Jump to content

Elder Jim

Members
  • Content Count

    103
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Eastern Shore, MD, USA
  • Interests
    Sailing & cruising, Ship modeling, Photography

Recent Profile Visitors

420 profile views
  1. Wiktor, Nice looking models. At least you have something to keep you busy. I've been under Chemo treatments since Feb of 2018 and they really mess up plans. My alternate interests were our 32" Sailboat and photography and the Doc's don't want me in the sun fore more than about 20 minutes at a time and I can't get out of the slip and the sails up in that time so the sailing is temporally, I hope, a thing of the past. I have built a couple of ship models, and have one half done, but just can't get up the interest in that detail work the way I feel. Jim
  2. I think I joined the old Model Ship World in 2009; I was starting my first build, a Billings Boats Bluenose, and some other model builder suggested it--don't remember who suggested it and at my age that's no surprise 😀. It was been very useful when I "got stuck" or questioned the instructions. I'm primarily a winter builder; in the spring and summer we spend as much time as possible on our IP cutter sailing the Chesapeake bay.
  3. Thank you for your service!! My military service long proceeded yours, Army Transportation Corps; I was in from mid-July 1962 to mid-September 1964--that was just after those two destroyers got shot up(?) in the Gulf of Tong-kin. Fortunately I wasn't over there and spent my two years state side but I had two close calls and orders were cut for me to go the the Officers' Jungle Warfare school in Panama, but they were cancelled when someone realized I didn't have the required 13 months left to serve. I became a part time modeler when I retired and we moved to Maryland from MA where there is much more winter to shovel, plow, push, etc. I take the spring and summer off as we have a full size cruising sailboat that we use here on the Chesapeake Bay. So far my builds are: A Billings Boats model of the Bluenose II thaT I somewhat customized to look more like the original Bluenose, A Victoria R/C model--that's a lot of fun if there is a club nearby. Sailing alone is boring. A model of the first winner of the Americas' Cup A Grand Banks fishing dory is in long delayed process. Have a Happy New Year. Jim
  4. Charter33, Some time back an older member of our modeling club had a 1930's vintage sailing Pond Model that had lines running from the aft end of the jib boom back to the tiller to work as a semi-functional self steering and trim the jib after a tack. Unfortunately I don't remember any details, but it must have worked reasonably well on a close reach course to keep the boat headed for the opposite shore where they could recover it. Jim
  5. Messis, Looks great and very nearly done ! She was sailing around the Eastern Shore of Maryland last summer; were you able to see her at any of her Ports of Call? I was in Annapolis when she happened to be there so stopped to have a look, but the crowds were so thick that I opted not to go aboard. The thing that struck me the most was the myriad of colors
  6. Years ago, and long before R/C, I remember seeing Pond Models being sailed on weekends in local ponds; I was just a kid at the time and living in the outskirts of New York City. There used to be a group in Marblehead, MA that had frequent regattas/demonstrations, but no longer living in the New England area, I don't know if the club still exists. I suspect there are still a few around, but those hobbyists would be pretty ancient by now and the old boats either converted to R/C or become home decorations. The new guys have mostly converted to Radio Control. In today's society and the younger people being often vandelizing stuff just for the heck of it, I can't imagine someone putting in years of toil making the model and leaving it out, unprotected at night.
  7. Philo426 Sorry for my delay in answering, but I have had a problem (now fixed) signing into the MSW site. I am not an expert on the Constitution, but have been aboard her several times. The attached photos may help answer your question. The older(first) photo of USS Constitution is from a postcard with a date of 1931 taken at the Boston Navy Yard; I do not know if the 1931 date is the date the card was purchased or printed. Compared to the later (third) photo my wife took in July 1997 from our boat off Marblehead, MA when she sailed under her own power not tethered to another ship as she generally is for the 'semi-annual "turnaround" in Boston Harbor. That voyage was the first time she had "free sailed' in 100 years. You will notice the big difference in the length of the bowsprit; some newer repair must have shortened it. I believe there have been at least three; I believe the first was done in the 1920's. There was also a very extensive restoration completed in the 1990's and there was some additional work done a few years ago. The second photo is an official Dept. of the Navy photo taken that same day. photo my wife took in July 1997 from our boat off Marblehead, MA when she sailed under her own power not tethered to another ship as she generally is for the 'semi-annual "turnaround" in Boston Harbor. That voyage was the first time she had "free sailed' in 100 years. You will notice the big difference in the length of the bowsprit; some newer repair must have shortened it. I believe there have been at least three; I believe the first was done in the 1920's. There was also a very extensive restoration completed in the 1990's and there was some additional work done a few years ago. The second photo is an official Dept. of the Navy photo taken that same day. If you are still unsure if your painting is a true copy, allowing of course for "artist's license", you might consider sending a photocopy of it to the Naval Museum at the Academy and ask for their opinion. I have found them to be quite helpful when I have had some obscure question that I couldn't find an answer. Elder Jim .
  8. The Bluenose society or association has a website promoting its memory, but I don't remember the url. Try googling "Bluenose fishing schooner".
  9. 1. Definitely build a model of something that interests you. 2. Larger is easier to build than smaller, especially for a beginner, and small tools suitable for modeling are not common items in the typical home tool box. 3. If you don't have any sailboat experience, complex rigs are going to be confusing and most model plans are not very helpful with explanations. I'm not familiar with either model, but gunboats and their rigs are relatively simple so either one should be ok. 4. This one is a tip. Don't use super glue for planking; it sets too fast and is too difficult to remove a plank if it sets wrong. I'd suggest something like Elmer's or even better Tightbond's Carpenters glue--the yellowish stuff. Now read #2 again! 5. Don't rush the build; it won't get done much faster and it leads to errors which have to be undone and done over. See if you can find a similar model to what you picked in Model Shipways' offerings; their kits seem to have the best plans and instructions and the plans are in English; that's not always true with foreign models. If you get stuck or don't understand the how or why while building, post your question here. There are a lot of really expert modelers here who will be more than willing to help--just ask. Welcome to ship modeling and good luck with your first
  10. Vintageone,   I saw your request for info on a boat model by the Ferris Model Boat Co posted a couple of days ago, but was traveling and couldn't get back to you then; when I tried to respond the message had apparently been moved or removed.

