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Found 82 results

  1. The next build. Before to begin the construction with wood, I want to have all the necessary information I need for the complete build. -I do not want to have to do extensive research -I do not want to draw plans -I do not want to begin in 5 years My prefered activity is to build and I want to concentrate on this particular aspect. V4.0 for the forth time 74 I will build a 74 guns 1/24 I will use the biggest scale I can manage. For this one 1/24 is 8 feet long. This is about the maximum I can easily manipulate. I would have love to build even at a bigger scale like 1/12 but I do not have all the plans I need. Jean Boudriot offers me everything I need. All the required information is available in 5 books, not 4 but yes 5. I am a lazy person for this time, I will not draw the frames; JC Lemineur dit and I will use it. So, I have all what I need to begin : -all the paper I need (the fifth book is in the mail) -all the tools I bought tools for the last 30 years -all the wood I need, at least for the frames. I did build 1 version of the 74 with exotic woods. If I add the price of all the exotic woods used, you would not believe how much expensive it can be in these quantities. Traditionnally, in Europe, they use pear wood for the frames and boxwood for the carvings. In my country, here in Quebec, there are no places to buy these woods and anyway it is too expensive for what I want to do. Here in Quebec, 1 one of the most stable wood we have is cherry wood. In addition the properties a re similar to pear wood except for the grain; cherry has pear has not. For sandinh both are identical. As a bonus, at leat for my taste, I love the smell of this wood when cutting or sanding.
  2. First step redraw the structure on CAD and making the drawings.
  3. Hi all, I am scratch building Le Mercure from ANCRE plans. I post some photos of my main deck. This is built off of the model and inserted later which makes working with the deck much easier. I still have further scraping and sanding of the deck - this is only rough at this stage. The centre strip (which will remain raised by about 1mm) is only temporarily held in place with toothpicks (which are not visible). Again, the ability to detach parts as needed (and not applying glue until the very end) makes working with these items far easier. My main deck is built in 3 separate parts but when joined appears as one. You will also see nails which I make with a syringe and Pear wood. I have several thousand of these which I will insert in to the deck in the coming days.
  4. After a long creative vacuum, I started a new project. This is the so-called "gabare" Le Gros Ventre at 1:48 scale, the model will be realized using the POF method (plank on frame) according to a monograph by Gerard Delacroix. I will use cherry, pear, black hornbeam and maple wood for the building, without painting. Gabare is a cargo ship used by the French Royal Navy during the 18th and 19th centuries. For this reason, there is no orlop deck. The first phase of the construction was the making of a building board necessary for the installation of frames on the keel. Great attention must be paid to the maximum accuracy of the position of the bottom and top base.
  5. Hello to everyone, this is my model of the 74 Boudriot cannon, the scale is 1:56, I started in 2001 by drawing the hull carpentry and soon after starting the construction, I start to publish the first photos
  6. Before I start my build log some information about the real La Créole and the data from which my model will build. The La Créole was a 24-gun corvette of the French Navy. The corvette carried 4 x 18 pdr guns and 20 x 30 pdr carronades. Her plans were drawn by P. M. Leroux in 1827. She was launched in Cherbourg in May 1829. The ship took part in the French invasion of Mexico in 1838, and most notably in the Bombardment of San Juan de Ulloa before French troops disembarked and captured the city of Veracruz. There is a fine shipyard model on display at the Musée national de la Marine in Paris which is shown by many photos in the book of Jean Boudriot (in French). I use the following sources for building my model of the corvette: Jean Boudriot - Historique de la corvette 1650-1850: La Créole, 1827 Now the images of beginning: To be continued... Best regards Johann
  7. It was in summer 2014 when I had the idea to build the French light Schooner “La Jacinthe” after the plans of Jean Boudriot. Together with five sisters she was launched in 1823, and in the following year five more ships were built, among them “La Mutine” (“The Rebel”). As my cutter HMC Sherbourne she should be in 1:64 scale, so I scanned the plans and traced bulkheads and false keel in a way so I could build everything with plywood of 3mm. For that I used Adobe Illustrator, so I could laser cut the pieces in the FabLab of the local technical university. “Printed out” in late summer, you can see here the bulkheads, false keel and deck, a few small parts and a piece for a jig that will help me to build a cutter. When I wanted to start building, alas, I saw that the false keel was totally warped. So I had to go to the university again, and cut everything again, but this time in MDF. And while I was at it, I did everything twice. Just for testing purpose I cut keel, stem etc., I will user these parts as templates when working with pear wood. In the upper left corner you can see a jig that will act as a bulkhead former. But why do everything twice? I simply couldn’t decide: build the “Jacinthe” or the “Mutine”? The latter is shown in Boudriot’s book, after a refit in 1835. The main differences are closed and elevated bulkheads, new deck layout, iron