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Launching ways

50 posts in this topic

Very nice and very clever !  Thanks for posting.

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Wow, Cof, I like that one! Can you shoot a few more pictures and give some dimensions? Mine's a 1/64th scale.

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Brian, his blog says about 70 cm long

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Cor,

Thanks for the links.  It pushes me to try and do this myself.

 

I did contact Velieri. 

They do not take PayPal, only bank draft... at least from the U.S. 

After reading Pukko's comment I don't wonder why.

 

Just more reason to attempt it as a scratch build.  I need to go back to the link Cor provided and get a translation, but the pictures are pretty self explanatory.

 

Richard.

cor, GLakie and Jack12477 like this

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In the lower right corner of the Velieri site it allows you to change the currency type.  Changing to Dollars says the launch kit is $185.41

You can scratch build a heck of a lot less.

 

 

Tom

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I built this slip with groundways to display my framed Swan class model. It is based on the description in Building the Wooden Fighting Ship, by Dodds and Moore. I omitted the shoring poles so as to not obscure the hull. After being built the ship would be encased in a launching cradle, which is shown on a photo on the first page of this topic.

 

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GuntherMT, GLakie, Jaxboat and 13 others like this

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Joel

 

Back to your picture of "can you count the Dry Docks".  Is the large rectangular object moored on the far right hand edge of the basin a floating dry dock?  I could not blow up the picture but it looks like it has gates on one end and  Helicopter pad build over the other end. 

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Joel

 

Back to your picture of "can you count the Dry Docks".  Is the large rectangular object moored on the far right hand edge of the basin a floating dry dock?  I could not blow up the picture but it looks like it has gates on one end and  Helicopter pad build over the other end. 

I think it's just a barge, Phil, though a really big one, I must admit.  If it were a drydock I think you'd see the shadow of the side of the well the way the light is.

Well, on closer look, I think it is either a training ship of some sort or a service vessel.  Just forward of the 'H' it says 'LONGBOW' which is a version of an Apache helicopter.

Blow up from GoogleMaps:

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A service ship is a good bet, or barge. Thanks for blowing it up Joel.

 

Phil

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Toly.коль, как ты, делают кирпичи?

1. bought the tile of the desired color 2. sawing with a diamond disk to a depth of 2 mm with water then broke in half 3. sawing CIRCULAR SAW  FEТ

1. купил плитку нужного цвета  2. пилил алмазным диском на глубину 2 мм с водой потом ломал  пополам 3. пилил на ЦИРКУЛЯРНАЯ ПИЛА FET

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post-3328-0-51264900-1425373761.jpg

PeteB, cristikc, WackoWolf and 1 other like this

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That's an awful lot of Euros for an American dollar. I think I'll try to make something like the one in the photo by jbsham.

 

I do have time yet, so if anyone comes up with anything else, I'm all ears. Said Ross Parrot.

 

I'm a bit late to the party, but You may want to take a look at the section by Richard Barker, 2003. “Cradles of Navigation” Re-Visited. In Shipbuilding Practice and Ship Design Methods from the Renaissance to the 18th Century: A Workshop Report, 103–163. Preprint 245. [berlin]: Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte. https://www.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de/Preprints/P245.PDF.

He provides several sketches of a variety of launching methods starting on page 155.

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When a ship is launched, it is supposed to pivot about the forward cradle. Looking at the starboard side of the ship, as it enters the water the stern should lift and the vessel would rotate in a clockwise direction about the forward support. If the stern does not have sufficient buoyancy there is a danger of the vessel pivoting about the end of the ways (rotating counterclockwise) and breaking the keel. For this reason, the forward support- called the fore poppet is built to accommodate this rotation, either with blocking that is crushed as the vessel pivots or with specially curved surfaces.

 

For this reason, I don't believe that vertical posts on the fore poppet would be used as these would punch a hole in the bow when the ship rotates.

 

For a 20th century discussion of launching see Principles of Naval Architecture by Rossell and Chapman Volume I or any other naval architecture textbook

 

Roger Pellett

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