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Found 13 results

  1. Hello all. Today i am starting a new adventure. I was long thinking which ship chose to build and decided to go with a frigate, it will be third build. Mamoli - La Gloire 1778. This ship is a classic frigate that belonged to the French Navy at the end of the XVIII century. The vessel was equipped with 26 12-pound guns on the battery deck, in addition to 4 6-pound guns, and 4 carronades of the main deck. La Gloire was planned by the shipbuilding engineer Guignace, and was launched at St.Malo in 1778. This model is a reproduction, scale 1:90, of the ship during the first year of navigation, with the bottom painted white. One year later, in June 1779, like with many other ships, the submerged part of the hull was sheathed with copper plates to protect it from corrosion. Kit is double plank-on bulkhead, with pre-cut wooden parts of walnut, mahogany, lime, beech, boxwood and tanganyka. Pre-finished fittings include wooden ship's boat, blocks, deadeyes and gratings, gilded metal for transom ornamentation and figurehead, brass nails and belaying pins, and finely cast white metal for the gun port frames. The 34 guns of the original ship are reproduced in burnished metal. Colorful flags, four sizes of rigging, plans and instructions are included as well. Intermediate Level Mamoli Kit No. MV34W Length 33"/Height 25"/Scale 1:90 Photos of the box and inside the box.
  2. Hello all. Couldn't wait and I'm posting these photos with the sole purpose of starting my Royal Louis build log. I'm under the impression this will be a real challenge. Box and contents shown. I know before hand I won't be using some of the stuff in this kit. Like those metal boats: Plan to purchase wooden kits for those parts. Blocks: I'm planning to purchase blocks from an external source. Rigging thread: I will make my own. Too many metal parts. Still don't know which I will use or won't. Will decide in due time. Actual build photos will come later. All you see in the photos is all the room I have to build. That is a blanket closet. I dream of a really big and spacious shop.
  3. Praefix: https://youtu.be/eduLvBaAbVs Dear friends of the re-use of the Heller SR kit! "OVER THE WAVES I AM EXCEPTIONAL" This writing was placed on the mizzen mast of her - and due to my honorable colleague @Hubac's Historian /Marc and it's distinguished work I am here with this second baroque project by pure curiosity to the overwhelming decor on the pick of the luxurious splendour - untill the laws of nature and naval arcitecture vetoingly entered the stage of history. Yours HdS, Berlin in spring 2019 The first ROYAL LOUIS we do know about with data giving us the oportunity for modelbuilding is usualy the RL-1692 - a less decorated ship than her predecessor from 1668. But our situation isn't as bad as we may think. This vessesl was called "Vaisseau du premier rang extraordinaire" designed and constructed by Rodolphe Gédéon and decorated by François Girardon at Toulon. Launched on the 1st Feb.1668 she was rebuilt in 1677, went out of service in Jan.1691, renamed ROYAL LOUIS VIEUX and was broken up in 1697 at Toulon. Measuring data: Length/pp: 163'0" p* (52,95m) L/keel: 135'0" p (43,85m) Breadth: 44'4" (14,40m) Draft: 21'0" (6,82m) Planed with 104 guns (1668): Lower Deck: 12 x 36pfd** 16 x 24pfd Middle Deck: 26 x 18pfd Upper Deck: 26 x 12pfd Quaterdeck: 12 x 6pfd F'r'c'stl: 8 x 6pfd Poop: 4 x 4pfd (There are some other data like length of gundeck etc.) Laid down in 1666 it was planed with the most possible amount of decor as Colbert ordered to praise the king by its ships. The propaganda machinery of the sun king's army of artist still influenced our point of view making us to belief in "royal blue" (sic!!!) painted plankings. But only the cartushes with the three fleur-de-lys were painted in the expensive lapis lazuli blue of milled semi-precious juwely stones coming to france over the silkroad. (This last two sentences are, what I want to show to why something is as it is andwhat is the historical od te hnical reason for this.) The RL-1668 is pictred on several prints,engravings or ink drawings. Herrich de or was a permanent source of trouble, as LeBrun was used to add a rich decor the shipwrights get paniced (knowing the VASA case) about the additive wight ant the high metrecentic point. So the figures were craved empty inside and so fixed. That the decor was cut down on the open sea to safe wigth (as Mondfeld told us) is not clear. But patrs of the decoation elements werde reused at the RL of 1692 - so we have to be aware of this fact not to confuse this both ships! Due to this I can use the SR hull as a basis and adding some fancy decor I might come towards my goal to build a ship of full french baroque decor. This before with the 1670th years a more unpretentious kind of decoration took place as SOLEIL ROYAL shows to us. There are some pictures, but no technical drawing. So here we have got the possibility to reconstruct the ship - it is clear to me this is the hard road to travel. But an less boring one than the typical o.o.b. builds. I really dpn't know where my journey will end - at the moment I hope to be able to use the Heller hull as a basis for the rebuild; but it may also be my purpose and my fate to end up with the transoms glory only as one a part model. As the basis is allways the Heller SR kit so it is a kit bashing how much may even be in there at the end. The lowest battery own 14 openings as the Heller hullSR - but the drawings of the galion are not very easy to decipher. It will only be a hull model scaled in the 1/90th. B.t.w. the MONARQUE is in the row of pictures due to her equal structure and the clearness of the drawing. She also is a contemporary example of the optical ligthness of these tons of white oak, colour and leaf gold. (I have to take any possibility to give my strange beliefs some historical footnotes.) This project isn't made as a rush in you workshop with an arm full of rolled plans and wood, entering the branch and after being disappeared in a holy cloud of lightning covered sawdust you'll leave it with a shipmodel in your hand. It is a arthistorical trial to reconstruct a beloved period of shipbuilding killed by strange-minded pennypinchers and small-minded safty fanatics... 😉 Have fun and take care. _______ *p = pieds 324,8mm (106,5% of a GB-foot) ** pfd\£[ivre] is 489,5g
  4. Hello friends, the second and less documentation equipped ship of the late 60th (XVIIth century) than the several SOLEIL ROYALs and ROYAL LOUISes is the other "1eme rang extraordinaire" battelship of the sunkings navy - Le DAUPHIN ROYAL build in 1668. Unable to find further more tan numeric data about hull, even some scetch of the figure head or anyother meaningfull view I decided to start a third drawing, construction and building threat. As she will base on a wooden hull the eord WOOD in the title isn't a complete porky-py. I felt in love to her opulent decor and castlelike design as the oval windows in the side gallerys attic. She also has six widowed tiers - an unicum in the naval shipbuilding design. We have one cintemporary pencil and wash drawing and a based on this Nucly colored drawing - I do estimate it from the late 60th tio the early 70th of the XX.century as time of birth. (The kings cote of arms with its thre lyses was missly interpreted as a face at the middel balkony!) I do like the coloured version but do miss the colourfull spots of the ordre chained framed cote of arms and the colourfull St.Michel on blach silk ribbon and Superior Orde de Saint Esprite on its sky blue ribbon band. As you can see the decor reassembled as the used ellemente reappear. My idea to imitate the Molierre silk ribbon band is to mask a matt colour surface and spray a part in silkmatt ("seidenmatt"). Also the cote of arms of the DAUPHIN are not correctly reassembled and the deep showing shadowing disappeared by transferring to the coloured parts. The decks are wrongly s traight flat and so I decided co take the scale as from the enlarged b/w copy to some 1/36 at a good 400mm breadth. This will be brought to the right scale oowhenf 1/36 (or 1/24?) when the drawing work is completed. This project serves to collect ideas anahowd workingbsolutions how to assemble a pile of decor and balkonies for the other projects bound at the Heller-SOLEIL ROYAL hull - also several designs shall be tested in a semi small miniaturisation. Here my copy in ~1/36 for the transparent papers drawings. And reconstruction of the side gallerys. All is a spinn off of the Heller hull based projects RL-1668 and SP-1693. Also here will be a huge ammount of drawing and guessing in tje beginning. The history of the last opulent decorated ship under LeBruns and Pigets building direction before SR-1670 will come to you in the next article as it is nearly 2 o'clock in the morning oof a labourfull Friday. Hope you like this troika.
