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wefalck

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About wefalck

  • Birthday 05/01/1956

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    http://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org

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    Paris, France
  • Interests
    19th shipbuilding and naval history, indigeneous boats and their history

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  1. On a model you can reproduce this kind of spiral pattern by taking one half-hitch around the bar after another. By taking three lines in parallel you should get a pattern similar to the one on the top picture.
  2. I am wondering about the dimensions of your sheave, i.e. 2 mm diameter and 1 mm thick. This is rather thick for the diameter or rather small for the thickness. Proportions change over time, but a relation of somewhere between 1:5 or even 1:10 seems to be more normal. In a sheave 1 mm thick the groove would be 0.5 mm deep, which doesn't let much much material for the axle. Kit blocks are not likely to be a good starting point, as the shell proportions are usually wrong, namely they are too thick. I would check against sources for the period of your model. Otherwise, yes the lathe would be the best option, a rotary tool the second best. For a working model you may want to look into some suitably coloured plastic, as this is easier to work free-hand than metal.
  3. Actually Araldite normally keeps for many years. So either the ratio between the components wasn't right or it wasn't mixed thoroughly enough.
  4. Copper ions (can) interfere with the polymerisation of cyanoacrylates, so its use is not such a good idea. Copper forms in ambient an oxide layer (that feels slightly 'greasy'). This oxide layer becomes easily detached, as the glue/cement adheres better to it than the oxide layer to the metal. So the copper surface has to be made bright immediately before glueing, e.g. by burnishing it with steel wool, and then degreased, e.g. by rubbing it with acetone. Then epoxi cement and contact cements should work. It may depend on the formulation of the epoxi, as copper ions can also interfere with that polymerisation. If your expoxi does not set, you may have used not enough hardener or there is the problem with copper ion inhibition. It is never a good idea to glue parts on painted surfaces. The bond will only as strong as that between the paint and the surface that is painted. I would glue parts, such as the gudgeons before painting. At least one should scrape off the paint at the place where you want to glue something.
  5. Thanks for your kind comments ! ********************************** After weeks and months of drawing parts to be etched, I felt the need to apply my hands to something else then the keyboard. Also, I accumulated lots of little parts that at some stage need to go together. A step that I have been procrastinating, thinking that certain manipulations are easier to do, when everything is in pieces. When building a ship from scratch, deciding on the sequence of assembly can be crucial. So, the first step was to glue on the main deck, which had already been prepared a long time ago from a piece of bakelite. The holes for the various fittings where marked out over a drawing and then drilled. The translucent property of the bakelite is very helpful for marking out. Once glued on, the deck was carefully sanded to the contour of the hull. I spent a lot of time deliberating the best way to make the plating of the hull and the bulwark. The shape is quite simple, as the sides are vertical from just below the waterline (probably to facilitate the production of the armour plating that needed to be curved in only one direction). The original idea was to cut the plating in one piece from brass shim stock. This would have resulted in near scale thickness of the bulwark plating. I considered this too flimsy, even if the handrail was soldered on. Another option would have been to use 0.13 mm styrene sheet. Again I considered it too soft. Bakelite sheet of 0.1 mm thickness would have been closer to scale, but rather brittle. For practical reasons I decided to use 0.2 mm bakelite sheet. The layout of the freeing ports, the location of stanchions, the ash chutes, toilet drain pipes, and port-holes were drawn onto an expansion of the bulwark that was developed from the original drawings. The drawing then was laser-printed onto an overhead projection foil (remeber these ?). This foil was taped to a piece of bakelite sheet and the drawing ironed onto it, using what is called the toner-transfer methodBakelite sheet for the hull plating with layout by the toner-transfer method The plating was cemented to the MDF hull using cyanoacrylate glue (CA). I am not very fond of CA glue, but it forms secure bonds with bakelite. Hull plating attached On the prototype, the bulwark plating was attached to the hull by an angle iron (8 cm x 8 cm) running along the top of the hull. I simulated the vertical part with a 0.5 mm wide strip of self-adhesive aluminium sheet into which a row of rivets had been embossed. The horizontal part would disappear under a thick layer of tar-based paint that was mixed with sand and onto which sand was dusted to provide a non-slip deck. To be continued soon ...
  6. Squaring up the edge of a plank, when it clamped flat onto a surface with a spacer is actually a common technique. I made myself a little tool for short lengths, but this idea can be adapted to longer lengths: Here I use sanding blocks, rather than a plane, which works better for smaller scales. Likewise, one could make a 'safe-edge' sanding block to bevel the upper edge of the plank. As to marking off the planks as described in the video, you need to have access to the inside of the hull. Could be done on a plank-on-frames construction, if you are working upright and not upside down. Though workmen prefer to mark off on the real thing, on a model you better make templates from tracing paper, I think think.
