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druxey

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    Niagara on the Lake, Ontario, Canada
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    Theatre, music, history, cycling, model making.

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  1. Would it be easier on your hands to carve the oarsman on the end of a stick of wood that you can hold or clamp? Then cut him off when nearly done.
  2. I have to echo the sentiments already expressed. Dan was a great model-maker - especially in paper! - and a vital part of MSW both as moderator and contributor. I, for one, will miss his posts and comments. My sympathy and condolences go out to his family. Dan was one of the good guys. Thank you, Dan.
  3. It was one of the Cyrus class 20 gun ship sloops of 1812. She was buit by Adams at Bucklers Hard. There are plans of this class of ship in the Royal Museums Greenwich Collection. (Information from David Lyon The Sailing Navy List.) See also: https://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?16413 There is indication that her hull was shaped on a French ship's lines.
  4. You are thinking of Neptune Hall in Greenwich. The Longridge model was in the Science Museum, South Kensington.
  5. That is a very good question, Mark. I don't know as I was not at his shoulder (now that would have been an education!) but common glues back then were Seccotine - a fish glue, I believe - and hide glue.
  6. Yes, the Victory model, hull only, was lodged underground during the war for protection. Longridge mentioned that there was mold on the surface when it was resurrected after the war for rigging. I'm sure that that didn't help. I saw the model prominently on display at the Science Museum in the 1960's and the model looked good. It was in a prominent position at the top of a staircase then. In the '70's gaps and cracks were beginning to appear. I assume they were partly due to low humidity. I suppose the worsening condition of the model since may be due to wood movement and glue failure.
  7. Steel, alas, is silent on upper deck port stops. Presumably they are similar to those on the lower deck. (Middle deck stops are as for the lower deck on three deckers.)
  8. One can never have enough storage, Paul. Shelves and drawers fill quickly! (Shallow drawers are more efficient.) I see you have a window with good natural light. If you are planning to work daytime, a bench on that side might be a good thought. I assume this will be only a summer-time activity. If not, insulation and heating will be considerations as well.

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If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

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