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Found 47 results

  1. ***Santa Maria 1492 - Artesania Latina*** Hello shipmates, Before we are getting started with my new buildlog, a short introduction of myself and the ship is in order. I'm a member of this forum for many years, and I live in The Netherlands a small country in Europe. Once we were dominating the world seas by having more ships in the water as a nation then all ships from all countries combined. So ships and shipbuilding runs through the veins so to say. Unfortuately after the big crash of MSW all my photo's and my buildlogs were gone. For a few years I put my hobby asside and concentrated on my family and on my work. At this moment I've found some spare hours to work on my hobby, and I would like to share my new buildlog with you guys and gals. please have a bit patience on my written English, because it's not my native language and so I'll probably make some grammatical mistakes and I appologies upfront... To the project... History The Santa Maria originally named La Gallega, was the largest of the three ships used by Christopher Columbus in his first voyage. Her master and owner was Juan de la Cosa. She was built in Pontevedra, Galicia, in Spain's north-west region. Santa Maria was probably a medium-sized nau (Carrack), about 58ft long on deck, and according to Juan Escalante de Mendoza in 1575, SM was "very little larger than 100 toneladas" (about 100 tons, or tuns). She was the flagship for the expedition aside La Nina and La Pinta, two smaller of the caravel-type ships. Shipwreck With three masts, Santa María was the slowest of Columbus' vessels but performed well in the Atlantic Ocean crossing. Then on the return trip, on 24 December (1492), not having slept for two days, Columbus decided at 11:00 p.m. to lie down to sleep. The night being calm, the steersman also decided to sleep, leaving only a cabin boy to steer the ship, a practice which the admiral had always strictly forbidden. With the boy at the helm, the currents carried the ship onto a sandbank, running her aground off the present-day site of Cap-Haïtien, Haiti. It sank the next day and was lost forever... The build At first, let's inspect the workplace, which is the kitchen table by the way, and the box...and yes, the box on the left is my toolkit and on the right the ship... Everything looks neat and tidy at first glance. The box is well organized and the wooden parts and timber are of a good quality as can be expected from AL. However, the buildmanual turns out to be very dissapointing. A few photo's on one single page and an instruction list is all that's added to the box. The best parts are the two bigger drawings of the rigging and masts which looks very nice doh. The Bulkheads and false keel / keelplate I start by numbering all the bulkheads and parts on the plate. They are all lasercut and I use some sandpaper to remove the burn from the laser. After inspecting a collect all the parts and dry-fit them together to see how good it fits.....it doesn't! After some corrections, the bulkheads fits nicely on the false keel. However I noticed a small warp in the keelplate. I did some further inspection and Yes, it's warped just between bulkhead 12 and 10. This needs to be fixed otherwise I run into some problems later on....I took the keel plate and soaked it in some water. I let it dry between a couple of books with some pressure on the books so the plate was fixed into a flat position. I let it dry for a day and the next day it was straight. I put everything together again and glued the bulkheads into position. The false deck Next step is to place the false deck on top of the bulkheads. Again, the false keel was pre-fabricated and lasercut. I use the small brass nails and glue to fixate the plate on to the bulkheads. I have limited tools and clamps at my posession at this moment, so I use the nails. They will be coverd up later when the final layer of thin wooden strips are placed on top of the false deck. Overhere I use a nail (red circle) to "help" the deck plate a litte bit and guides it into a better position.... After his I placed some blocks to make the bow a bit stronger and sturdier. Now it's time to sand the end of the bulkhead so they are prepared for planking the first layer of the hull. It will be a dual layered or planked hull. I took my time on this process. If done correctly, the beauty of the lines and shape of hull will shown after the planking process. It is also the part were I struggle the most and we'll have to see later on if I made some mistakes or not... So, to be continued soon.... regards, Peter
  2. I decided to take the plunge to see if I could put together a wooden model ship kit. Apparently it's in my genes. My great grandfather once acquired blueprints from the Library of Congress to build a scale version of the Sovereign of the Seas. I'm definitely not reaching that high yet. Alas, I'm also not one to start with something simple. Nope. I like to know I'll get a challenge or two and expand my selection of colorful metaphors when confused. I went with the Artesania Latina Virginia 1819 kit. I really enjoy the look of it and thought it might reside in my office at work. So here she is thus far. I'm taking my time and enjoying figuring out how something is done. For instance, I looked at different ways to approach the deck planks. I opted to avoid going with the long deck planks. Rather, I went with 10mm sections and at first tried to alternate placement to give it a more realistic look but somehow I lost my place. Thus, it's a wee bit off. That's okay. I figured this is the ship I'm going to learn on so there will be more mistakes. In the end I'll look at it like I look at my woodworking projects: "complete with flaws and awl." Now I'm reading about soaking wood planks and other options for planking the hull. Think I'm going to soak a plank, bend it into place while damp, and clamp it into place letting it stay like that overnight. The next day I'll unclamp it, glue it, and tack it down. It'll be slower but from what I'm seeing on other posts that seems to be a good method. We'll see. Many thanks for looking!