  7. Gerhard, according to the dates on the files, it is about 3.5 years ago since I downloaded them. I did not keep the URLs. However, if you search in Google with 'Kameke 1837' they should come up. There were 10 files with the text volumes and lithographic tables at the time. The bibliographic references are: KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Sammlung von Zeichnungen die Einrichtung von materiellen Gegenständen der Preußischen Artillerie darstellend nach den neuesten Bestimmungen bearbeitet. Vte Abtheilung: Die Geschütz-Röhre und die Gegenstände zum Anfertigen und Untersuchen derselben.- 30 pl., Berlin. KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Erläuterungen zu der Sammlung von Steindruckzeichnungen durch welche die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie bildlich dargestellt ist. Ite Abtheilung: Die Lafetten, Protzen und Wagen der Festungs-Artillerie.- 118 p., Berlin (Naucksche Buchdruckerei). KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Sammlung von Zeichnungen die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie darstellend nach neuesten Bestimmungen bearbeitet. Ite Abtheilung: Die Lafetten, Protzen und Wagen der Festungs-Artillerie.- 25 pl., Berlin. KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Erläuterungen zu der Sammlung von Steindruckzeichnungen durch welche die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie bildlich dargestellt ist. IIte und IIIte Abtheilung: Die Lafetten, Protzen und Wagen der Belagerungs-Artillerie und die Mörser-Lafetten.- 124 p., Berlin (Naucksche Buchdruckerei). KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Sammlung von Zeichnungen die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie darstellend nach neuesten Bestimmungen bearbeitet. IIte und IIIte Abtheilung: Die Lafetten, Protzen und Wagen der Belagerungs-Artillerie und die Mörser-Lafetten.- 28 pl., Berlin. KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Erläuterungen zu der Sammlung von Steindruckzeichnungen durch welche die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie bildlich dargestellt ist. IVte Abtheilung: Die Lafetten, Protzen und Wagen der Feld-Artillerie.- 163 p., Berlin (Naucksche Buchdruckerei). KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Sammlung von Zeichnungen die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie darstellend nach neuesten Bestimmungen bearbeitet. IVte Abtheilung: Die Lafetten, Protzen und Wagen der Feld-Artillerie.- 30 pl., Berlin. KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Erläuterungen zu der Sammlung von Steindruckzeichnungen durch welche die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie bildlich dargestellt ist. Vte Abtheilung: Die Geschütz-Röhre und die Gegenstände zum Anfertigen und Untersuchen derselben.- 159 p., Berlin (Naucksche Buchdruckerei). KAMEKE, H.F. (1837): Sammlung von Zeichnungen die Einrichtung der materiellen Gegenstände der Preußischen Artillerie darstellend nach neuesten Bestimmungen bearbeitet. Vte Abtheilung: Die Geschütz-Röhre und die Gegenstände zum Anfertigen und Untersuchen derselben.- 30 pl., Berlin. KAMEKE, H.F. (1847): Die Preußische Feld-Artillerie nach der Konstruktion vom Jahre 1842. Mit Berücksichtigung der neuesten Veränderungen bearbeitet.- 72 p., 72 kolorierten Lithographien, Berlin (B. Behr).
  8. There are many more volumes, including lithographs, of the work by Kameke (1837) that can be downloaded from Google and/or archive.org.
  9. What about making them yourself ? If you have at least a hand-held drill, this is not too difficult.
  10. The darkening of light coloured threads is the same physical phenomenon as for wood: the pores filled with glue act as a sort of optical fibre, leading the light deeper into the material, with less light reflected from the surface and the inside of the pores. This is more or less unavoidable for deeply penetrating glues or varnishes. Low-viscosity varnishes applied sparingly do not fill the pores and, hence, lead to less darkening. I am using cellulose-nitrate based lacquer (Zaponlack in German), which is traditionally used to protect shiny brass and silver from oxidation. It is colourless and can be redissolved or made to penetrate more with a drop of acetone.
  11. I never use CA or PVA on rigging above all for one simple reason: things cannot be undone, if needed. I always use a fast-drying solvent-based varnish. A drop of solvent allows you to loosen knots and adjust the lines, if needed - and often it is needed.
  12. Kind of strange that the freeing-port cut through the rubbing strake. Never saw this before. It also means that the rubbing strake is not below the deck-edge, where the hull should be strongest, but above it, around the bulwark. Correct ? Keen to see the painted result of all these efforts ...
  13. Depending on the size of the hole, when cross-drilling round material or when drilling at an angle into surfaces, I start the hole with an end-mill that cuts across the centre. There is no risk of slipping with the point.
  14. My problem with dial-gauges on small machines is that they always seem to get in my way. The smallest commercially available these days seem to have 50 mm diameter. I think in the past they made it in 30 or 40 mm diameter.
  15. I gather you are talking about the running part ? You would need a hitch that can be tied while keeping the running part taut. As Jan said, a half-hitch with another one for security on top may go, or a clove-hitch - which would be my preferred solution, as it can be slowly untied while still keeping its stopping capability. Nevertheless, some research into how thing are done on mediterranean ships would be warranted.

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