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Found 9 results

  1. Hello all. It's my first post here so a little about myself. Like many here, I suspect, I returned to the model hobby in my late twenties after a hiatus of 15 yrs or so. Since then I have made a number of wooden vessels, from kits, and I also very much enjoy bringing plastic kits mechanically to life - which is the main theme of my Youtube channel 'Gonzo mechanic'. This current project was spurred by reading about the naval campaigns of World War Two. I was fascinated to find out that the Duke of York (Capt. Guy Russell) took on and destroyed the Scharnhorst at night, in an Arctic storm, with gunnery controlled entirely by radar. Before reading about this, I had not realised that such a thing was possible in this period of the war. Indeed, it turns out Russell specially trained his gunnery teams to fight at night having discovered weaknesses in night-time drill during his time on the Nelson. Unluckily for the crew of the Scharnhorst, the Royal Navy presented the right man with right ship in the right place at the right time. I had planned to convert the Tamiya Prince of Wales to show the Duke of York in her post '44 re-fit form as the amount of anti-aircraft weaponry was truly awe inspiring: 12 pom-pom mounts (!) 2 quadruple bofors mounts and eight or so twin powered oerlikon turrets plus numerous single emplacements for the same weapon. It almost seems a pity this was never tested. However, over time, I decided to do the more familiar 1943 look as this is a rare example of a paint scheme mainly intended for fighting fight in the dark of the Arctic winter when the Russia convoys tended to run. Having bought an addtional KGV kit to borrow the waist boat platform I decided to build this later and she will form a later posting. Sources So what did she actualy look like? I bought the KGV series book by Witold Koszela and a book of drawings of the DoY by the same author. I also found this site https://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono-01BB-Duke of York.htm which turned out to be vital. Finally, there are the pictures from the IWM website of which the series taken at Rosyth 'from the 100 ton crane' are easily the most important. However, beware pictures from the IWM site. Several turned out to be mirror images which resulted in quite a lot of wasted time. Some aspects of the ship are 'handed' - like the roof of the cabin abaft the main director and the mysterious little tub thing on the stbd. side of the forward superstructure and these need to be checked. Also the date appears to be wrong because on the 1 November 1943 the DoY was in Scapa not Rosyth. The pictures more likely date from around January to March that year. The Koszela material is helpful in many ways but many details are wrong or missing. We'll come to those later. Finally the Pontos set while also hugely helpful is also missing a number of items and is also wrong in detail in some places. In other words this project has required careful synthesis from disparate and sometimes conflicting sources. Some aspects remain unresolved and it will be most interesting to see if others here can shed light on them. It is, then, a source of some surprise that is can be so hard to piece together a reasonably faithful image of one of the largest warships the UK has ever put to sea - even within living memory. First up: the hull This, like all my plastic projects, is going to be rc so it can be filmed. There are various conversion kits for other vessels available but I decided to use my 3D printer to make a motor and servo mount. Anything to do with rc has to be maintainable because the first law of sod is that anything inaccessible will break first. In addition, and without disrespect to the many very fine modellers who use them this way, I could not face having the wooden deck show up with a 'real-world' 10" step - so joined the plastic deck together and cut a rebate around the edge so that it, with the wooden deck added, would fit flush with the hull sides. Here you can see the 3d printed motor mount and dog bones. I inserted small brass washers where the dog-bones met the mount. Stern glands Rudder pintle On the right you can see, just about the rebate cut into the under edge of the deck. This was a tiresome process involving a mini-router. N.B. the hull on the left is for the KGV hence stern windows but is otherwise identical to my DoY Next up: alterations to the forward superstructure.
  2. The Last British Battleship: HMS Vanguard, 1946-1960 - Pen & Sword Books Ltd Company: Pen & Sword Books Ltd Author: R. A. Burt Kit No: ISBN-10: 1526752263, ISBN-13: 978-1526752260 Pages: 128 Retail Price: £ 28.- Available here: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-Last-British-Battleship-Hardback/p/16234 The ninth HMS Vanguard, bearing one of the most illustrious names in the Royal Navy with honours from the Armada to Jutland, was the last and largest of Britain s battleships and was commissioned in 1946. Her design evolved from of the King George V class and incorporated much of the fully developed design for the two battleships, Lion and Temeraire, that were laid down in 1939 but never completed. At 813ft length overall and 42,300 tons, she was the last battleship to be built for the Royal Navy and the only ship of her class. She was built during the Second World War and incorporated existing twin 15in mountings, and was part of the Royal Navy s response to the combined and increasing number of German and Japanese battleships in the early 1940s. She was immediately recognisable by her transom stern and high flared bow and had fine sea keeping ability. Her appearance after the end of hostilities, however, and her huge crew requirements proved a conundrum for the Royal Navy, her most significant role being that of Royal Yacht during the royal family s tour of South Africa in 1947. She was broken up at Faslane in 1960. In this new book by R A Burt her design, construction and career are all covered. Armour, machinery, power plants and weaponry are examined in detail and the author has produced some 35 superb plans, profiles and other line drawings for which he is renowned. The text is further enhanced by the addition of some 80 colour and black and white photographs from his collection. His earlier three volumes are regarded as definitive works on the subject of British battleships before 1945; with this new book he finally completes the story of the Dreadnought era, bringing to life the last of a magnificent type of vessel of which the world will not see again. More information about the Vanguard here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Vanguard_(23) Pages: 128 Photos: 150 Folded Plan: 1 Additional 35 diagrams by the author himself, ranging from cross-section views, plans of each superstructure deck, sketches of appearance changes, and diagrams of weapons and fire control systems. Conclusion Pretty solid reference book. The author is known of profund knowledge about british battleships. Lot's of information on the ship's design, weapons, armor, refits, and service career, along with the Royal Cruise of 1949. Every model builder who is interested in detailed information about the Vanguard ships will enjoy this book. My sincere thanks go to Pen and Sword for sending this book for review here on Model Ship World. To buy, ask your favorite dealer.