pumps and anchor chains, a steering wheel, new chains and a new bowsprit, set in a different angle – in general, the “Mutine” appears much more seaworthy than the very lightly built “Jacinthe”. So the plan is to build both: a fully rigged “Jacinthe” in natural pear wood, and a hull model of a black-painted, coppered “Mutine”. The twin build should not be boring or repetitive. Well, have to build two identical hulls, but all the other details mentioned promise to be sufficiently different from each other to make this a very interesting project. Here a look of the two schooners, “La Jacinthe” (1823) ans “La Mutine” (1835): The foundation is already laid: the two sisters can hardly be told apart yet. This will be a slow build, and quite an adventure; my only experience in building wooden models is the Sherbourne kit, which I modified to my liking and where I learned the pleasure of working from scratch. And as I have to do the heavy sanding outside, progress is dependent of the weather (yes, the with stuff is snow, for those having the privilege of living in a moderate climate). Cheers, Gregor
  8. The Le_Cerf's keel was laid in my shipyard in June 2014. In AutoCad I drew the bulkheads with steps in them for the clinker planking, which speeded up the planking with narrowing only in the bow and stern. To provide a larger area of adhesion, the spaces in the stern and the bow are filled with alder wood. First were planked the transom and the stern counter. I decided not to use paint, but to make all the details of artificially blackened hornbeam. Clinker planking is made of swiss pear. The carvings will be made from European boxwood. As this will be my first attempt at carving, I hope my deer will not look like a cow. I made the mistake of listening to the older generation of shipmodelers who argued that using the steps in the bulkheads will not let me lay the planking fairly. For this reason I cut the half-finished clinker planking (as it turned out, my method of planking was very strong - barely managed to remove the strakes) and completely filled the spaces between the frames with alder. Following the advice given me, I also cut off the notches for the planking strakes from the bulkheads. Now, in order to glue one strake of planking, it was necessary to use a bracing timber to clamp the plank and prevent it from slipping. Because of this planking became a very slow process. No more than one strake a day could be made, as I had to wait for it to dry completely. Also, the gluing area has decreased, because each board no longer lay flat against the bulkhead, but only a narrow edge bore upon it and on the previous strake. Only in the bow and stern, where the clinker planks lie flat on the frames, did they have enough surface for the glue. My experience convinced me that that the first variant is stronger and more reliable. I ought to have followed through with my original plan and learn from my own mistakes, instead of listening to the advice of the older generation, which does not have experience of AutoCad and laser-cutting. At the same time began to work on the keel, the stem and the sternpost. For these I again used Asutrian (pink) pear and blackened hornbeam. I am using a table saw for this, though, of course, this could be done with AutoCad drawings for laser cutting. However, the laser doess not give a 100% perpendicular cut and for this reason I decided to make the details by hand. Besides, this proved to be a very interesting process of fitting the scarphs and faying the pieces together. At this stage work on the model was interrupted in January 2017, as I was commissioned to build a large model on a tight schedule. After a break of more than 3 years: Work on the model was renewed in March 2020. This stage of the work on La Cerf is already being carried out in a new country, in a new workshop. The work will follow a new methodology and will tell about it in the proper order. At last I completed the clinker planking and replaced the walnut gunport frames with pear, as the grain of the walnut did not match well with the pear. I used a soldering iron to remove the old pieces and glued in new frames. The pear I used was kiln-dried with oak and had obtained yellow-brown color. The cills will be installed after the completion of the outside planking. Then began building the transom with the help of a frying pan, which had the right radius for bending the planks. For the construction, I used soft poplar and built a support structure which will hold the transom in the right position until the completion of planking. I have begun mounting the wales and clean the planking from glue remains and fairing the surfaces for attaching the stem and sternposts. The wales are made of hornbeam, a hard, but workable material that acceptable bending characteristics. During the long interruption in construction, the transition to the new place, a few pieces of the stern post and the blank for the stem were lost... At the same time I was building the longboat of Le Cerf. You can see the whole process in the video. After the completion of the clinker planking and the wales, I finally added the keel and the stern post. Only part of the stem was mounted at this time. The rest will be added when the planking is completed. It was time to nail the planks and for this I manufactured 3500 naisl. Hopefully this will be enough for the entire hull. Before I could turn over the hull, I had to drill for and drive 2175 spikes (this is only for the clinker planking and the transom). Placing the hull right side up in the stocks is a key moment when the model finally begins to look like a real ship. The next stage of planking would be more easily accomplished with the vessel being right side up.