  5. Hello friends, I'm starting a project here is mixture of research and building. As I came from the plastic kit bashing side of the modelling society I'm fed up with the chequebook modelling destroing any creativity. So as I'm in a new less payed job I changed my mind to a more creative and less expensive theater of the hobby: cardboard modelling. The scale fits to my flat's size. Sorry for my bad English - I'm not rearly far away from my school standards 30 years ago. Base of my project is the early Shipyard plan of Le Coureur the French lugger in 1/96. The little ship that was taken 1778 by HMCutter Alert - and what a nice and heartwarming thing it is that due to this find we have got the plans in the NMM. It is the basis of the Bourdriot monographie. The are three important sources of knowledge for me strating in the modelship's world: A. Petesson - Fore and After Rigging B. Bouriot - Le Coureur Monographie C. Friends of the Navy Museum - Plan (1960th?) (D. a www-copy if the NMM-plan) The Peterson shows the rigging of a bigger and in some details differing lugger from the same timeframe. The monographie is very good and well detailed - I decided to take the save route and ordered a new issiue at www.ancre.fr so the money was directly. with the drawer. And I was shure to get a complete set of plans. The Paris Museum's plan is based on the Admirals Pâris drawings and showing a simpler rigging with a diffrend decks layout. The NMM plan shows a superstructure in red on deck - the Shipyard kit shows hatches. Boudriot draws his particular part in dotted lines in one deck's sideview. I decided to trust in the NMM plan and in Ancre, too. So I've figured out the kitmakers at Shipyard followed the plan of the Paris Naval Museum. The similarity of the stern decorations are also evident. So the list of errors, carenesslesses and force to construct a buildable cardboard kit've born an intersting fundament of a nice little ship. As I'm not a francophone person, I have got my. problems with the texts in the monographie. But from all the three sourced it seems to be the one of the highest quality. So here some first impressions for you about the similarity of the kit and the Paris Plan. 1. The sternview of the ParisPlan 2. Some picture from the Shipyard manual showing the missing badge 3. The “KateWinslet leaving step“ in the topview 4. same area in the manual 5. my hobby ship yard. These as some first impressions for you. At the moment I'm struggling with the lasercut cardboard hull and its plywood filling I've get tip in a German forum.
  6. Hello friends at the very end I start my building log now as the project is ready and shipped towards my brother as his birthday present. And as he is not a member in here I can write without killing the surprise for him. I startet the project also as a testingsuite for a using of the vertical lines for the first time. These ships have a beautyfull appearance under full sail. As I firstly planned to build three level of sails I had to realize that this isn't possible as the boat was planed to be shiped. The plan is from the pilotsbook in French and a set of plans by Gehard Schmitt for some further detailling. I resized to match into a pair of Ikea frames called Ribba. So the scale is something about 1/72 and the model had to fit to the Showcase build from to frames and an inner frame from heavy rubber floor imitating some stone and balsa wood layout painted in Tamiya Sky Blue. As the model has only four weeks to be build I avoided too much detailing on the other hand. So the Schmitt plans were a temptation to overdo it and a obstacle to get ready in time. So here the first steps and my sources:
  7. 1:90 La Gloire - 1778 - French 34 gun Frigate - Dusek Ship Kits - MV34 Company: Dusek Ship Kits Kit No: MV34 Retail Price: EUR 349.- Available here: Dusek Ship Kits Description Classic frigate, belonging to the French Navy at the end of the XVlll century, Equipped with 26 12-oound guns on the battery deck, besides 4 6-pound guns and 4 carronades on the main deck. La Gloire was planned by the shipbuilding engineer, Guignace, and was launched at St, Malo in 1778, The model is the reproduction, scale 1:90, of the ship during the first year of navigation, with the bottom painted white. One year later, in June 1779, like with many other ships, the submerged part of the hull was sheathed with copper plates to protect it from corrosion. Technical data Scale: 1:90, Length: 840 mm Height: 635mm The kit 6 x Sheets of plans (DIN A2, 420 x 594 mm, 16.5 x 23.4 inches) 12 x Sheets of instructions in English, French, German and Italian (DIN A3, 297 x 420 mm, 11.7 x 16.5 x 12 inches) 2 x Sheet of model size 1:1 plan 12 sheets of lasercut wood (plywood and walnut) Various dowels for masts and yards Various strips of wood 1 x Photoetched brass parts Various cast Brittania metal parts in high quality Various Rope and all needed small parts (blocks, Pole, Chains, Fittings etc.) Flags All parts of the kit are stored safely and tidily in the box. Let's look deeper at this kit and start with the perfectly lasered plywood And we go on with the other lasered parts. There is one two layered sheet of photoetch parts A nice collection of wood