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Found 8 results

  1. Build #3 First, a little background The Dragon Source: International Dragon Association The Dragon was designed by Johan Anker in 1929. The original design had two berths and was ideally suited for cruising in his home waters of Norway. The boat quickly attracted owners and within ten years it had spread all over Europe. In 1937 the Gold Cup was presented to the class by the Clyde Yacht Clubs Association. This quickly became one of the principal championships in the class and a prestigious trophy in the world of competitive yachting. LOA 8.9m Beam 1.95m Draugh 1.2m Displacement 1700kg (with mast) Mainsail 16m² Genoa 11.7m² Spinnaker 23.6m² The Olympic Years In 1948 the Dragon became an Olympic Class, a status it retained until the Munich/Kiel Olympics in 1972. It remains the only Olympic yacht ever to have a genuinely popular following outside the Games. Since the Olympics the Dragons have gone from strength to strength. The major reason for this has been the ongoing controlled development of the boat. In 1973 thanks to the hard work of Borge Borresen a G.R.P. specification was adopted, metal spars having been introduced in 1970. This proved to be a major milestone in the class's development. Designed from the first to compete on equal terms with the existing wooden boats, the GRP dragons are incredibly stiff - one reason why boats remain competitive at top level for years. More information: Scuttlebutt Sailing News – “Dragon Class – Stronger than Ever” SailboatData.com – “Dragon” SailingWeek.com – “ANTIGUA DRAGON YACHT CLUB CHALLENGE: MAY 8-9, 2017”
  2. Hi all, I'm doing this as having bought the plans for the cross section I thought I might as well use the full ship plans too. When I get time I will cut the bulkheads and centreboard. Til then please bear with me as I f I'm not here I will be next door on the cross section. Cheers
  3. All, Back to ships! With so many excellent builds of the Syren here on the site, I have decided to put my skills to the test and give her a whirl. I'll need all the help I can get, as this will be my first plank on bulkhead build. Looking through the other logs, I can tell there will be more scratch work than I have done to date, too. I am really looking forward to the journey! All parts have been accounted for. Plucking out the keel board, the very first order of business is to straighten it out. There is a slight curve to it, so I gave it a quick soak in water and have clamped it flat. We'll see how it looks in a couple of days when dry. The curve is slight, so filler blocks would very likely be able to set it right, but I like to make things a little easier on myself. Making those filler blocks is something I am not quite sure that I am looking forward to doing. Well, I can say this: my woodworking skills are going to get a workout! Onward! ~john
  4. Hello, one guy more building the Triton - as same in here do scaled in 1/64. As I'm completly unfamiliar with the complexity of a ship's riggimg I decided to build a hull model. As I do not own a lyth I'll use the information from the Gardiner's book "The History of the Frigat" to be free to omit all the 28 guns ad the swielguns, too. Yes I'm a scaredy cat. Tomorrow Im going to print and copy my pile of files in the copyshop. Due to the interst in frigats and my wish to build in a group I decided to take the nice Triton of the Meremaid Class. So I'm going to share my ups, ops and downs with all of you. I decided to build her in 1/64 due to the size of my flat, as some others also do. So I don't expect to get a Museums-able model out of my bonsai workshop on the one hand and on the other hand I hope not to get something I'll have to hide for the public in an open fire place. So I'll try to build something intermedium. Before the very beginning I'd like to have some more literature beside the Gardiner. Is there some thing you would advise me to buy for this build aside the AotS book of Diana I've shot at Ebay and 'm waiting for? Thanks for your help and friendly intrest.
  5. Hello all Here we go Welcome to my META 484 by Billing build Please feel free to comment or add suggestions There is just not much information available out there for the Meta that I can find - I found some photographs of completed models but nothing as far as build logs are concerned. If somebody has a possible source for any detail etc I could check it would be appreciated. Here are some which I have found: Meta Images and Meta images 2 For the time being, I have put the La Toullanaise on hold until I receive the planks and wood I ordered. I was just frustrating myself trying to do something and achieving nothing. So for now - I have decided to start the META 484 from Billing. This is an old kit [would love to know exactly how old] which I bought from a friend a good while ago and its been sitting on my shelf for the best part of 2 years - time to do something about that . Fortunately, the kit appears to be complete along with its accessories as well so that's a plus. And if needs be, I can pilfer wood from the La Toullanaise kit until my stock arrives - woods are similar between the two kits - and looks like they are from the same manufacturing era. First inspection of the kit revealed everything foreseeable to be present - most importantly, the PLAN! Opening the box. The wood appears to be VERY dry so I will have to watch that All the wood seems to be in the box
  6. The following is the reconstruction of my build logs for the Sherbourne following temporary loss of the Model Ship World Site in February 2013. First posted May 6th 2012. === It started with a birthday present in January of £200 from my daughter. What could I possibly want that would have some meaning over the year? I suddenly remembered that as a younger chap I had really enjoyed rigging plastic model ships, and had had a long-time yearning to work with wood. So on to the web, find out about ship models. Amazon for books, found 'The New Period Ship Handbook' by Keith Julier. It didn't give much (any) detail, but I thought maybe the Lady Nelson would be good. So researched that. Found this forum. Many days reading the variety of experience. Asked questions, thought about the Chatham as well, tried to get it but it was out of stock, so bought the Sherbourne Kit. My plan was not to go for the perfection of the other builds, but to get a basic understanding of the whole process, as I knew I would be making some frightful mistakes, and likely to be a bit messy as well. How right I was! Read all the planking advice on the Database, how to make filler blocks etc, then plunged in. Bought the kit, checked all the parts, stuck the tiddly little ones into the bags in the photo, put the frame together. Thought I'd be a clever little so-and-so and follow Danny's suggestion of inserting nuts in the hull to take pedestals at some future date. Even lined the bolts up with the bulkheads and epoxied the nuts in -- ensuring no glue was caught in the threads. All well and good ... so far.