  9. My new passion. The wood that i use are oak, moraine oak, ebony, padоk. 1: 36
  10. I am very happy to announce that the English language edition of my book "Introduction to Arsenal Modeling" is now available at ANCRE I am at the disposal of those who follow the steps of this guide, to answer any questions or queries about the topics addressed in the book. I hope this book will be of use to those who buy it. This is the link to the ANCRE : https://ancre.fr/en/basic-books/101-introduccion-al-modelismo-de-arsenal.html#/langue-anglais Adrián Sorolla
  11. Hi to all. Looks like i'm still here))) For a very long time I thought, wondered and reflected on the scale. And finally I made step for next level (scratch build) and i decided that 1/250 (Naviga C4 class) is what I wanted for a long time, especially due to i'm a seamen and 7-8 months in a year i spend at sea, with this scale I can make a model both at home and at sea. I present to you the beginning of the construction of the La Salamandre 1/250
  12. Greetings to all! Gaining more air in the chest, begin with an overview of the ship model "La Jacinte". Exactly one year ago I started this project, pre-assessing their own capabilities and finances. The choice of this prototype is primarily due to the fact that the model is repeatedly built by other modelers, reviewed many aspects of the construction, a simple mast and rigging, a small amount of artillery, and just a beautiful ship! Personally I really like the oblique sailing weapons! And so, to view!
  13. Ciao a tutti, Ho realizzato lo scaletto e sinceramente è stato abbastanza difficile essenzialmente per due motivi. Il primo motivo: l'utilizzo della linea del ponte per realizzare la dima di pontuale per i riferimenti delle coste e la seconda dima per il cassero sovrapposta alla precedente. Il secondo motivo: il disegno in pianta del ponte, questa misura non tiene conto del cavallino del ponte, quindi se avessi utilizzato questo disegno senza le dovute modifiche delle quote in lunghezza avrei ottenuto sulla dima di pontuale con una sagoma più corta di circa 5mm. Alcune foto dello scaletto. Se notate da una parte ho messo il disegno con la chiglia a pari e nell'altra foto si vede quanto il disegno è stato allungato. Hi everyone, I realized the ladder and honestly it was quite difficult essentially for two reasons. The first reason: the use of the bridge line to create the pontic template for the rib references and the second template for the formwork overlapping the previous one. The second reason: the plan drawing of the bridge, this measure does not take into account the pony of the bridge, so if I had used this design without the due changes in the dimensions in length I would have obtained on the pontual template with a shorter shape of about 5mm. Some photos of the ladder. If you notice on one side I put the design with the keel on the same level and in the other photo you can see how long the design has been stretched Dima di pontuale finita Scaletto Qui ho posizionato la dima del cassero Un Salutone a presto
  14. 大家好。 我从安克雷(Ancre)购买了这本书,并且已经从事了四个月的研究。尽管图中存在一些误差,但我仍然喜欢作者船上的每个细节,并打算在一年内完成! Translation by moderator: Hello everyone. I bought this book from Ancre and have been doing research for four months. Despite some errors in the picture, I still like every detail on the author's ship and intend to complete it within a year!
  15. Hello. I would like to share my build log - L'Artesien from Ancre plans in 1:48 scale.
  16. About the model: As they say, "No time like the present" and as I'm stalled on Licorne by several non-hobby issues, I'm starting this one to take my mind off things. I have the plans scaled down from 1:48 to 1:64 I'll be drafting plans for building the ship as the ANCRE monograph doesn't have drawings pre-made for such things a frames, keel, etc. As the title states it will be a POB build as there's next to nothing in the plans of the below deck area. I'm making decisions at this point will working on lofting the bulkheads, keel, etc. on the types of woods. Most likely I'll Swiss pear for the external planking, some ebony or ebony stained wood for the wales and other bits and pieces, boxwood for the keel, stern post, and bowspit. Not sure yet about the decks. As for the bulkheads and some internal bits that won't be seen, I'm deciding whether to use Baltic Birch plywood or Yellow Ceder. It may come down to cost on this though. I'll be using the DeathStar for at least marking the wood to be cut for the bulkheads but not ruling out cutting as that will depend on the wood selection. I selected this ship as "next" as it was the more famous of the ships involved in the battle that brought the French into American Revolutionary War. Here's the history of Belle Poule and some pictures of the plans and the monograph. La Belle Poule is a 12-pounder class of frigate with 26 12-pdrs on the gun deck and 10 6-pdrs on the forecastle and sterncastle. History: La Belle Poule was built in the shipyard at Bordeaux starting in 1765 and launched in 1767. \ From 1772 to 1776, she was on hydrographic missions around India. She returned to Brest in 1776 . At the time, France wasn't engaged in War, but there were numerous incidents. April, 1777, Belle Poule was chased by a British ship of the line (unknown which one) and after evading her, returned to Brest. December, 1777, Belle Poule transported Silas Deane back to America along with the news of the French-American Alliance. On 7 January, 1778, she was stopped by two Britich ships of the line which demanded to inspect her and her Captian, Charles de Bernard de Marigny replied: "I am the Belle Poule, frigate of the King of France; I sail from sea and I sail to sea. Vessels of the King, my master, never allow inspections." 17 June, 1778. The famous battle between Belle Poule and Arethusa occurred which was actually celebrated by both countries. It was this battle that brought France into the American Revolutionary War. Note that Licorne was captured by the British. After this battle, she did numerous patrols. 14 July 1780. Belle Poule was overhauled and after a two hour battle with Noncuch (64), she surrendered. Feburary, 1781. Belle Poule was commissioned by the British. She participated in the Battle of Dogger Bank later that year. A footnote is that her Master during this period was William Bligh. November 1782. Belle Poule went to ordinary and also served as a British recieving ship. 1801. She was sold off. Plans, etc. I'm using the following references: Le Belle Poule Monograh by Boudriot and Berti The Art of Ship Modeling by Frolich and lastly, the only build log I could find that actually is showing the process unlike most that just show the finished ship: https://5500.forumactif.org/t3216-la-belle-poule-de-1765-au-1-48-par-guydal Anyway, a bit long winded but I'll be back when I have my cut sheets, plans, etc. ready and start making sawdust.
