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shipshaper

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    35
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About shipshaper

  • Birthday 02/16/1951

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Alamogordo, NM
  • Interests
    wood working, model ship building

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  1. Thank you DelF, yes I made both the base and the frame but I did not make the inlay, this was a purchased item that I installed on the base.
  2. Yes, it took 2 people for the large panels. Most of your statements are correct, the top was done differently. They are only rectangular strips that fit into a shoulder I milled on the outside tops of the verticals deep enough so the strip (when attached) make the outside edge of the glass trough (of the verticals) allowing the panels to slide in and out. Then the cover is screwed to the verticals locking the whole thing together. The total weight of glass would have been ~ 160 lbs so I went with Plexiglass which was only about 75 lbs but more expensive. I under estimated both the weight of ma
  3. Hi Andre, thank you for your comments. I am glad you like the case! Because I mill my own lumber i mill the bottom of the glass frame so that it fits into the glass trough of the base and the glass goes into the glass trough of the frame (I hope I am not confusing you). You cannot see it from the photos but when the top of the case (cover) is removed the top "stringers" of the case are flush with the out side edge of the vertical stringers glass trough so the glass can be inserted/removed by sliding it up or down. I use mirror clips to hole the top of the glass to the top stringers and when to
  4. Thanks Charles for the likes! It is Walnut that I milled myself. The base is Mahogany with a Walnut border. The vertical corners are not attached to the base. The entire glass frame is made to fit in the glass trough in the base (you can see the in the pics of the base). The frame is all mortise and tenon construction so I did not need either screws or nails, just glue 9Except for the top, that is screwed to the corners). Just sits snug as a bug in the glass trough 🙂..............Shipshaper.
  5. This was my first build over 40 years ago. Scientific R/C kit of balsa wood (needed to fiber glass the hull). Very large model with a length of ~ 48", height ~ 40" and beam of 12". I re-fabed the kit in Basswood, if i only knew then what I have learned know!
  6. Not that far from us, we are still neighbors on MSW!
  7. Hi Allen, glad you found this site as well. excellent information, tips and insight from fellow modelers around the world who REALLY know their stuff. I am excited to follow you! Mike
  8. Welcome and enjoy your build! Look forward to hearing how it is coming along😀!
  9. Hi Jeff, Allen and Dave are spot on. I am on my 5th model over the course of 35+ years and I'm still adding to my tool arsenal (and learning!). But when I first started I only had what I used when I was building R/C aircraft and made it through the process. MSW is an excellent source of information, use it and enjoy it. I will never be as good as a lot of our members but they sure help me in wanting to improve my work. Welcome aboard and have fun with this VERY rewarding hobby! Mike
  10. Hi Allen, Happy New Year everyone! I am just finishing the rigging on a very old "Aristo-Craft" 1815 Baltimore clipper 1:75 scale. I had decided to also rig the cannons even though the kit did not call for it. I must say it has been, let's say challenging! As I retired last Feb. I thought I could rip through the rigging and complete the kit in short order. As it turned out there is so much going on with all the static and running lines I can only work on it for a couple hours at a time and my eyes give out. I for one (at least for a clipper style) will look for larger scale ships in the future
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