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Found 15 results

  1. After finishing my S.M.S Emden I decided to build for my next project the S.M.S Scharhorst scale 1/100 my decision is based on the interesting history of this ship and the in my eyes beautiful lines of her. The hull is purchased from M.Z Modellbau, (so that one is not scratch) the rest of the model i will make from scratch and some purchased parts, so it will be a combination of both. Will build her in the same way as how I build the Emden (administrators feel free to move this topic where you see need too) so I already started with the model will post some pictures below from the beginning of the project and as where i am at the moment. Sorry for the disorder of my picture,'s
  2. Prinz Eugen, WWII German Heavy Cruiser I am afraid that I haven't been on MSW since I finished my MS Bark Endeavour over a year ago. My wife and I moved from Chagrin Falls, Ohio, USA to Asheville, North Carolina, about 540 miles (870 km) due south. We found a beautiful old stone house in the mountains that has demanded some attention and kept me from building much. Now that we are all social distancing I have had much more free time, and have made a grand start on the Aeronaut kit of the Prinz Eugen (pronounced "Prints You-gen," pardon my German.) I wanted to build a battleship model but there aren't many out there. There are lots of very detailed plastic models, and a few very large, 1:100 scale RC models. German company Aeronaut has several 1:200 scale models of German WWII battleships. They are pricey and there is almost no information about them online. I posted a query on MSW a few years ago and didn't get much information, but I decided to take a chance anyway. I really wanted to build their Bismarck kit because that's the ship that everyone knows. But I had a built-in bookshelf that was 4 ft. (1220 mm) wide and the Bismarck is 1255 mm long, so I bought the Prinz Eugen at 1170 mm. And then we decided to move and leave the bookshelf behind. I finally started the model back in March and am now well underway. This is not your typical MSW model so I wasn't sure if I would keep a build log, but I took some photos on the way and will try to catch up. And I promise to catch up on many of the other logs that I was enjoying in the past.
  3. Ahoy! I have just started building of the model NEW MEXICO (BB-40) in scale 1:200. Scratch model. The project is executed by software: Rhinoceros and Corel. The model contains laser cut elements that I designed myself. The Hull frames were made of 1.0 mm thick cardboard.
  4. Hello all. It's my first post here so a little about myself. Like many here, I suspect, I returned to the model hobby in my late twenties after a hiatus of 15 yrs or so. Since then I have made a number of wooden vessels, from kits, and I also very much enjoy bringing plastic kits mechanically to life - which is the main theme of my Youtube channel 'Gonzo mechanic'. This current project was spurred by reading about the naval campaigns of World War Two. I was fascinated to find out that the Duke of York (Capt. Guy Russell) took on and destroyed the Scharnhorst at night, in an Arctic storm, with gunnery controlled entirely by radar. Before reading about this, I had not realised that such a thing was possible in this period of the war. Indeed, it turns out Russell specially trained his gunnery teams to fight at night having discovered weaknesses in night-time drill during his time on the Nelson. Unluckily for the crew of the Scharnhorst, the Royal Navy presented the right man with right ship in the right place at the right time. I had planned to convert the Tamiya Prince of Wales to show the Duke of York in her post '44 re-fit form as the amount of anti-aircraft weaponry was truly awe inspiring: 12 pom-pom mounts (!) 2 quadruple bofors mounts and eight or so twin powered oerlikon turrets plus numerous single emplacements for the same weapon. It almost seems a pity this was never tested. However, over time, I decided to do the more familiar 1943 look as this is a rare example of a paint scheme mainly intended for fighting fight in the dark of the Arctic winter when the Russia convoys tended to run. Having bought an addtional KGV kit to borrow the waist boat platform I decided to build this later and she will form a later posting. Sources So what did she actualy look like? I bought the KGV series book by Witold Koszela and a book of drawings of the DoY by the same author. I also found this site https://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono-01BB-Duke of York.htm which turned out to be vital. Finally, there are the pictures from the IWM website of which the series taken at Rosyth 'from the 100 ton crane' are easily the most important. However, beware pictures from the IWM site. Several turned out to be mirror images which resulted in quite a lot of wasted time. Some aspects of the ship are 'handed' - like the roof of the cabin abaft the main director and the mysterious little tub thing on the stbd. side of the forward superstructure and these need to be checked. Also the date appears to be wrong because on the 1 November 1943 the DoY was in Scapa not Rosyth. The pictures more likely date from around January to March that year. The Koszela material is helpful in many ways but many details are wrong or missing. We'll come to those later. Finally the Pontos set while also hugely helpful is also missing a number of items and is also wrong in detail in some places. In other words this project has required careful synthesis from disparate and sometimes conflicting sources. Some aspects remain unresolved and it will be most interesting to see if others here can shed light on them. It is, then, a source of some surprise that is can be so hard to piece together a reasonably faithful image of one of the largest warships the UK has ever put to sea - even within living memory. First up: the hull This, like all my plastic projects, is going to be rc so it can be filmed. There are various conversion kits for other vessels available but I decided to use my 3D printer to make a motor and servo mount. Anything to do with rc has to be maintainable because the first law of sod is that anything inaccessible will break first. In addition, and without disrespect to the many very fine modellers who use them this way, I could not face having the wooden deck show up with a 'real-world' 10" step - so joined the plastic deck together and cut a rebate around the edge so that it, with the wooden deck added, would fit flush with the hull sides. Here you can see the 3d printed motor mount and dog bones. I inserted small brass washers where the dog-bones met the mount. Stern glands Rudder pintle On the right you can see, just about the rebate cut into the under edge of the deck. This was a tiresome process involving a mini-router. N.B. the hull on the left is for the KGV hence stern windows but is otherwise identical to my DoY Next up: alterations to the forward superstructure.
