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  1. Hello - Thought I'd do a smaller kit so hopefully it will not take quite so long. The first steps done with the bulkheads. Next the balsa filler bits bow and stern plus a bit of support for the mast. The ply decking sheet dry fitted so as to lay the central planking with access to trim around hatches etc. It's good to see there are currently other Sherbourne builds going on at the moment so I'll be able to learn what to do. Thanks for looking in. Regards Doug
  2. Oh no - not another 'Sherbourne'!! Afraid so folks - and for the same reasons as many others. I'm a 'newbie' to the world of model ship-building so took advice by reading other peoples build-logs. So why this kit? It fits (loosely) with the period that interests me (anything from 1509 to 1815(!). It appears to be relatively easy (time will tell) but there is some scope for individuality (I think). It is relatively small when built (but I bet the 'other half' still notices it!) and lastly it is reasonably priced so if I make a 'cods' of it, I've not wastede too much money... Okay, hopefully apologies accepted so down to the nitty gritty... As usual with my modelling activities in other genrs I'll break it down into stages. That way, if I get stuck/bored with one aspect, I can move to another and then back again. For example, stage 1 will be the hull (logical) but stage 2 couldl be the masts, or (from the looks of them) the cannon trucks which might need a re-work... Doubtless there will be areas of disagreement, and constructive criticism is always useful. So... Stage one. Very much out of the manual... Framing dry-run Bow filler assembly Transom view initial assembly complete. Okay, day one (about 6 hours) complete. Next will be fitting the deck etc - which will also indicate some modifications to the hull... Watcfh this space...
  3. As the master studies finally reach an end (have to bring in the thesis next week) and I will have more time for the numerous hobbies, I have taken up the work on the cutter Sherbourne again, which I bought 3 years ago as a reward for the finished bachelor studies. Now, after three years of ripening I started the kit. It is my first wooden model, and I thought Sherbourne might be a good start, as it is not too expensive. As I forgot to take some pictures of the earliest building steps, I will just show you the current progress. During the first planking of the hull, I built some of the equipment (anchor, gun carriages and the gratings), but I have to admit, that I don't really like those gun carriages. It will possibly happen, that I do them all over again from scratch, as soon as I made a little CAD-drawing. The sanded hull. There are some errors in the 1st planking, but I hope the 2nd planking + whitening the underwater hull will hide them sufficiently. A lot of glue marks on the stern... Will be hidden under red colour I hope. Some pre assembled equipment. As already mentioned, I dont like the gun carriages. Regarding the anchor, I decided to fair the stock on the ends, as found in "Historische Schiffsmodelle" by Mondfeld. So far. As this is a weekend project, I hope I can provide you with more photos of new progress every week. I am looking forward for tips, maybe some encouraging words for a newbie in wood. Most of my modelling experience is strongly limited to plastic/resin kits.
  4. The following is the reconstruction of my build logs for the Sherbourne following temporary loss of the Model Ship World Site in February 2013. First posted May 6th 2012. === It started with a birthday present in January of £200 from my daughter. What could I possibly want that would have some meaning over the year? I suddenly remembered that as a younger chap I had really enjoyed rigging plastic model ships, and had had a long-time yearning to work with wood. So on to the web, find out about ship models. Amazon for books, found 'The New Period Ship Handbook' by Keith Julier. It didn't give much (any) detail, but I thought maybe the Lady Nelson would be good. So researched that. Found this forum. Many days reading the variety of experience. Asked questions, thought about the Chatham as well, tried to get it but it was out of stock, so bought the Sherbourne Kit. My plan was not to go for the perfection of the other builds, but to get a basic understanding of the whole process, as I knew I would be making some frightful mistakes, and likely to be a bit messy as well. How right I was! Read all the planking advice on the Database, how to make filler blocks etc, then plunged in. Bought the kit, checked all the parts, stuck the tiddly little ones into the bags in the photo, put the frame together. Thought I'd be a clever little so-and-so and follow Danny's suggestion of inserting nuts in the hull to take pedestals at some future date. Even lined the bolts up with the bulkheads and epoxied the nuts in -- ensuring no glue was caught in the threads. All well and good ... so far.
