Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'fishing'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Captain's Cabin
    • Questions/instructions on how to use and post to this forum/Site Problems or suggestions
    • New member Introductions
  • Member's Build Logs
    • Build Logs for SHIP MODEL KITS
    • Build Logs for SCRATCH SHIP MODEL PROJECTS
  • Model Ship World Group Projects
    • Medway Longboat (1742) plank on frame group project
    • H.M.S. Triton, 28 gun frigate
    • Intro to carving - typical decorative relief carving for ship models
    • General Info about group projects on Model Ship World and past groups archived
  • Shop Notes, Ship Modeling Tips, Techniques and Research
    • Nautical/Naval History
    • Ships plans and Project Research. General research on specific vessels and ship types..
    • Building, Framing, Planking and plating a ships hull and deck
    • Discussion for a Ship's Deck Furniture, Guns, boats and other Fittings
    • Masting, rigging and sails
    • Model Tips and Tricks and Making Jigs
    • Modeling tools and Workshop Equipment
    • Metal Work, Soldering and Metal Fittings
    • Wood discussion
    • Painting, finishing and weathering products and techniques
    • CAD and 3D Modelling/Drafting Plans with Software
  • Ship Modeling News And Reviews.....Traders and Dealers...Ship Model Clubs
    • General Ship Model Kit Discussions
    • Reviews
    • Book, Monograph and Magazine reviews and Downloads. Questions and Discussions for Books and Pubs
    • Traders, Dealers, Buying or Selling anything? - Discuss New Products and Ship Model Goodies here as well!!
    • NAUTICAL RESEARCH GUILD - News & Information
    • Important Ship Model Club News, Links to ship modelling resources and museums
  • The Crew's Lounge
    • Nautical General Discussion
    • Shore Leave