  5. I thought I’d post a WIP thread of my 1/1500 scratch build project of HMS Ramillies. Typically I build the base and the ship separately but this time do the some issues I had with securing USS South Carolina to her base, I’ve completed Ramillies up to the main deck and joined the sea base and the ship together. This should be okay as the superstructure will mostly be built as a sub-assembly. The model is a little less than 5” long and made from boxwood. The camouflage scheme was used by Ramillies in the winter of 1917 into the spring of 1918. The sea base is carved wood as well and painted.
  6. The Last British Battleship: HMS Vanguard, 1946-1960 - Pen & Sword Books Ltd Company: Pen & Sword Books Ltd Author: R. A. Burt Kit No: ISBN-10: 1526752263, ISBN-13: 978-1526752260 Pages: 128 Retail Price: £ 28.- Available here: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-Last-British-Battleship-Hardback/p/16234 The ninth HMS Vanguard, bearing one of the most illustrious names in the Royal Navy with honours from the Armada to Jutland, was the last and largest of Britain s battleships and was commissioned in 1946. Her design evolved from of the King George V class and incorporated much of the fully developed design for the two battleships, Lion and Temeraire, that were laid down in 1939 but never completed. At 813ft length overall and 42,300 tons, she was the last battleship to be built for the Royal Navy and the only ship of her class. She was built during the Second World War and incorporated existing twin 15in mountings, and was part of the Royal Navy s response to the combined and increasing number of German and Japanese battleships in the early 1940s. She was immediately recognisable by her transom stern and high flared bow and had fine sea keeping ability. Her appearance after the end of hostilities, however, and her huge crew requirements proved a conundrum for the Royal Navy, her most significant role being that of Royal Yacht during the royal family s tour of South Africa in 1947. She was broken up at Faslane in 1960. In this new book by R A Burt her design, construction and career are all covered. Armour, machinery, power plants and weaponry are examined in detail and the author has produced some 35 superb plans, profiles and other line drawings for which he is renowned. The text is further enhanced by the addition of some 80 colour and black and white photographs from his collection. His earlier three volumes are regarded as definitive works on the subject of British battleships before 1945; with this new book he finally completes the story of the Dreadnought era, bringing to life the last of a magnificent type of vessel of which the world will not see again. More information about the Vanguard here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Vanguard_(23) Pages: 128 Photos: 150 Folded Plan: 1 Additional 35 diagrams by the author himself, ranging from cross-section views, plans of each superstructure deck, sketches of appearance changes, and diagrams of weapons and fire control systems. Conclusion Pretty solid reference book. The author is known of profund knowledge about british battleships. Lot's of information on the ship's design, weapons, armor, refits, and service career, along with the Royal Cruise of 1949. Every model builder who is interested in detailed information about the Vanguard ships will enjoy this book. My sincere thanks go to Pen and Sword for sending this book for review here on Model Ship World. To buy, ask your favorite dealer.
  7. Here are some photos of my progress on my scratch-built, 1/1500 scale HMS Dreadnought, 125’ to 1” at just over 4” long overall. The hull was made from boxwood, the deck planked with bass. The balance of the detail is mostly brass, with some styrene, aluminum, and tungsten wire. The funnel was made from aluminum sheet, and is hollow all the way through. Probably overkill, as I included not only the external piping but internal as well. The handrails are brass, awning stanchions are tungsten wire. I’m using the plans drawn by John Roberts. I’ll post more as I continue the superstructure. Total parts count at the time of this post is 606.
