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liteflight

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About liteflight

  • Birthday 02/24/1949

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Melbourne, Australia
  • Interests
    Scale sail, model flight

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  1. Rudder fixings: Paint adheres to aluminium more securely if treated with an etch primer to etch the surface. But difficulty of soldering might count against it However steel cans are tin-plated steel and are strong, solderable and paintable, as long as the thickness is acceptable My Scots upbringing is always trying to minimise ( preferably eliminate) expenditure, but shim brass is readily available, and it can be chemically blackened, but you would have to buy it! I see you have deployed your giant match again - probably carved from a telegraph pole cut down in a nearby str
  2. I have been enjoying as always your zigzagging between the construction and the research / Hunting of the Clue (even though there seems to be no Bellman to tell you three times what is true) A couple of snippets that might be useful when you make the next butter boat 1) when you raided the kitchen for butter, you might also have used kitchen wrap (Gladwarp, as we call it). giving the plug a wrap in it will prevent sticking 2) The paper idea is good, and extremely fine pine veneer is available* as cone-shaped wraps sold as holders for party favors (sic). (about .008" th
  3. Interesting and prescient picture! I see Ned Kelly in the crew of the ships Your research and relevant pictures are never dull
  4. Thanks for that, Steven Feels about what I expected, but as you say, it wasn’t rocket surgery it wasn’ Matthew Parris, either. ( UK MP and hilarious broadcaster)
  5. Welcome to the ranks of honest humans, DCook65 The planking essentially is the ship and is probably the most difficult single task in this or any build Its not the wrong time to be jumping in; do you have the same kit? If so the way to build confidence is to read the build logs of everyone else who has built this or similar kits and map out in your mind the next few steps Then do them
  6. I can see the “cods head, herring tail” shape of the immersed body. I rather suspect that this saying was not published till a century or so later, but I expect that the lessons were being learned and acted upon earlier I find it interesting how blunt an entry can be without too much harm to the drag, but how sensitive the ship is to the aft run. And maritime growth!
  7. And no! I stand on the shoulders of giants to better see over their shoulders and learn from them To tell a secret, when I am trimming a weird plane and I have no idea where the centre of gravity (CG) should be - I don’t fit the G/G for the first flight until I see how it behaves. (and I love C/G in German which is, I believe Schwerpunkt ) This is what I was flying and trimming on Wednesday- a lifting body tailless. Two sizes, this one weighs about 25 gm, just under an ounce And it’s little brother is 66% of the size and flies at 11gm
  8. I didn’t see that one, Steven, but in the 80s? Paul Macready ( who had already won all the man-powered flight prizes) made a pterosaur. It had radio control, was a glider launched by a stonking bungey , and I remember most the rudders which were the two feet and also the casque on the head coupled into the rudder function Ah, got it http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/596/2/MacCready.pdf Paul Macready was a well known aero modeller before being an academic, and his team, pictured in the article includes Martyn Cowley ( I am close to throttling spellchick) another international
  9. They turned up a lot for feet! Yes, neutralising his feet would help. I suspect that mediaeval life would have a generally darkening effect on footwear.
  10. For anyone interested Connie is an Australasian pelican ( pelicanus conspicillatus) and the ruff at the back of her head is a piece of cockatoo feather The model has Platz planform and is controlled only by differential motor thrust. Her big feet give a bit of stability in yaw
  11. Thank you very much Eric, Nelson and EricWilliamMarshall for your kind and thoughtful messages, and to all the “likes” I hesitated before posting as I feared that I would be over-communicating. But it seemed right to let you all know what I am wrestling with at the moment. This corner of Australia is gradually opening up again after COVID ( still possible that more waves are on the way) and the indoor model flying organised by our Mens Shed is beginning to happen again. My wife strongly encouraged me to go whenever it did not interfere with owt medical. So I feel enc
  12. Planking (and revised lines) looking very good Our ‘enery looking very good as well! It wasn’t really a challenge! The manifest will probably include several casks of Madeira. Did we know that Stephanie Flanders; the former BBC Economic Editor, was Michael Flanders daughter? He contracted polio in his 30s I believe
  13. Hi, Eric and other shipbuilders The ship has progressed quite a lot, but the build log not at all My lovely Admiral, who bought me the ship as a Christmas present, died in my arms in November. i have not felt able to post since then, indeed my brain has turned to mush. Recall has become elusive, concentration brief and typing has become difficult as I am dyslexic and rely on a photographic memory for the images of words. To me all words are images and I just type letters till it looks like the image. Added to this is a huge workload of paperwork as E
  14. Nice planking job. You will repeat till it’s right. Your postings give the rest of us reassurance that perseverance wins out in the end I vote that the completed ship will need some figures. Perhaps just ‘Enery on the poop deck and a nimble matelot in the fore top. I’m not cruel, heh heh.
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