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Found 8 results

  1. And now the part you've been waiting for: What are we going to build?? Answer: We will build the 1/200 scale V108 torpedo boat from Digital Navy. Some reasons for this model: First, I have it printed already, and my printer has shown a recent propensity for not wanting to print on card stock, so finding a different model was problematic. Second, I have never built it before, which means that I'll have more motivation to build it, plus you and I will encounter the inherent construction problems together at the same time (all card models, no matter how top-shelf they are, have some construc
  2. So what exactly is a “card model”? A card model (more properly a paper model, since card is only one of many kinds of paper, though the terms card and paper are frequently used interchangeably) is simply a model made primarily out of paper. Many modelers are surprised when they hear for the first time that a ship model can be made from humble paper, but paper as a modeling medium has a long history dating back to the early 20th century. During World War II, paper was one of the few resources not heavily regulated due to the war effort, and paper models enjoyed a brief peak in popularity, ev
  3. At this point, most of the major structures are completed. It's down now to finishing off miscellaneous small bits scattered around the ship. I have some personal, general guidelines I follow (not necessarily to the letter) when I add these parts: 1) Work from the center superstructure towards either end, and 2) add shorter structures first, since tall structures are easily knocked off when working around them on the model. This means the parts numbering sequence is out the window. Of course, it has been for a while now, hasn't it? We'll start at the forecastle. Parts 54 are chocks.
  4. The tutorial I will be writing will use a free kit as its subject, but supposing you wished to buy a paper model kit, where could you get one, and who makes the best kits? The first question is rather easier to answer than the second, so we'll start by discussing the various publishing houses. Few card model designers run their own publishing outfit; usually the designers farm their kits out to one or more publishing houses. This makes it a little difficult to generalize about Publisher A versus Publisher B, because a designer might have his or her design published at both places. Lesso
  5. The tools needed to get started in card modeling are ridiculously few. Basically, you need a cutting tool and some glue. Everything else is optional. Here's some basic tools: You'll need a self-healing cutting mat, available from most office supply or crafts stores. Next, you need something to cut with. Notice the lack of scissors in the picture. Most card modelers rarely use them. Instead, your garden-variety craft knife will do the job nicely and with more precision. Get a good supply of #11 blades -- card can be surprisingly hard on them. A steel rule is a must, not just f
  6. Hi! I see the title of this thread has grabbed your attention. I admit I have a shameless reason for starting this series, and that is to raise the profile of card/paper as a modeling medium here at MSW. Over the years here and at MSW 1.0 a number of people have expressed an interest in trying their hand at a card model, and that's what I hope you will do after reading this series of posts. My goal is to describe the building of a simple card ship model in sufficient detail that upon reading it, anyone can say, "Gosh, I can do that!" And then, perhaps, you will actually go forth and do t
  7. The first armament to be installed will be the torpedo launchers, two seemingly complex and fiddly structures consisting of 16 parts each. The parts for these are conveniently located together on the parts sheet. Believe it or not, I have built models where this wasn't the case - go figure. There are two launchers on the model, one forward of the bridge, and the other aft of the superstructure. The launchers are identical, and on assemblies like this I prefer to build them simultaneously instead of first one, then the other. This is another construction sequence where it ma
  8. Before starting the superstructure, take a few moments to study the diagram for that assembly. The cover sheet artwork also has a nice view of that part of the ship. Assembly of the superstructure starts with wrapping the walls (23b) around the deck piece (23a). Score the fold tabs on 23b, along with the two fold lines where the wall wraps around the aft corners of 23a; after cutting it out, add the hatch door on the port side (part 55), Now here's another tip - if you apply contact cement to only one surface to be joined, it doesn't grab as tightly as when both surfaces are coated, b
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