  8. Hi! After a break I'm back to ship modeling, and this time I'll share the build here aswell! So my next project is the Uss Missouri as she appeared on her last tour in the Operation desert storm. My first form of business is with the hull! Firstly all the details were removed from the hull. After this thorough sanding to get rid of the all the parting lines and minor damages. Then the hull plates were masked and sprayed with Mr surfacer 500. This is by no means 100% correct so bare that in mind! Some other details were done with some masking tape on the top belts. After this Mr surfacer 1200 on top to check how it would look like. And closer look of the effect. Still waiting for the pontos set to arrive, then I'll continue to add the rest of the remaining drain pipes etc. details before continuing to the decks.
  9. Finally started on this big plastic tub. Besides the invisible PE from Tamiya - bring x-ray goggles - I've got both the Pontos detail up set advanced , and the FlyHawk. The latter is quite impressive. No pictures from the Pontos PE. I forgot to take pictures, and on top of that I just dropped my coolpix on the ground, lens first. It seems I might just as well buy a a new one, as repairs will cost me about the same The Flyhawk had the Nagato booklet, but they sent me a replacement. It seems it is easier to find what parts go where with the proper booklet Sister ship is built by Greg IJN Yamato 1:350 This will be a slow (agonising) build. I've decided to start with all the small parts like guns and turrets to get some dexterity with the PE. This is worse than the stripdown Fokker DR1 I build from Eduard
  10. Scratch built HMS Warspite.The hull is calved from a block of Canadian pine,the rest of the model is pine too.Just under 3000 pieces of wood to get it looking like this.Copied from plans,1/300 scale.
  11. Hello captains and sailors! Sorry I didn't get to post my build log because for me, the site servers were down. For me anyways, I don't know about you people. So, this is my cardboard build and I need some of your knowledge on how to to build this ship better since i'm only using cardboard, hot glue, and Elmers. BUT... it's going to be highly detailed. It's gonna take me a long time to build this. So the main model will be the USS Alabama (BB-60). Right here is my guide, a trumpeter 1/700 scale model that my brother wrecked a year ago. It's gonna be a waterline model and trust me I have worked with cardboard models years ago but first time building a cardboard ship. I'm going to aim the look of the ship to be fully, pure, made of cardboard. There's an inspiration from youtube who built a cardboard Yamato. Here are the pics. I'll keep you guys updated everyday, every other day, or weekly. Thanks for making me share this.
  12. Hello All, As I'm in the downward section of the designing and printing the USS Maine, I couldn't help but start on the French Battleship Charles Martel. I think it's a beautiful boat and comes from an interesting time. I'm fascinated by the tumble home designs and the Charles Martel has that in spades! You can read more about the Charles Martel on Wikipedia here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_battleship_Charles_Martel Will write more later but for now, here's a shot of the hull in work. there's not a lot of definition in the pronounced armor belt ...yet, but there will be!
  13. Hi all. After the construction of the model of Armed Cruiser Averof and a time of laziness, I decided to start a new model. This time it’s the Battle Ship “Kilkis”, another warship of the Greek Navy. Kilkis (Greek: Κιλκίς) was a 13,000 ton Mississippi-class battleship originally built by the US Navy in 1904–1908. As “Mississippi bb-23” she was purchased by the Greek Navy in 1914, along with her sister “Idaho bb-24” and they both renamed as “Kilkis”, and “Lemnos”. Kilkis was named for the Battle of Kilkis-Lahanas, (an aria nearby the town of “Kilkis” at northern Greece) a crucial engagement of the Second Balkan War. She was armed with a main battery of four 12 in (305 mm) guns, Kilkis and it was the most powerful vessel in the Greek fleet. (along with her sister “Lemnos”) The ship saw limited action during World War I. as it was decided to be operated solely as a harbor defense ship. In the immediately ensuing Greco-Turkish War of 1919–1922, “Kilkis” supported the Greek landing in Asia Minor and participated in the final Greek sea-borne withdrawal in 1922. She remained in service into the early 1930s, when she was used for a training ship. During the German invasion of Greece in 1941, she and her sister were sunk in Salamis by German Ju 87 Stuka dive-bombers. The two ships were ultimately raised in the 1950s and broken up for scrap. More of its history http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_battleship_Kilkis Below I post some photos of her Greek carrier. Thanks ......................... ......................... ......................... ......................... ....................................
  14. scale 1/100 canopus class first class battleship original plans were drawn by me as a vector to vector cut by the laser was by myself again. alignment problem were on the counter in the first step was to check whether any problems
  15. for anyone intrested http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-22461376

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