  5. Hi all so I thought I start a build log for my Sherbourne kit I did attempt about 15 years ago a model of HMS Victory a subscription one but I was young and was way out of my depth so give it up I decided to go with a modest boat this time after a bit of research I picked this model as a good start. Any advice or tips would be appreciated hopefully I can make a good job of it like all the logs I’ve looked out in here already to do with the model liam
  6. Hey fellow Builders! I've been lurking on this site for almost a year now and I feel it's time to reveal my work... or pile of poorly painted bent sticks. I would like to give my thanks for all the other Sherbourne builders on this site as it has been immensely helpful to see your builds! I started building this lovely little kit last August and have been working on it slowly over the last 9 months. It would totally be done if I wasn't working so much, I'm a line cook so I get home and most of the time collapse into bed. Anyway I bought this kit after doing some research, it came highly rated for beginners. I still couldn't have made it without the resources on this site or the books I bought. Most kits are just assuming you know what you are doing it seems. The kit was missing the maple wood for the deck so I contacted JoTika/Caldercraft and they mailed some out to me for free! The build is at the rigging stage... I've been a little stuck there and will probably ask for help. I'll just post these two un-boxing pictures for now and add the rest later in chunks.
  7. Hello all Now is the time to start my second build log since I have finished the Americas Cup Endeavour. I am more interested in warships of the age of sails so it feels natural to build Sherbourne as a second kit. The ship is not so big but still has all features of a period ship. The main purpose of this build is to learn as many skills as possible so I can not tell how the finished model will look like. I will scratch and replace many parts in the kit just to learn how to do it. The model will be of darker but better walnut than supplied in the kit. I bought it in a local hobby shop here in Helsingborg and I think it is Amati's replacement wood. As sources for the build I will use AOTS Alert, Rigging period for and after craft and other books that I find fits. I will also pick ideas from Chucks cutter Cheerful and of course from the very nice Sherbournes by Gregor, Dirk, Tony and Kester. I hope you don't mind I follow some of your ideas . Ps, Some of the pictures are to small. You will see the full photos if you click (open) on them.
  8. This is my first ever build of a wooden ship and Ihave taken my time before starting it.I have bought three books on the subject and found the last book which I bought 'Period ship kit builder's manual ' by Keith Julier to be the most informative and easiest to follow.I've read quite a bit of these books before I started my build with a great deal of apprehension.I don't want to make a mistake that cant be rectified so have also read the log's from other builds to see which way is the best to approach it and can hopefully learn from their 'mistakes' / learning curve. Checking off the parts against the list at first looked baffling but Caldercraft do a good job of numbering and naming parts. First dry fit of bulkheads with false keel and false decking to make sure everything is lining up. There There was a small dinge in the last bulkhead that had to be filled. False deck on and glued down Deck now held firmly in place and although not much to look at for experienced builders I'm chuffed with it so far. Now for filling the front and back bulkheads,this is the first one I've done and you can see the other side filled but not yet shaped. Hope I haven't made some glaringly obvious mistake so far,fingers crossed. Still not sure how to proceed when it comes to planking,for now I've left the keel and posts off as per other builds to make it easier but should I add the keel after first planking ,second planking and should I even rabbet for the planks.Seems there are different approaches to the planking conundrum. Thanks for looking all constructive criticisms welcome.
  9. Hello all, after reading several build logs here I thought why not, so here is mine. This is the first time I've built a wooden kit so this will be a bit hit and miss so please bear with me. So far I've just dry placed bulkheads and bevelled bow and stern ones.
