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Anguirel

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About Anguirel

  • Birthday 02/26/1979

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    Houston

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  1. Hi All, I read this thread with great interest and it answered all my questions except one. In all models I’ve seen the stichs that simulate the seams of the different panels are vertical straight lines. But in all the images of “real" sails this is a zip-zag stitch. Is this true only in modern sail making? Would it be wrong to use a zig-zag stitch on the sails?
  2. Hi Chuck, Thanks for the reply and if I may another question. I'm installing the floors and found some differences between the instructions and the plans. From the plans the bow floor should start at the base of the H frame so there should be a notch for the keelson (keel?) and it should be round and there is a space of 1/16 between the floor and the footwalings. For the stern floor it should start right next to the sternpost. on your build log the bow floor is round but not notched in the front and it looks like it's too high. On other logs some are notched in the front but are not round and all too high. Also all the logs I've seen the stern floor always starts at the frame number 7, not the sternpost. I'm I reading the planes wrong? Hugo
  3. Hi Chuck, First off all great kit, I’m having loads of fun... One question, on your log you say you filled the treenail holes. Can you tell me with what? Hugo
  4. Hi All, I’m on the market for a scroll saw. My inclination was for a Excalibur but they are no longer available. My question to you fine gentlemans is: is the new Jet scroll saw (http://www.jettools.com/us/en/new-products-and-offers/new-products/scroll-saw/) worth the extra $500?in the last toon to the Dewalt (http://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/saws/scroll-saws/20-variablespeed-scroll-saw/dw788). Christmas is coming so now is the perfect time to convince the Admiral that I need another machine... Thanks in advance
  5. Manage to spend some quality time in the workshop. Planking the inside is done to the level of the lower deck. The guide lines for the treenails is marked, next is drilling the holes and do the treenails. In the meantime I planed to do something different for the deck beams. I did a two timber deck beam with a table and lipped scarph. The one on the right is glued and with the black paper. It came out better then I was expecting for a first try. Now the problem is that the plans are made to use a constant thickness beam which is not the case of this one. Any advice on how to compensate for this? In the case of the lower left and upper right beam arm it must be shorter then on the plans and the other two it must be bigger... I could not find an example of a two timber beam on a model (found several examples of a three timber beams though). As for this one the cuts for the beam arms and carling will "cut" the scarph of the beam. Any advice is welcome... Hugo
  6. Hi, i haven't been able to spent as much time on the cross section as I like but I manage to do a bit here and there. Sanding took a lot of time and was the only way I could find to give the hull the right shape. Here how she look now... in some places I didn't manage to get a good fit but still learning I guess... Hugo
  7. Hi, today reached a point of no return, the frames are in place... with the help of the jig and the spacers it was easier then I was expecting. Still had to redo some of the frames in order to align them properly (that is where I am now...) I played around with patterns of the treenails to fix the frames against the keel... The pattern on frame B seems better but from what I read it was only adopted after 1811 (Sappings System?, can anyone confirm this) and the one on frame C was the one in practice between 1710-1811. Next is the gunport lintels and sills then sanding, lots of sanding... Hugo
  8. Finally finished the frames... I have the jig to assemble them ready (I built something similar to ChadB's. one question: is there a proper place for the spacers? I will post some pictures tomorrow
  9. Hi, I asked for a quote for boxwood with the thickness you sent but it was more then I was expecting and because it was my plan from the beginning to plank the all cross session and I want to buy a table saw and a lathe I rather save the money for the tools. So my plan now is to make the frames as they are in the plans and later when I have the tools I will make them "properly" and the decks only, with no planking.
  10. Hi all, There is a question that's been bugging me for months now. On the ship's frames were the futtocks buts weatherized? With pitch and/or tar? I know that after the frames where assembled the hull was left exposed to the elements (if done properly for years) so the wood would age and mature. But rain water is different from salt water... I could not find anything in the literature I have access to or the internet. A few weeks ago I had the privilege of visiting the HMS Victory in Portsmouth and on the Orloop deck there are some gaps on the inner hull plucking and the frames are visible. I could find one of the frame's buts and as far as I could see there was no pitch or tar. But the fact that there was direct access to the frames, especially in the Orloop deck makes me think that some kind of weatherization should be made. Can anyone confirm or deny if the frames were weatherized like the deck planks? thanks
  11. Hi Jan, I had mixed experiences with basswood. For Christmas I made a wood truck for my son in basswood and the edges look pretty good: But the other day I bought basswood by mistake to use on the Triton's frames and this was the result: The wood look chewed mainly in the edges and tops, so I'm assuming different vendors/ brands have different quality. The wood for the truck was bought in Jo-Ann and the other in Hobby Lobby. Anybody with the same experience?
  12. Hi, Since I I don't have the appropriate tools and and I don't want to spend the money to buy the milled wood (because I'm saving to buy the a table saw and a lathe) I decided that for now I'm doing the frames as by the plans. Since I was planing to completely plank the cross section it won't make a difference. As soon as I have the tools I will make another with no planking to show the internal construction. So today I brought back the pieces I had already cut, and assembled the two half of frame 0 (having some difficulties adding images using the IPad)
  13. The position of the bolts was subject to space availability. My guess would be to put it after the gangway bracket. Will the stairs get in the way?

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