  3. I'm doing this thread on the HMS Victory which is the current project. I've made good progress on construction, but I'm going to put the construction steps here and let it react before posting the next ones. All texts are those of a French forum, simply translated by Google Translate. Excuse me in advance for grammatical mistakes or syntax ... (2016, December) I have the Artesiana Latina kit at 1/84. The skeleton is mounted, I must attack the hull. This boat once mounted must be about 1m25: big bug! But before plunging headlong into curling for a very long time, I do as usual, a pause to think about what I want, what is done, how to tint, mount, etc ... For this, I gather a large library of models, photos of Victory, various docs. In the kit, no plan to scale, but a dvd and prints format A3. It bothers me a little not to "see" it in real size ... Moreover, I saw many Victory perfectly realized ... it does not interest me to remake! These two facts pushed me to wonder about this boat. I looked for a monograph close to the scale, I just ordered the monograph of the Superb at the AAMM (Association of Friends of the Navy Museum): a 74 french guns of the 18th. Conclusion: I will not do the real HMS Victory! But I will use this base to make a three masts of the eighteenth ... I will choose my colors and shades, change the castle, adapt a balcony or 2, perhaps redo bottles, adapt the kit in fact. I am going to make MY model respecting the historical codes, but not a copy of this ship. Of course, I will use the elements of the kit, but I will extrapolate according to my desires. In short, we'll see! Here is the end of sanding couples and keel (a long time to do everything clean), gluing the whole and a first bridge just screwed to maintain properly and check the squareness (2 couples deformed on the top, but nothing irrattrapable). I have a little attacked the sanding to border, but this step will be long, I will be very careful and take my time. It's so important to place strakes next.
  4. This was my very first build. It is the original version of the San Francisco, not to be confused with the San Francisco II, there are slight differences, the main one being the hull which is double planked with basswood and Sapeli veneer, whereas the San Fran II is single planked with mahogany. I didn't like the gun carriages that came with the kit and with help from other members made my own which were more in keeping with the era of the ship. I also made changes to the rigging, the kit instructions, for me, were too simplified so I did a lot of research and added more accurate rigging. I learnt a lot from this build and she now sits in pride of place in my lounge. The box: The Box: Inside the box: First the bulkheads were dry fitted, checking for fit and adjusting if neccessary before gluing in place. It is important to make sure the keel is straight and the bulkheads are at a 90deg angle to the keel to prevent problems with planking later.
  5. The first images of my build. I have just about completed the initial hull planking, just need to add the rubbing strakes but first need to fit the second lining to the hull. I had considered rigging up a kit that would allow me to both support the hull and keep the planking in place while the glue dried. This was the reason I ended up here yesterday. I got some input but any ideas would be most welcome.
  6. Greetings all, I am in the process of making my first attempt at building a wooden ship. The kit i have started on is the "King of the Mississippi" by Artesania Latina. I look forward to advice as I progress.
  7. First build here, i read somewhere that the first kits have detailed instructions that build your knowledge base to know how to fill in the blanks when it comes to the less detailed instructions on the larger / more complex kits.. if that's the case I sure am glad i started with this little guy because i'm really struggling with the instructions! The miniature furniture kits / scratch-build tutorials i've worked off of have been drowning in detail. The build was going reasonably smoothly until I got the planking, where the instructions call for installing the sheeting, after rummaging through the kit a few times looking for a sheet of planks I decided it must be another name for strip wood. I didn't question this until i was securing the deck and the spacing between planks grew out of scale that I started second guessing and, digging through the kit one more time, found a pile of veneer strips - at this point i'm not sure if i've used my hull materials as planking or not! The images all appear to be strip wood, so i'm going to carry on and assume everything is fine. It's incredibly difficult to tell from any of the images online which wood was used, i seem to be the only one having this existential crisis. Yesterday was spent sanding / sealing the decks and today I will tackle filing down the ribs so I can start working on the hull.
