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russ

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About russ

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    Male
  • Location
    Biloxi, Mississippi
  • Interests
    Reading, research, and ship modeling

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  1. Matt: You are off and running. I agree that the fairing process is not complete, but it is not a bad thing. We have all been there before I assure you. I would suggest removing the planks and doing some more sanding and checking before you begin again. That might sound drastic, but you can get extra planking strips from a local hobby or craft store if you need to. A small block of wood with some sanding paper wrapped around it or even rubber cemented to it will do the job of fairing. You can use a strip to check against the hull as you go. Sand a little and check, and then sand a little and check again. It will take long before you have a nice smooth hull to plank. Of course, the main thing is to have fun and satisfy your own creative desires. Good luck with your model. Russ
  2. Peter: Very nice job. I have been looking in on this build over time and your finished model is very nice. Congratulations. Russ
  3. I agree that the netting looks very good. I have run the line across a hot light bulb and had good results. The heat melts the beeswax into the line. Russ
  4. Andy: I would start with square stock and mark out the lines to make it octagonal and then round it out to make your spar. You can do this with careful marking with a sharp pencil and work with a file to make it octagonal. You can then finish it by hand sanding or by chucking the piece into a power drill and using sandpaper to round it and taper it. There are several different methods you can use. The main thing is that the square stock has the grain running along its length. With a dowel, the grain could be running in any direction which is one reason why it warps. Russ
  5. Your model is looking really good. Nice work. As for those pesky dowels, I am not a fan for the very reason you state, but if you must have them, then check the local craft stores like Michaels or Hobby Lobby etc. Russ
  6. Kurt: It has been a while since I looked at Pete's builds. Keep in mind, the margin plank and the covering board are two completely different pieces. In any case, build the model as you like. Have fun. Russ
  7. Kurt: Most margin planks I have seen had the scarph joint to connect them, regardless of the nibbing. If you can, look at some specific examples of boats like what you are modeling and perhaps that would clear it up. Russ
  8. Biddlecombe has tables for a schooner's rigging. That is where the value is. Russ
  9. Sam: I would think that would work out okay. You might consult Biddlecombe since it is a little later and has more information on the schooner rig. Russ
  10. Sam: The lower gaff that you have circled is probably the fore gaff for the foresail. This is a regular part of the schooner rig. That foresail is loose footed with no boom. Ideally, it would be peaked up at a higher angle than what is shown. The foresail would be brailed up when furled. The fore and aft main sail could be furled by lowering the gaff or by brailing. If this was a brig rig, the that mainsail would be the spanker or driver sail. In the schooner rig, it is the mainsail. The other ones circled further up, I have no idea. Russ
  11. Well, you have gone and done it now!!! Your hull looks like it will come together nicely. This has been very interesting to watch so far. Thanks. I will look forward to following your progress. Russ
  12. Sam: That looks very good. Will you add any cleats to the gaffs to keep the halyard blocks in place? Russ
  13. Sam: Your rigging looks pretty good to my eye. Go with what you got I say. Russ
  14. Chuck: This will be a beautiful model and a project that modelers will enjoy. I think the planking will be especially nice on this hull. Russ

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