For the masts and yards we get very nice dowels. There are also some pear strips for the build. The quality of the wood is excellent! More wood (see the perfect quality!) Let's check the smaller parts of this nice kit. The Flags Paperwork. Essential for ever good kit are the instructions and plans. As usually for Dusek you get the instruction in different languages. In this kit they are english, french, german and italian. The instructions are well done and an intermediate Modeller should have no problem at all. Last but not least there are two big sheets showing the modell in 1:1. Conclusion In 2016 Daniel Dusek bought all rights for producing of all Mamoli and MiniMamoli kits. Since then the kits are released in batches. So this really nice kit is available again for the passionate builder. The plans and instructions have not yet been revised by Daniel Dusek, but they do fulfil their task well and leave few to no questions unanswered, the plans are drawn in detail and printed in a great way. The woods are of very good quality, as are the metal cast parts. All parts are made of high-quality materials and you can see the attention to detail in this Dusek kit as well. Dusek Ship Kits currently lists this model for €349, and I think that represents really good value for money for this nice kit. Impression of the build model My sincere thanks go to Daniel Dusek for sending this kit for review here on Model Ship World. To buy, go to your favorite Dusek dealer or directly to http://www.dusekshipkits.com
  8. Par l'Ingénieur De La Morandière 1823 HISTORIQUE DES GOËLETTES & MONOGRAPHIE METHODE DE CONSTRUCTION DU MODELE this is the original title on the books cover but I'm working with my "working edition" copied from the english libary edition - because I can't spreak french and only guess some vocabulary by my rest of latin from school. Some months ago I borrowed the english edition from the libary and figured out there are more than five schooners awaiting the reader inside. I decided to buy the book because it is a very economical way to built a hand full of ships by one book - due to the fact that I'm not wealthy. And so I buyed the french edition pre-owned on the antique market with all the five plan sheets inside for all that I cannot speak french at all! So I payed again for the interlibary loan to get english-languaged copy again - copying it to be able to read it at all. I searched out three possible model ships for myself to get more difficult projects "to keep the challange alive" - going foreward step by step. So I followed the Monfeld's way of growng complexity in the chose of the paragon. I wrote to the Ancre publishers to get some more details about the sweaps for the boats and the oars for the aviso - because I decided to build her in a clam towed by boats. This type of model will give the possibility to me to show her full rigging of all sails and studdingsails set in an spiral order (after MacGregor "The square rigged sailing ships"). The spiral is the trial to catch any wind from any direction. And to use this moment also to give an idea of the size of the schooner to the viewer by using 1/48 figures at the oars in boat and on the deck. (I made mility modelbuilding for many years and so I'm used to alter figures to get them to fit to the situation they are placed in.) "La Jacinthe" is an aviso schooner built for the use in the colonies. The small armarment of two 12 pounder carronades shows clearly the were not built wor the battle line. The were built and used as dispatch vessels for collecting information and having an eye on the trade traffic. The schooner belonged to the Anemone-Class and the ships were in duty till the 1860th - some of them were altered and got an encloses bulkwalk and a one part gun lid from the hulls side up to the middle of the port. A problem I'm dealing with in my article about the "La Munite" in her appearence of 1833 ( http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/4810-la-jacinthe-building-a-variation-further-sources/ ). A picture added below. The shistership "La Topaze" doesn't had a topgallant sail and yard. She may have used the two triangeled sails instead. The dimensions are given in the original enlisting from the drawing below. A very good model was to see on the woldchampionship in Rijeka 2012 winning a C1 silver medal by the skilled builder Slavian Narlev from Bulgaria. So I'm going to tell something about her and my thoughts about my first scratch project - I'm going to catch as much information before my start as possible. Here are the plans sheets - all are scaled to 1/48! The very best point for the very beginning greenhorn like me is the planking is shown plank for plank in the sections drawing. Where to glue to the formers and how thick the pear has to be. Best for me may be to put a first planking of solftwood (lime/linden) on bulkheads and than to sand till the blood is coming out under the nails... to be able to add the second pearplanking on a smooth surface. So I start now to collect some information, ideas and perhaps warnuings from all of you - long time before starting the building. So I'll have a look towards my copies and asks some of the typical greenhorn questions.
