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Boxbuilds

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Centerville Ohio
  • Interests
    Wooden ships, O Scale trains/dioramas, aircraft models, Tudor naval history, copper weathervanes

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  1. Chuck, Of all the jobs required to build most models, I don't think any are as daunting as taking a chisel to a keel for the rabbet. Talk about quickly screwing up, making a mistake cutting the rabbet is rarely recoverable (I know). The forums and build logs talk a good bit about the topic, and there are YouTube videos regarding the topic on real ships. Would it be useful to demonstrate the techniques from bearding line to laying a plank to installing a false stem? Thanks for asking for ideas and your unfathomable experience. John
  2. I assume the watch climbed the ropes without ladders to get to the crow's nest
  3. The detailing on this ship is great. How were the fine board line and nail marks made? Crosswise deck planking is different.
  4. very delicate trim. beautifully done
  5. This is a Midwest kit. Using this as a basis, I scratch-built another.
  6. I appreciate the scrutiny and discourse. Finding old texts written in a time when lost technology existed or was fresh in the authors minds, is intriguing. It's like being back there......eh, don't mean to be nostalgic. Anyway, I get a kick out of finding these odd examples and imagining modeling them -- as though I had the time! I will reexamine the gearing. The photos are unforgiving and screaming for improvement. We'll see
  7. Say you live near water that is shallow....like, roll-up-your-pants- and-take-off-your-shoes shallow with plenty of plant life. Davis was writing about how to build (not model) a shallow water boat with a ~7 inch draft to putz around in without fouling. He was pretty detailed in his directions and provided meaningful explanations for the design. I cannot do justice to his discussion of the drive rationale (including the dilemma of many chain-drives) so I just copied it here for you. I believe these engines employed a friction clutch, serving the dual purpose of engaging the dr
  8. The drive train required custom parts that I printed. The gears forced a change in the height of the axle bearings which required changes in the wheel size to ensure water contact. To ensure clearance from the rudders and transom a modification to the wheel supports was necessary. The paddlewheels are finished and will be mounted after the painting is complete. The bearings are slices of styrene tubing mounted inside a brass housing. Roof cross-supports are arches with a scale 4 inch curve. They're mounted in slotted basswood laminated with walnut. The curve of the si
  9. These are great examples. I admire the craftsmanship and artistry that went into figureheads. It's amazing that they have weathered time as well as many have.
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