  7. Hello, everyone! I've been taking some time to read up on all the planking tutorials offered here, and I'm trying to conceptually apply the techniques that I'm learning to my first build, which will begin in a week or two. I believe I understand the planking process in theory, but I've noticed that, with the exception of the "Hull Planking Techniques for Beginners" guide (http://modelshipworldforum.com/resources/Framing_and_Planking/plankingprojectbeginners.pdf), most of the guides seem to describe a technique in which each individual plank is spiled to fit the lined-off sections on the bulkheads. While this method seems easy to understand and certainly appears to provide a beautiful fit and a great-looking hull in the end, it requires you to use your own wood, as the spiled planks you cut out require stock that is wider than the planks that are included with the kit. This method seems ideal to me, as it puts less stress on the planks, and seems to make for an easier planking process, as long as you take your time cutting out each plank as perfectly as possible. However, I'd like to strengthen my understanding of the process used if one were to plank using the strips of wood included with the kit itself (for the sake of clarity, I've written my questions in bold). Based on the guide, it would appear that, in this case, you are to use the measurements of your lined-off bulkheads to plot a curve along the top side of each plank (i.e., the upper edge of the plank when the model is upright, with the keel on the bottom, as if the ship were sitting in the water). The top edge of the plank is then tapered along this curve (without ever tapering the bottom edge of the plank), minor adjustments are made, and the plank is moistened and heated, then bent over the bulkheads and clamped, where it is allowed to dry in order to take the shape of the hull. Once dry, the plank can be adhered to the bulkheads. Is this correct? From what I have read, the only plank to which this method does not apply is the garboard strake, which is tapered along its bottom edge to match the curve formed by the bottom edges of the bulkhead where they meet the keel. The top edge of the garboard strake (when the hull is positioned upright) is not tapered. Do I have that right? Finally, I'm curious about the wale. Is this where most people start planking, working down to the keel? Is this plank tapered at all? If so, which edge is tapered -- top or bottom? While I had originally assumed that I would simply plank my hull using the strips that come with the kit, I've become quite interested in the spiling technique, as the hulls I've seen that result from the use of this technique look amazing. My kit has not arrived yet, so I do not yet know the thickness of the planks that are included with it. If I were to acquire some 1/16"-thick sheets of basswood, would this thickness be comparable to the thickness of most first-layer planks that come with these kits, or is 1/16" too thick? I appreciate the help, guys!
  8. I started this project in summer 2012. I choose this kit after browsing and reading many of the build logs in MSW 1.0, and because it has only one mast (I’m not much of a seaman except in the rather romantic way of reading Patrick O’Brian’s novels for the second time). The box contained all the promised parts in an orderly fashion, and a very short/thin instruction booklet. But there is help: Watch and learn on MSW 2.0 (in my case especially from Tony’s Sherbourne at http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/335-hmc-sherbourne-by-tkay11-–-caldercraft-–-scale-164-1763-a-novice’s-caldercraft-sherbourne/) Download the construction manual of Caldercraft’s Brig Badger, it explains and illustrates a lot of the details (i.e. principle of hull construction, guns …) which are very similar to the Sherbourne (http://www.jotika-ltd.com/Pages/1024768/Manuals_Badger.htm) Buy George Bandurek’s book “Super-detailing the cutter Sherbourne” (http://www.grbsolutions.co.uk/5.html), an inspiring guide to make much more out of a beginners kit Keel, bulkheads and deck came first, then balsa fillers fore and aft. Then I soaked the plywood bulwarks before bending them with the help of tea mugs and a good bottle.

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