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jfinan

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  1. In the past, I have used a small plane to shape my masts and yards. I'm thinking it's time to invest in a small lathe with an accompanying chuck. I had settled on the one Mico-Mark sells only to discover they won't ship that item to Canada. I'm one disappointed Canuck! It seems to me the chuck is essential for this kind of shaping. Ideas (sources) are most welcome and thanks in advance!
  2. I have the Marquardt book, purchased at the Constitution Museum gift shop, and indeed, it is a great reference. That said, I have resolved not to sweat any detailing that will not be seen. As my late Irish mother would say, "A blind man would like to see it". Thanks re: the deck. I had to fill to microscopic gaps (just big enough to grab the eye) but now they're pretty much invisible. I used the two decking sheets from Blue Jacket. In hindsight, I wish I had experimented with ink (wipe on/wipe off) between the planks to add some realism. I might still experiment on some stained deck scraps to see what I can come up with before adding any other superstructures to the deck. After that, I'll flip a coin as to what to tackle next...the transom detail or the bowheads. Either way.....yikes. As you have mentioned, Kurt, it's essential to look into the future and ascertain the consequences. What I would give for a simple "order of operations".
  3. Dear fellow Audi Owner! To be honest, the build is a challenge. If you are a novice, you really should look elsewhere. The instruction book is a substantial compendium of historical information, such as differing descriptions of many iterations and renovations to the ship from 1797 onward, occasionally interspersed with model instructions and advice. If you are used to seeing straightforward step-by-step build instructions in chronological order, you won't find it here. That said, if you love having plenty of options, and enjoy personal research, this one's for you! Good luck!
  4. I'd like to take a moment to say thanks to all of you who send along words of support and advice. This build is a monster! A special shout-out to Kurt Hauptfueher. His attention to detail is inspiring and humbling!
  5. The knees, horizontal beams and the visible stanchions are in. Now I'm carving out the two halves of the spar deck. A lot of trial and error. More trial and less error I hope.
  6. According to the instructions, sixty-two knees, that will support the beams under the spar deck, are to be jigsawed out of a single 5/32" plank. Since that sounded like a monstrous task to me I opted to make the knees by "glue-lamming" some hull planking left over from a earlier kit. Here's a few of them, shaped with the Dremel and lightly sanded. To fit the curved bulwark, each will have to be fitted individually.
  7. Lower deck guns, pumps, air ways and stairways installed. Ongoing touch-ups needed. The bottom half of the bulwarks should be white, but as they will not be viewable once the spar deck is in, the I've opted not to sweat the error.
  8. I'm back. After a two month hiatus thanks to knee replacement surgery, I've begun work on the items to be mounted on the gun deck. In the picture you can see a scratch-built chain pump and the hatch coamings. I've used some scrap to line the interior of the hatches. I was unhappy with my assembly of the galleries. It was my own error as I attempted to install them prior to fitting the transom. Lesson learned.
  9. Thanks David, Kurt and Glenn for your suggestions. I couldn't find shot on the Blue Jacket website and shipping from England was cost preventative so after a thorough search (and an effort to keep the cost down) I ordered a package of 250 2mm OD ball bearings from Canada Bearings. Hopefully that will do the trick. Thanks again for your suggestions.
  10. Hi Kurt. Great to see your excellent work here. I am currently working on the Blue Jacket Constitution as well and I'm deciding whether or not to create the hanging shot lockers that reside between the guns. I believe you opted to leave them out. Your thoughts on this? Thanks in advance. Jim
  11. Thanks David! I'll check it out. I was at Home depot this morning and found some brass chain that might work. It looks very close to scale when held up against the canons:
  12. I came to a complete stop trying to envision the "hanging shot lockers" that reside on the inner bulkheads The kit sketches are....sketchy. Sorry Nic! No convenient Google images available. To further complicate matters I was (and still am) completely flummoxed as to where to source extremely small (we're talking 2mm diam.) canon balls. So.....I pivoted and made cannons. :-)
  13. After two month's work and over three thousand individually applied plates the coppering of the hull and rudder is done. More than a few plates were removed and replaced to create a smooth finish. Now multiple applications or flat polyurethane. So far so good!
  14. The fairer sex and model ships....they both have mysterious and vexing compound curves. I was a bit confounded as how to apply a straight line to a compound curve until I picked up a piece of highly flexible construction paper and had an "Ah-Ha!" moment. I'm going to clean up the plates above it before going further.

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