     

    Anyway, I can't help with the Ferris Model Co, but my father had a boat very similar to what you described from the early 30's through about 1946.  The boat was called a "Rumson Bay Knockabout"; she was a gaff rigged centerboard sloop, about 22'- 24' long, and rather wide for her length, but she was fast and won his Yacht Club's annual trophy several times.  I was very young at the time so my detail memory is lacking, but if you decide to  build the model, I have several photos of it that I could scan and send to you should you want them.

     

    Elder Jim

    jcamsr@gmail.com

     

     

    1. vintageone

      vintageone

      Hi Jim,That is so neat,I would love to see pics. Thanks,Dave

  11. Thanks Dave! I was driving myself crazy (short trip these days) trying to think what those four names had in common with any line--Bearing line, Line of position, Course line, Breeches line, Life line, etc. I think the Equator should properly have been called that or at least 0 deg Latitude as it's not really a line but a reference point for a distance from or to. The closest I've ever been to it is probably Curaco in the southern Caribbean.
  12. Maybe I'm obtuse, but the question doesn't make sense to me. "Been there" (visited, seen,built the model, etc?), "crossed (what) lines"?
  13. It sure confused me and took some study to identify the bow and stern. Maybe if PT-109 had been painted like this, the commander of the destroyer would have thought twice about running her down.
  14. On this side of the pond we think in US$ and according to my rough calculations, 250 Lbs is about US$320; that sounds a bit steep especially with the damage that only a good modeler (and knot tier) would have the knowledge to accomplish. If the shop owner wanted to get it fixed up it would cost him several hours of skilled labor which I guessing would cost him another $2-300 so he's "in the hole" unless he gets really lucky with somebody that walks in the door. It looks like a nice well done model and assuming you have the time and skills to do the work and a place to exhibit it when done, I'd probably offer about 40 lbs, and point out the work needed to repair; you might even embellish it. If he says no, start to walk out. He might just take the offer if he thinks a "live one" is walking away, but don't let yourself get into an auction or you will end up overpaying. Remember you have a time and material project ahead of you it even if, for ourselves, "we work cheap". Good Luck!

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...