  3. Hi! After a break I'm back to ship modeling, and this time I'll share the build here aswell! So my next project is the Uss Missouri as she appeared on her last tour in the Operation desert storm. My first form of business is with the hull! Firstly all the details were removed from the hull. After this thorough sanding to get rid of the all the parting lines and minor damages. Then the hull plates were masked and sprayed with Mr surfacer 500. This is by no means 100% correct so bare that in mind! Some other details were done with some masking tape on the top belts. After this Mr surfacer 1200 on top to check how it would look like. And closer look of the effect. Still waiting for the pontos set to arrive, then I'll continue to add the rest of the remaining drain pipes etc. details before continuing to the decks.
  4. Finally started on this big plastic tub. Besides the invisible PE from Tamiya - bring x-ray goggles - I've got both the Pontos detail up set advanced , and the FlyHawk. The latter is quite impressive. No pictures from the Pontos PE. I forgot to take pictures, and on top of that I just dropped my coolpix on the ground, lens first. It seems I might just as well buy a a new one, as repairs will cost me about the same The Flyhawk had the Nagato booklet, but they sent me a replacement. It seems it is easier to find what parts go where with the proper booklet Sister ship is built by Greg IJN Yamato 1:350 This will be a slow (agonising) build. I've decided to start with all the small parts like guns and turrets to get some dexterity with the PE. This is worse than the stripdown Fokker DR1 I build from Eduard
  5. Hello everyone I'd like to start a new log for the Yamato. This kit is the one DeAgostini brought out a couple of years ago here in Belgium. I was able to buy this kit from anoter shipmodeller who had lost intrest in building her. He let her go for only 50 € so this was really a bargain This is what i got : I must admit i'm a little terrified of the adventure ahead of me, after watching the the superb logs and builds of Greg's Yamato and Carl's Musashi. The latter being the Yamato's sister ship. I hope i can do her credit by building a nice model of the greatest warship of her time.
  6. I’ve been making models since the late sixties but stopped making them when I moved home back in 2008. Due to acute kidney failure back in March leaving me needing a hobby that wasn’t to physically demanding bought me back to scale model making. My first foray back led me to buying Tamiya’s - still rather good - 1:350 scale Prince Of Wales kit which had an all too brief but illustrious career in 1941. However Tamiya being a Japanese company depicted her at the time Singapore fell in December 1941. After some research I’d decided to depict her as she was in May 1941 as she was while berthed at Scapa Flow - a bit of local interest as I live within range of her main artillery. I also needed to backdate her Triple A and colour scheme to her pre June 1941 refit. Another search led me to Korean company Pontos models multimedia Bismarck action detail up set. First image is the Tamiya kit, most of it will be staying on the sprue as the original - although good for how the technology was in 1986 leaves us wanting in the second decade of the 21st century. Second image is the Pontos models 1941 detail up set. Inside are two large bags - one containing four smaller bags of resin parts and the other containing four bags of turned brass with everything from the ships bell up to main armament barrels. Underneath are six sheets of photo etch brass. There are a couple of omissions from the set - porthole covers and carley rafts. L’Arsnell solves the raft issue still looking for a solution to the porthole issue. First update 04/07/2018 I’ve been a little busy over the last week but Sunday and today I had free time, the deck has finally been cleared and the Pontos wooden deck finally attached - it’s a nice snug fit and really looks impressive. One word of caution though, don’t remove The rectangular bumps from the foredeck and the two just aft of “Y” turret - they form the bases of the PE hatches that Pontos provide also the two square “boxes” attached to either side of “B” turret as the wooden deck goes around them - I see some scratch building in my not to distant future. THE HULL Looking at the kits hull shows only one major(ish) clanger - the bilge keel is too long (it extends too far aft and too far forward - a little bit of surgery will put that right. For reference, I’m using Roger Chesneau’s book on building the KGV class battleships and the drawings there show the bilges start 21 cm from the bow and finish 21 cm from the stern (1:350 scale) One other issue is the lack of riveted panel joints on the hull - Tamiya have managed to put them on the turrets but not the hull. A search on the internet reveals an image of POW moored in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland - stern in but riveted panel joints clearly visible - a second image (this one of the Hood) shows the entire hull panel joints clearly visible, but only down to the boot topping - Royal Navy used the same pattern in all their capital ships.
  7. Back in the early '80s, as part of Ronald Reagan's 600 ship fleet plan, four Iowa class battleships were refitted & recommissioned. I worked on two of them at Long Beach Naval Shipyard. They were the USS New Jersey (BB-62, NJBB, Jersey new in '82, at sea in '83), and the USS Missouri (BB-63, NBMO< Firepower for freedom). I installed their satellite communications suite. I even attended the commissioning ceremony for the Missouri in San Francisco. The ships were very expensive to operate, so they were decommissioned a few years later. This classified ad is real, although the ad is obviously a joke (I still have the original). It was published in the local San Pedro newspaper, the News Pilot. I thought you might get a kick out of it.
  8. Can someone please offer me help or advice. I have a WW1 battleship that you sit in an operate by remote control. Im 6ft 4inch and even I fit in it. I don't have the motor or battery required, but the vessel is impressive none the less. Is anyone interested in helping me decide what to do with it? Regards, Aidan
  9. for anyone intrested http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-22461376

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