  9. My next project is the Chaloupe Armee en Guerre or Longboat Armed for War. This will be a scratch-built model at a scale of 1:36, from the plans available here: http://www.ancre.fr/vaisso25.htm. I ordered my copy of the monograph and plans direct from ANCRE and they came speedily and at a very reasonable rate of postage. This is the first publication from ANCRE that I have seen, and I must say I'm impressed. The six sheets of plans are drawn beautifully and the accompanying booklet, which describes the boat and the construction process, is very well laid out. There are many illustrations of the construction process, as well as detail photos of a 1:18 version of the same boat. I should note that the original text was in French and has been translated into English by David H Roberts, who has done an excellent job. Whilst finishing my Agamemnon (http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/1115-hms-agamemnon-by-decoyman-caldercraft/) I have been collecting pieces of wood I thought might be useful when scratch-building. I discovered The Toolpost (http://www.toolpost.co.uk), a treasure trove of woodworking equipment, in Didcot, about 15 minutes drive from where I live. They have a good selection of hardwoods and fruitwoods, mostly in turning blanks, as well as a selection of pieces of boxwood of varying sizes. They were also happy to cut every piece I bought into 1" slices on their bandsaw. This means I can now machine them to exact dimensions on my Byrnes table saw, which is a pleasure to use! I haven't finally decided which woods to use where, but I'm starting with apple for the keelson and ribs and will probably use cherry for the planking. I acquired a box full of odd pieces of wood, including a large amount of ebony, from eBay for a very reasonable sum: I might try turning one of the ebony pieces to make the large bow-mounted cannon. The picture above shows (from the top) ebony, apple, box and cherry. Before I could get going on the good stuff I needed to make a mould, over which the basic hull will be constructed. The instructions say to make this from 5 mm ply, which actually measures nearer to 4.5 mm thick. Unfortunately French plywood is not available in England; here we have 3 mm and 6 mm, which isn't much use. In fact the nearest thing I could find was 4 mm MDF, available on the internet in packets of ten 400 x 300 mm sheets at a reasonable price. This is still not thick enough. The mould is made from layers cut to the shape of the waterlines, if the layers are too thin then the whole boat will end up compressed vertically. My solution was to interleave the MDF with layers of 0.5 mm cherry veneer, which I happened to have around, so that each layer was 4.5 mm in total. There were some benefits to this method: I could glue photocopies of the plans to each piece of veneer and then cut out each layer accurately using a scalpel. Once that was done I coloured the edges with a black permanent marker. This was so when I sanded the mould to its finished profile I knew that when I reached the black I was nearly there. The next step was to glue the veneers to the MDF and remove the photocopies. I left them to dry overnight, interleaved with cling film and weighted down, and then cut each MDF layer out with a fret saw, slightly larger than the veneer stuck to the top. Each layer was drilled on the centreline at stations 5F and 5A and then stacked up and glued in order with dowels in the holes to provide alignment. I used dowels instead of the drill bits because I could sand the dowels along with the MDF. There was a lot of arm-aching sanding to bring the mould to its final form. I used a Surform for quick removal and then coarse sandpaper on a block for accuracy. The end result was pretty accurate but not perfect. To check the profiles while sanding I glued copies of the frame profiles to 1.2 mm card, as well as the keel. I used these to check I was getting the shape right, but I also cut them so they would slot together. Once the mould fitted all the card frames and the keel I was just about done! In the last of the photos above you can see marking out for the recesses to take the keelson and the knee of the stern. To ensure the keelson recess was the right size I made a start on this piece. It's cut from a piece of 2.3 x 6 mm apple on the table saw, which I also used to cut the rebates for the frames. It curves up towards the stern so I soaked it in hot water for a while, then taped it to the mould. Once the keelson had the correct profile I used it to adjust the recess in the mould. The last thing to finish the mould were two coats of varnish and a polish. The purpose of this is to protect the markings showing the frames and the wales and to try to stop the glue sticking the frames to the mould. We'll see how we get on with this in due course. In the meantime the next task is to bend the frames round the mould. More soon! Rob
