a blank sheet of paper. That would be a fun father-son(s) project, since by the time I get there they'll be old enough to appreciate it. We'll see - lots of time to figure that out. Space is the real issue - we're going to run out of room for all these boats real quick! :) 

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OK Ben here is your RC project.

 

Even in 1/48th scale it works out to just a little over two feet long. (I would have to go downstairs in the basement to get a more accurate measurement and I'm beat right now from having to do actual work)

 

Anyway you need to build a modern day Voith Schneider drive harbor tug. It will give you a challenge in designing the RC functions of the twin drives so that they are intuitive. You can design the superstructure in any number of ways, as no two of these kinds of tugs are the same anyway. And after you get it built you will find it is the most novel and interesting ship you have ever driven. You can do ANYTHING with it including dancing! It is never a boring moment. You could even use it to tow yourself, (Or Doll Boat) around the pond!) You will eventually need to try pushing a basketball around the lake! Like I said tons of fun!

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Been quite busy in the ‘real world’ so to speak - between a busy season with my work and the start of a house ‘facelift’ (nothing major- some drywall removal to expose raw wood plank sheathing we just found out we had and a fair bit of painting, for the most part), I haven’t had much time for the boat, and when I have, there wasn’t any time left to post! So here’s a small update on what I’ve done since last:

 

INTERIOR LAYOUT/FURNISHINGS WORK - CABIN SOLE PART 1 AND NAV STATION PART 1

First, I took a break from ‘building’ and started some ‘finishing’. An idea I’ve had for a while was to use wood coffee stirs with square ends as wood planking. It might not be museum quality material, but it’s wood, it’s in roughly right-scale dimensions (to scale it would be something like 2 or 3 inch planks 5-1/2 ft long), and it’s cheap (I a pack of two 1,000 count boxes, so 2,000 total, for $13 on Amazon). I started at the forward end, since that’s where I have completed the furnishings that define the walking flats, and did most of the forward half of the interior:

 

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First Run of Interior Flooring 

 

After some down time, I got the ‘building’ itch again and started on the nav station. This has its own interesting set of challenges- each ‘sub assembly’ of furniture has- but I’m slowly piecing it together. The first picture is what is permanently installed thus far, and the second has the chart table piece dry fitted in. The angled bracket things will form the sides of a console holding an electronic chart plotter and engine instruments, at a minimum. Though it might not be tall enough for the chart plotter, at least not a decent size one. Might have to think on that a bit...

 

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Nav Station Status 

 

That’s it for now. Next will be more development of the nav station. At some point. Thanks for looking in!

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Back again....

 

So, that 'nothing major' house work turned into a HUGE project - tearing drywall down from walls and ceilings in our kitchen/living room, painting, trim/crown molding, re-furnishing to match the new 'look', etc. Then we decided since everything was already chaotic, we'd do the flooring project we'd been planning. We took out all our carpet and put hardwood floors in all three bedrooms, hall, kitchen, and living room. While living in the house. With three kids, the oldest of which is 5. Oh, and we installed a wood cookstove. Needless to say, it was a busy summer - about three months straight of daily work. Then some down time, plus family visits, then the holidays, and all of the sudden it's January. 

 

But, I did get back into the groove a little. Only one picture to show for it, but I built the quarter berth portside aft, and laid some deck planking down in the little 'navigation area' at the forward end of the berth. Haven't quite figured out how I'm going to integrate it into the rest of the planking - I'm hoping it lines up ok. Also, on the outboard side of the berth I put in the lower face of a little storage cubby thing. 

 

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Aft Quarter Berth

 

Still a lot left to do, with many challenges in terms of how I'm going to pull off what I've got planned. 'Till next time!

 

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3 hours ago, BenF89 said:

So, that 'nothing major' house work turned into a HUGE project - tearing drywall down from walls and ceilings in our kitchen/living room, painting, trim/crown molding, re-furnishing to match the new 'look', etc. Then we decided since everything was already chaotic, we'd do the flooring project we'd been planning. We took out all our carpet and put hardwood floors in all three bedrooms, hall, kitchen, and living room. While living in the house. With three kids, the oldest of which is 5. Oh, and we installed a wood cookstove.

Wow that sounds like an incredibly challenging job Ben. Good to see you back in the shipyard.

 

Michael

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Posted (edited)

Hi Ben

 

Welcome back!!  I’m glad to see the progress you’ve made.  The interior, especially the oven, looks great.

 

Also, as someone who has been through numerous renovations/extensions in our house, I know how you must feel.  It’s always satisfying once it’s over.

 

Have a great 2019.

 

Cheers. 

 

Patrick

Edited by Omega1234

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just a couple of nails.....the admiral told me,  for the last reno we did.   what did we do........gut the room!   glad you are back at the table.....Barbie's gotta be what..........50 now?!?!?!  :D     glad to have you back!

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On 1/8/2019 at 1:22 PM, BenF89 said:

So, that 'nothing major' house work turned into a HUGE project

I hate DIY projects, mainly because a) the estimated project times are always wrong by at least a factor of two, b) I'm not good at them, and c) after I finish my do-it-yourself project it always looks like someone did it himself (if you catch my meaning)!

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