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Found 3 results

  1. Hello all. I am about to embark on the build of the pride of Baltimore II. This will be my first attempt at ship modeling and plan on taking it step by step. I will be using the Bob Hunt practicum and refer to it throughout the build. I chose this ship since my daughter lives in Baltimore and I actually saw it in person and fell in love with it. Wish me luck. I’m going to need it. Sincerely Tony
  2. Hello, My name is Samuel and I am a 20 year old college student from Texas. I was gifted a wooden kit of the HMS Bounty 1:110 (Constructo) a few years back and never got around to building it because I was scared of messing it all up. Now as I am a little older I started it as an "end of summer project" and I think I am about 3 weeks in and the ship looks good so far. There is still a lot of work to do, and I know I will not be able to complete it before I head back to school in the fall. From reading a few posts here as well as various sources online I have come to a few conclusions. 1. The HMS Bounty is quite a famous ship because of the mutiny that occurred on board. 2. Constructo kits are not known for the best materials, instructions, or quality in general. (I'm making it work, so far so good) 3. This hobby is a very relaxing one for myself. (I love the water and I am a certified deep water diver) Attached you will see a photo or two of the ship in its current state on my makeshift drydock, as well as a photo of the box. Here is the link to my build log I just started.
  3. Hello all, So this is my first model boat build. I have some experience with traditional woodworking, but this is the first model I am attempting. I wanted to create this log to help other people who are thinking about getting started get an idea of what a first build entails, and what I will be going through. I will be trying things out, figuring out techniques, making mistakes and having to fix them, which I will (embarrassingly) try to post it all here. If any of you experienced builders have some tips on any of the things I have done or will have to do, your advice will be most welcomed. I got the Krick Alert from shipwrightshop.com, it has some vague 2 page instructions in English, but the detailed instructions are in German, so this should also help anyone building this model to identify parts, and sections of the manual. Also, I'm not the most technical or knowledgeable about the different parts of a boat, so please forgive me if I don't use the right terminology. Anyway, I'm pretty excited about this project and very quickly realised it is quite the challenge. Here it goes: This is the kit. I also ordered some files and a small saw with it and it all arrived very promptly. I would certainly recommend the guys at shipwrightshop.com, at least for people in the UK. The first thing I got started with was setting the bulkheads into the keel. Some of them were a bit to tight so I had to file down (very slightly) some of them for them to fit in tightly without having to hammer them in. After dry fitting, I applied some glue and set them in place. To ensure they would sit correctly, I dry fitted the precut deck while they dried. One bit of advice would be to number the bulkheads (A, B, C, etc) before attaching them, which will make it simpler later for the planking. I have seen some people placing supports between the bulkheads but these were so tight, and being held at the top by the deck, I didn't feel there was the need for this. Once the bulkheads where in place, I sanded the top of them to be nice and flush with the top of the keel. I then took some tracing paper and using plan Bogen 2, I traced some lines and some of the things that go on the deck to make positioning them later a bit easier. Then, I and glued the deck in place. To do this I used 1.5cm binder clips which worked great. I could press down the sides of the deck which lay slightly lower than the centre and hold it down by clipping these to the top bit of the bulkheads. Pick bellow. I originally thought to buy smaller binder clips, luckily they didn't have any smaller ones, because these are a great fit and anything smaller would not fit. I then planned the bits of the deck that were sticking out of past the bulkheads. The small D-Planed worked excellent for trimming the most of it and then I did some sanding to get it to the right spot and the deck to sit flush with the bulkheads. To bevel the bulkheads, I used one dummy plank. I bent it around the bulkheads to identify where and how much of a bevel I had to put into each one of the bulkheads. I thought of and tried different ways to do this more precisely but, being such small measurements and tight in between bulkheads, I decided to just do it by eye bit by bit until I would see the plank lay flush against the whole bulkhead. For the bigger angles I used as small D-plane and then a long piece of wood (about 20cm) with some 120grit sand paper around it which would allow me to sand a couple of bulkheads at a time keeping a rough angle of how the plank would sit. I then moved to a small piece of wood (~5cm) with the same sandpaper to do the more detailed and precise work on each bulkhead. With the deck dry and the bevels in the bulkheads, I placed the bow and stern blocks that receive the planks, and then again, using a plank as a guide, I drew the curve on them and the with a stanley knife and sandpaper I shaped these to match the curves between the bulkheads. These are the front ones, parts 15, 16, 17: and these are the rear ones, parts 18: For parts 19 in the rear, finding the piece of wood to use was quite tricky but it is a 1.5x5.160mm piece of very soft wood. The only piece of that type of porous soft wood in the whole kit. I cut parts 19 slightly longer (4 of them because you need to stack 2 on top of each other, on each side), then I wetted the two for the first layer for about 10min, dried them with a cloth and bent them to roughly the right shape. I applied glue and using the binder clips I bent and held in place the first layer. Once dry, I repeated with the second layer. Once the parts were dry, I trimmed them to size and did the same as with the stern blocks (part 18). I used a dummy plank to get the right shape and this time with a flat hand file, I filed the bevel to match the right angle. See Abb. 5 Following the rough English instructions, I started looking into the planking starting at deck level, and oh my... was that a learning curve. I had about a million questions of what to do, how to measure, how to hold the planks, how to determine the bevels of the planks, etc. Some of these questions I still haven't answered, but I will let you know as I progress. Not sure if this is the right way, but here is what I am doing: First using a small bendy wire, I measured the length of each bulkhead from the level of the deck to the very end of the bulkhead. I created a chart, with the bulkheads and their distances, and then divided the longest distance by a full width of the planks. Starting from the front I labeled the bulkheads A, B, C... bulkhead H has the longest distance of 100mm which divided by 5mm, which is the width of the planks, gave me 20 planks. I then divided all of the other distances by 20, which gave me the width of the plank at that bulkhead. I took a plank, marked the position horizontally of each bulkhead and then marked the width at each bulkhead and joined the dots. Here is a pic of the guide plank I used to mark the distance of the bulkheads: The bow and stern block attachments don't have a clear length as they progress downwards, so I just continued the line from the other bulkheads all the way to the bow and stern. I put the marked plank together with another one (to match on the other side) and using the small D-Plane, I planed the planks down to the line. I then modified the binder clips following something I saw on Youtube. (Sorry, I can't remember who's video this was but all the credit goes to you "Hero" as this would have been a nightmare without this tip.) Using the modified clips and clipping the first plank against the deck, I followed the deck line glueing the plank, leaving it 1mm longer in the bow and an the rest hanging out in the stern (as you can see a few pics back). I then sawed the front to match the angle with the keel and it fitted nicely. Here, I made my first big mistake: In the bow, I tried to keep the bevel of the plank flush with the deck, which looked quite nice from above. After it had dried, I realised that this had basically forced the plank away from the bulkheads and when placing the next plank there was a huge offset. Here is a pic of the gap: So, I had to take a blade and from underneath cut along the join of the deck and the plank for the first few bulkheads to release the plank and re-glue it allowing the bevel to shift with regards to the angle of the deck, but keeping the plank nice and flush against the bulkheads. Here is a pic of the plank removed: Here is a pic of the plank sitting nicely against the bevel of the bulkheads after re-glueing: In the stern, there was so much twist, that I had let the plank curve naturally as I laid it flush against the bulkheads so I did not have to correct this. I could see the planking being one of the biggest jobs of the boat and something that requires quite a lot of time each sitting. Therefore, I have started with some of the other parts of the boat that I can progress when I have shorter amounts of time. I will continue with some of this other work I have done, and keep updating how I get on. Happy building.

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