  10. Greetings, We just joined your guild and are looking forward to learning about several of the various topics. We've attached a few pictures of a ship that we just discovered during our stay in Europe. Does anyone know the history of this particular ship that is entitled "Villa de Paris"? I count 28 guns, not including the top deck of possibly an additional 12 to 22 guns. The model's hull is made of wood and it has some plastic accessories, like the anchors, etc. When we look at other pictures of "Villa de Paris" they appear to be of much larger ships with 100 guns or more. Also, any cleaning tips will be appreciated. For example, should we use oil on the wood deck? Any help or insight will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
  11. This ship caught my attention the first time I saw the plans because it had a white flag. Laughed a bit until I researched it. But then the lines caught my eye. She's a 32 gun, frigate of the 8 pound gun class. A bit of history... built 1755 in Brest. Not too much in the way of history available except for some highlights: 1756 - Carried troops to Quebec. 1757 - with Marsaint's divsion on the 21 Oct. A "most bloody conflict" with the British off Santo Domingo. No ships lost on either side, but a high casualty count. 1762 - expeditions against British shipping and the Sale pirates. 1778 - she was part of a small fleet in company with Le Belle Poule, Hirondelle and Le Coureur. They ran into Keppel's squadron. Licorne as surrounded and captured. La Belle Poule had a famous two-hour duel with the British and escaped to a nearby bay.For the next five years it was known as HMS Licorne in the British Navy. 1783 - Sold out of the service. From the plans, it appears to be a good beginner scratchbuild. Clean lines, minimal carving. Some things from the Hahn plans needs changing such as the mast caps and the cannon rigging. I'm still researching via Boudriot and Frolich. I'm planning on completely planking her, but that may change. Anyway, I ordered a bunch of Hahn's plans a few years ago out of curiousity... guess I was walking down the primrose path to the minefield and here's where I've landed. Not knowing what to order in the way of wood.. I guessed and ordered the wood for the Confederacy from The Lumberyard since both are 3/16" scale. Blew it a bit.. keel on the Confed is 1/4", on the Licorne... 3/16", same for the frames.. Luckily, I have a thickness sander... unluckily.. that's a rather large pile of wood. But, I'm happy. I'll make the frames a tad thicker and order some 3/16" sheet for the keel, etc. Next time.. I'll study the plans closer. So... here's where my build begins. Started by scanning and copying all the plans as blueline prints fade with time. Laid out but not cut the building board. I've enclose pic of what I've built to date: Pics of the Famous Ed Measuring Tool and my frame jig. Pic of some of the framing wood with my thickness sander (daunting in person). And lastly.. a work in progress... my shipwright. Currently looks like Krylon the Cylon, but he'll get better. Once he's finished, I'll properly name him and start building frames. Due to the website crash, all the descriptive stuff is gone. I'll post all the pics to-date and then start text, etc. on my next post.
  12. Hello Folks, I cought in the famouse X-bay two Breton Fishingboats of the first decade of the XX. century. The fist one ARMOR (A 1862) is a plastic kit from Heller scaled to 1/125 is dated before II world war, her the Box and the interiuere with out the booklet... the second SAINT GILDAS (GX 3864) is a wooden kit from scaled two 1/50 and is dated to 1908.looks like a variation of the Billing Boats Thuna Boat Marie Jeanne Lets start with the Heller plasic kit - the wooden one will need a little bit to come towards me. Christian, going to the bathtub to clean the model from the ress of lubricate by warm water & washing-up liquid

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