  10. In order for me to understand better the rigging practices for cutters of the 18th Century, I wrote to the National Maritime Museum asking if I could see some of the cutter models they have in storage, now that they no longer have a model display at the Museum in Greenwich. Nick Ball, the Assistant Curator of Ship Models, wrote back very quickly saying that I would be welcome to visit and could see all of the models I had requested which are now stored at the Royal Historic Dockyard in Chatham -- except for one which was stored in another location less accessible to the occasional visitor. He, together with Dave Lindridge the Store Manager, gave me a very generous amount of time to look at and photograph the models that they had taken out for inspection – during which they provided a lively discussion about their jobs and the models they were showing. In fact Nick said he was pleased to show visitors the models because it gave him more of an opportunity to review models in their vast collection. I asked Nick about permission to post my pictures and he told me it was fine as long as I made it clear the pictures were from the NMM collection. He also asked to be provided to the links of the photos as he himself (as a trained naval archaeologist) was very keen on the details and would enjoy any discussion that ensued. I will post the photos of the individual models under different messages, this post deals only with the first of the models. I just need to add that I am enormously grateful to Nick and Dave for their patience and generosity with their time for this visit, which for me was invaluable. 1763 cutter NMM ID SLR0510 First off is their cutter referenced in the NMM as Object ID SLR0510. It is described there as “a full hull model of a cutter (circa 1763) Scale: 1:48. The vessel measures 53 feet on the main deck by 20 feet in the beam and is armed with twelve 3-pounders. The model was donated unfinished and was completed in the Museum in 1960”. For me there were four main points of interest, apart from the fact that it is dated the same year as my Sherbourne. The first is that the fore belaying pins are arranged fore-aft beside the bowsprit. Gregor, Dirk, Kester and I have been trying to figure out how the belaying pins would be set given that the kit of the Sherbourne provides no plans for such a belaying rack. Each of us have provided our own particular possibility – with Dirk going for an arrangement such as that on the AOTS book of the Alert, and Gregor going for a rack right on the stem. I had made a rack that was parallel to the windlass. However, now I have seen the arrangement on the NMM cutter SLR0510, and, as you will see, the 12-gun cutter I saw had the same arrangement, I have changed my own rack accordingly. The second is that the topmast is fore of the main mast. I had understood that earlier in the century the practice was to place the topmast aft of the main mast. In fact the cutter Hawke (which I also saw at Chatham and whose pictures follow in a subsequent post) was the only one of these models to place the topmast aft of the main mast. The third point of interest was the windlass. The original NMM plans for the Sherbourne showed this type of windlass, and Gregor has already made one in the same style, and I followed his example – rather than following the type of windlass provided for in the Sherbourne kit. The fourth point of interest is that, like the Trial that you'll see in a subsequent post, the lower hull is painted up to the wales, and not to a waterline. The following were the other pictures I took of the1763 cutter, all of which will have details which will be picked up by those more knowledgeable than I am! Tony
  11. As usual, once I arrive at the point of making a particular part, I find the details confusing. This time it's about the mast tackles. The Sherbourne kit that I have doesn't illustrate or mention mast tackles or Burton pendants. Similarly, the 1763 cutter model I photographed in the Royal Dockyard doesn't have any. On the other hand, one of the cutter models (1790) I photographed does show a similar tackle hooked to the base of the mast as follows: Furthermore, Petersson in his book 'Rigging Period Fore and Aft Craft' shows what he calls a Burton pendant and tackle as follows (though I have added text to point out the difficulty I have with his diagram): This made me think it might be a good thing to set up mast tackles. However, the moment I started looking at this, I thought that the diagram didn't make mechanical sense. It shows the runner going through what looks like a hook without a block -- which would mean it would have to run through a thimble. When I looked up Marquardt's book on Eighteenth Century Rigs & Rigging, he shows the following arrangement: This is very similar to that shown by zu Mondfeld and is clearly more sound (to my mind) in terms of mechanics. Marquardt also supplies the following information about cutter rigging (following Steel) -- the last two paragraphs of which I am at a loss to understand: "The mast tackle pendants were wormed, parcelled and served over their whole length. Each was doubled, and the bight was seized to create an eye which fitted over the masthead. The ends were then spliced together, and a single block was seized in the lower bight. The ends of all splices were tapered, marled down and served over with spun-yarn. The tackle runners had a hook and thimble spliced into one end and were served over. They rove through the pendant blocks and were spliced round the strops of long tackle blocks. The tackle fall was bend to a becket at the lower end of a long stropped single block, with the ends seized. The long strops, with hooks and thimbles spliced in, were hooked to eyebolts in the sides." Here, I don't understand the terms 'served over' and 'long tackle blocks'. I also don't understand which 'long stropped single block' is being referred to as having the becket for the tackle fall. As a result I don't really know whether it's right to put mast tackles on, and, if I do, whether to try to mimic Petersson's diagram, or whether to go for the kind of picture Marquardt shows. Any advice, comment or other will be, as usual, very welcome! Tony
  12. Hi all. I have just completed my first wooden ship build and, as luck would have it, my second project arrived in the post today. I am hoping for an improvement on my first attempt and, providing l learn from my experience, l am sure l will manage it. I have opened the box, identified the parts and dry fitted the bulkheads. The wood looks in good order as, indeed, was the first project. This build will, l expect, take rather longer than my first as l won't be able to put in the same number of hours per day as l managed on build one. We are taking the Grandchildren on holiday Friday so won't be able to start in ernest untill we return. Best wishes as always. The Lazy Saint.
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