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KeithAug

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About KeithAug

  • Birthday 05/27/1953

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sussex, England.
  • Interests
    Sailing, Naval History, Model Ship Building, Model Steam Engine Building. Maisie walking - she is top left.

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  1. I had an internet access problem for most of the week but finally it seems to be in the past. It was 8 days ago that I last posted and the new airbrush arrived a week ago today. Over Sunday trough Tuesday I applied 7 coats of white matt Humbrol enamel paint, - oil based and diluted to the consistency of skimmed milk. The barely visible effect that I was trying to achieve on the scupper doors turned out how I wanted. I took a lot of care to press down the edges of the masking tape. Fortunately this paid off as I got no bleed at all. The tape came off cleanly and fortunately didn't pull of any of the poly layers. Given the interest previously shown in the paint scheme i have included a number of photos.
  2. Peter. I have seen both pale and the more yellow boxwood - seen in your photographs. If you are anything like my age you may recall the wooden foot rules from school. These were invariably made from boxwood and my recollection is that they were generally the colour in your photo. The real question is what effect you are trying to achieve on your model and whether the darker colour is a problem. I keep this as a handy reference as to the more common woods to use...........http://modelshipbuilder.com/page.php?49
  3. Patrick, he could consider flogging his art collection and investing the proceeds in a sensible / stylish classic yacht. I see he / she isn’t into classical art. I’m not really surprised!!!! You need to find the crappy photo setting on your camera, it is great for washing out the detail. All my cameras come with this as the default setting. Amazing detail, just love it.
  4. Mark / John - you both make plausible suggestions. Whatever the reasoning it is still in a vulnerable position and somewhat weaker than it need have been. Maybe people with millions to spend don’t worry about repair bills.
  5. Druxey - yes you make a good point. It is all low tack tape and the edging tape is Tamiya tape but never the less I agree it should not be on for more than a few days. Hopefully the airbrush will be here on Saturday and at 3 coats a day I should have the paintwork finished by late Monday.
  6. Eberhard - Yes I agree. As I look at more of the detail I find a few things that are not as I would want them. I wonder if some of the build was compromised by rushed design or build. With particular respect to the rubbing strip, clearly any discontinuity weakens the strip itself and introducing vertical edges provides opportunity for the strip to be caught and pulled off when rubbing against the dock. Like you I can not remember a yacht that I have been on where the rubbing strip is compromised in this way.
  7. Before making the rubbing strip I completed the bulwark stipe masking at the stern. The rather rough marking was improved by removing the tape, smoothing with a french curve, cutting and then replacement. As far as I can tell the rubbing strip is of double "U" profile. I used the back edge of a box cutte blade for the scraper. Profile notches were cut in with a grinding disc mounted in a craft drill. I did this twice, the wider notch on the right proved to be too wide. The one on the left is .090" wide and this looked more in scale when offered up to the hull. The big advantage of using the back of the blade is that the blade itself can be left razor sharp for later use....................................................................................................... just kidding, I ground the edge off to avoid slicing my fingers. The strips were made from old Venetian Blind slats - not sure what wood but it has very fine and straight grain. The profile was scraped before the profiled edge was slit off on the circular saw using a .031" slitting saw blade. The strip was .050 thick (1.8" at full size). the rubbing strip fully overlaps the bottom edge of the scupper doors and hence is cut to allow the doors to open. The back of the rubbing strip had to be relieved to fit over the scupper doors. The strip was offered up to the hull, the scupper positions marked and then the relief scraped away using a box cutter blade. I also took the opportunity to mask off the remainder of the "not to be painted" hull. The rubbing strips were then clamped in place following the line of the deck edge (the lower edge of the lower bulwark plank). With the strips clamped in place a thin bead of CA glue was run along the edge and allowed to weep behind the strip by capillary action. A fine line was then marked at the scupper sides using a craft knife. I have ordered a replacement airbrush to replace some cheap ones bought with the compressor. When it arrives I will get on painting the hull.
  8. A interesting project Zbip. I particularly liked how you approached problem solving. The below decks gear is very neatly done.
  9. Thank you Zbip. I particularly liked the film from the bow showing her tacking.
  10. Mhkash - looking good - what wood are you using for the second layer of planks?

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