  8. I want to put some led lights in this kit, so I will try to bash it a bit. First I will leave the doors open, so I have to make the cabins look more realistic. I cut some parts from the hull sections stern view bow stern cabin main deck Captain's quarters, windows will be real so you can take a look inside cabin, hopefully I will make some furnitures
  9. After a long break I have returned to the world of model ship building. I decided to start with a simple build so I purchased the Artesania Latina kit for the Scottish Maid, revisiting the first ship I (badly) a few years ago. I seem to recall the instructions were a bit vague and the translation to English leaves a lot to be desired in places. I noted the kit was missing the deck planking materials, which I had noted other builders had also commented on therefore I purchased some suitable deck planking material from CMB. I plan to enhance some aspects of the build.
  10. Open the box! First impressions; Artesania Latina do not appear to have the best of reputations, and on doing research, to find out that the Bounty kit is only single plank on frame rather than the more acceptable double planking, didn't help that reputation. Aparently the manuals weren't up to much either, badly translated for one thing (AL are Italian of course), and I did come across veiled suggestions the kit quality had a lot to be desired. However the ship had already been ordered, a gift from my children, so there was no going back, the box arrived... ...and what an impressive box it was to! 30 x 17 x 2.5 inches (76 x 43 x 7 cms) and heavy with it. On opening the box, I couldn't help but be quite impressed. At the top of the pile was a package containing the manuals (yes two!) and the drawings. The manuals were relatively impressive, the first was a full colour and seemingly very detailed book containing a host of photographs each part in each photograph numbered. The second manual was the instruction booklet (in several languages). Each paragraph in the manual makes reference to each photograph, thereby illustrating every step, but how accurately remains to be seen. So far, quite impressed. I was then shocked to discover how huge the actual scale drawings were! Given the box is 30 inches long, the size of the drawing is indicated in the photograph below. There are three sheets, but each has content on both sides, and very detailed content it appears to be. So far very impressed. Then the rest of the contents. The usual laser cut sheets of different thicknesses of wood, all seemingly excellent quality, and the wooden strips and dowling. It became obvious the ship only has single planking, as the obvious keel planking strips seemed relatively few. The other contents included all the many bits and pieces, all neat and tidy in individual plastic trays rather than plastic bags! I later discovered these trays are actually quite robust and reusable, which should prove very handy. The qualty of the components, especially the turned brass ones, appeared excellent. Still impressed! Eventually I did make a start on the build. As I was still finishing my previous ship, I only undertook this because the instructions recommended, for absolute realism, the first keel items should be stained and varnished before being built, and I could continue with my original ship as this was drying. As it transpired I have elected to paint then varnish, as the stain didn't cover the imperfections of the wood. As the painting / varnishing could be done after the initial bit of build, I did actually commence. The pIeces; false keel and first frames, were removed from their sheet easier than any I have come across before, and the quality seems very good indeed. The frames all fitted into the keel well. Now to paint and varnish. Bryan
  11. Hi there. This is my first post on this forum so apologies for any missteps... From what I can see this is an Occre/Artesania Latina kit and it seems to be sort of a generic build as I haven't been able to locate any references to a ship that existed under this name. This is my second kit, the first one being a Mantua kit that was a disaster and I abandoned. I've never done any sort of woodworking or model work so this is all pretty new to me. I bought this kit back in December 2017 and have been working on it with small breaks since then. At the time of posting this I have already finished most of this structure. Regarding this kit: Good points: - Ideal beginner's kit that is not too hard but provides enough of a challenge. Bad points: - Illustrated instruction booklet is terrible. It's 8 pages of inconsistent, vague and saturated colour images that in some instances cause confusion. - There is inconsistency with the parts illustrated and in some cases the measurements of small parts which is very frustrating In my endeavour to experiment and develop my skills a bit, I tried to weather the deck but I fumbled and ended up blotching the deck with black ink. I had to resort to sanding it to remove most of the stains but with limited success. In addition I decided to replace the metal launch boat provided with my own scratch build. On to the anchors next. Some pictures attached.

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