  17. I started my new project, a little ambitious, on an almost impossible scale: I always admired extremely small models, always convinced that it would have been an impossible job for me. It's a challenge against myself! Obviously I started from the keel and it is already difficult to be able to keep the straight line.
  18. Hello Model Friends. After much research and more considerations, I decided to build the model of the "ROYAL CAROLINE 1749". The history of the Royal Caroline has been written x times, so I'll give up on more details. After the sparse construction drawings, as well as various to scale without drawings in the book by AotS I have strong doubts about the success of the project, but I try it anyway. The plan drawings by Boudriot, Delacroix from ANCRE publishing house, on the other hand, are top class in their own right, i very first cream. Thanks Mike for the help of the frame drawings. To the model: Scale: 1/48 Wood: German Elsbeere Overall lenght: 655,0 mm I will build the model with visible frames from the second barwood, as well as the interior. I have already installed the "backbone" of the model on/in the slipway building board. There are no photos of the individual parts, smoothly forgotten. Next step is the construction of forty-five douple frames, each frame consists of twelve parts, so I am busy in the near future. Karl (Sorry, Google translator)
  19. Hello, Dear ship modelers! My name is Kudin Andrey. I was born and grew up in Ukraine, now I live in Israel. I am pleased to be among you, because I am building a model of a beautiful ship. Construction began here: MODELS WORLD Then I continued building here: ВЕРФЬ НА СТОЛЕ (Verf na stole) At some point, I had an interest in video building on YUTUB: LE FLEURON (YouTube) At the moment, the channel has a number of series from ...FILM 1... to ...FILM 71 Understanding that not everyone speaks Russian, I CORRECT the subtitles (creeping line) so that I can be understood in other countries ... All you have to do is translate the subtitles language in the settings under video. I am interested in communication with the viewer and knowledgeable people, because this will help me build a model! I will inform you about the release of new series and, I hope, it will be interesting to you ... And in order to prove that I am not a shoemaker, I offer some photos of the model ... Thank you!
  20. My New project is the St Caterina. It is a Mediterranean fishing vessel. Plans from Ancre. I started it since October and is well advance so far. I decided this time to go after a old fashion diorama New tech to aging wood (At least for me) New tech for nails (Also at least for me) Please don't hesitate to make comments
  21. It's a very interesting ship with detailed information
  22. La Salamandre 1:24 http://www.koga.net.pl/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=45782
  23. Hello model shipbuilders! Here is my latest build log. I started this project early last year and now I decided to share it with you. The build is based on Boudriot's monograph "Le Coureur". There were several things I found very interesting when I decided to build this model: the sail plan the clinker planking of the hull - I've never done one before and the acceptable size and complexity I plan to do a fully rigged model. Everything will be scratch built except the guns and the gun carriages which were bought from SyrenShipModelCompany.com
  24. Hello everyone ! My name is Patrick, 64, retired for 4 years soon and living in Poissy, a small town located 30 km west of Paris. I have been watching your works on this forum for several years now and as some of my compatriots are doing, I would like to show you a project I started four years ago : a French frigate named "La Renommée". I work from a monograph by Jean BOUDRIOT, the scale is 1/48. At this stage, I just finished the hull and I will show you some pictures without too many comments, the pictures speaking for themselves ... and moreover, my "English" is a bit "rusty". I will go in stages, to condense 4 years of work in a few days of publication. So let's go ... [/url Patrick

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