Calendars

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


NRG Membership Number

Found 12 results

  1. A “dragger” is a fishing vessel that tows a trawl net. A trawl can be dragged along the bottom of the seafloor, just above the bottom, or in midwater depending on the target species. In the early 1920’s the Connecticut fishing industry began producing what is known today as the Western-rig dragger. These boats were not the first pilothouse forward fishing boats built in New England, but due to their small size, the design was affordable and perfectly suited to independent fisherman working the local inshore waters. These small fishing draggers were typically less than 60 feet in length. Built of steam bent oak frames and planked with yellow pine or white oak, they were both light and strong. The popularity of this Western-rig design quickly spread and by the 1930’s could be found in many ports of southern New England. The use of these boats for ground fishing was so prevalent in the port of Stonington, Connecticut, that the design commonly became known as “Stonington Draggers.” Western-Rig - Winthrop Warner Collection, Mystic Seaport Museum Western-Rig vs. Eastern-Rig The difference between a Western-rig and Eastern-rig boat is one of deck arrangement and not the gear used in catching fish. Western-rig boats have the pilothouse positioned in the bow with the working deck aft. On Eastern-rig boats the working deck is positioned mid-ship with the pilothouse in the stern. Eastern-Rig - Albert E. Condon Collection, Mystic Seaport Museum The Eastern-rig deck arrangement evolved from the New England fishing schooners and “auxiliary schooners” which required the helm to be over or near the rudder. But once fishing vessels became fully powered with a tiller system and rudder quadrant installed, the pilothouse could be positioned anywhere. Enter the Western-rig. Western-Rig - Winthrop Warner Collection, Mystic Seaport Museum The Western-rig has some advantages. With the pilothouse forward in the bow, there is easier access to the fo’c’sle and the engine room. It also provides better visibility for the captain, and the crew is somewhat safer in bad weather working behind the pilothouse rather than in front of it. One disadvantage to having the pilothouse in the bow is that the windows are more vulnerable to being smashed out in bad weather. In the early days, the Western-rig boats were small and only used for inshore fishing while the larger more powerful Eastern-rig boats fished offshore. In time however, the Western-rig boats grew in size and power to become today’s offshore stern trawlers and the dominant fishing vessel type. The Otter Trawl Even though the Western-rig Stonington boats had an open aft deck and a square stern, most continued to drag off the side. And like the Eastern-rig boats, the gear most commonly used was the “Otter Trawl.” Otter trawling was invented in England and came to America around 1910 – give or take. It derived its name from the “otter board” which was the name given to a sheering device that was being used for “hook and line” lake fishing in Ireland. Like a modern day planer board, this rectangular wood board would sheer on the water surface and course away from the direction it was being pulled. In commercial fishing, the otter boards are industrial scale and can weigh hundreds of pounds. Two such boards (commonly called doors) are used to hold open the mouth of the trawl net. Like underwater kites, the otter boards are setup to push outward, away from each other, as the hydrodynamic pressure of moving water acts upon them. This was a major advancement over the “beam” trawl, which as the name implies requires a beam of some sort to keep the mouth of the net spread open. Needing a beam also severely limited the size of the trawl being towed and was cumbersome and impractical for a smaller boat. Now with the otter trawl, a single small boat, like the Stonington dragger, could tow a net limited only by its engine power. The Otter Trawl - above & below Copyright Seafish The drawings, inspiration and photos for this build come from several sources and the model built from them will be a vessel typical of the design but not of a single example. The hull will be built from one source, while some detailing and features may come from elsewhere. All features and details will depict what would have been found on actual boats – nothing will be added for the sake of visual interest. This model will be weathered to show honest wear. It will not be a wreck, but I have never seen a pristine commercial fishing vessel. Hard working fisherman worked these boats hard. I hope to capture that feel without making a caricature out of it. Thanks for taking a look. Gary
  2. Ahoy there! This is the beginning of my build log of the Model Shipways Benjamin Latham POB kit. DISCLAIMER: This is my first POB kit, so this is not the place to come to learn best practices, but maybe I can offer a little insight between my stumbling through like a blindfolded elephant in a china shop! It's been a while since I have been active on this forum, but now I have my degree, have a job, have an extra bedroom to set up my workshop, and have a little extra time to do some modelling. Many many big life events ago, I had a build log for the Model Shipways Pilot Boat Phantom, which you can find in my signature, but about 5 moves later, she is in rough shape and I would like to start with something fresh and get back to her sometime in the future. Anyway, I have had the Banjamin Latham kit since I started my Phantom all those years ago and have always been drawn to her lines. I finally mustered up the courage to crack open that kit and try to tackle my first plank on bulkhead kit. This first post will just be a quick catch up to show the little progress I made before starting this log. I am looking forward to this build and excited to be an active member of MSW again, please feel free to pull up a chair and get comfortable, because I am sure I will need your help along the way and it is sure to be a long endeavor. Here are the obligatory photos of the box and its contents: <Placeholder> I broke out my trusty Stanley no. 12-101 and Veritas chisel to carve the simulated rabbet in the marked up false keel. Here is a picture showing the false keel and a few shavings. Oh, did I mention that this was take two? I accidentally carved the wrong taper in the first keel/stem assembly and Model Shipways was kind enough to send me replacements, as always. I love the support they offer for their kits! You can see the old false keel in the bottom right of this photo. Next, I completed the construction of the keel/stem assembly which consists of two pairs of two parts all glued together, carved the tapers near the bow, and glued her to the false keel. All in all, it came out okay, but I can definitely tell that I am a little rusty. As you can see in the second photo below, the glue joint for the keel/stem assembly is a bit off, but I made sure to make it as flush as possible on both sides, so hopefully it will not be noticed once the hull is painted. I think the rabbet came out pretty well! If I can find the old photo, I will post it, but I used tracing paper to transfer the profile of each bulkhead to some manila folder material to use as a template for shaping them and making sure that they are symmetrical. In the meantime, here is a photo of all the bulkheads shaped and ready for fitting to the false keel. I drew the WL-6 line on both sides of each bulkhead as well as the appropriate letter designations. Following the lead of others, I decided to trim off the bulkhead stanchions from each bulkhead so that they can all be installed at once later in the build and this should make them all match better since they will all have the same fabrication and installation method. Well, that is it for now, just wanted to get this build log started and quickly up to date so that I can post progress as I go. I remember getting a lot of helpful tips, insight, and knowledge from everyone who stopped by my Phantom log, so I would like to say thank you in advance to everyone for the great ideas and encouragement along the way. I am very much looking forward to taking this journey with you all. Cheers, Max
  3. Here's my new project for next few months. I'm going to build this ship for my first daughter. I got so excited that I did not take any picture of the content before starting. Lol
  4. I am guessing everyone has a wish list and I wanted to share an item on mine with you guys, and hope that you can answer the question I have related to it. The Admiral is a beach girl who grew up pretty much listening to the sound of the Atlantic surf on the east coast here. Because of that she has requested that my next build be a shrimp trawler. Having lived with her at the beach in North Carolina for a number of years I have seen these beautiful boats in action (tasted the shrimp too ). My question is, where can I get a decent kit that would do these crafts justice. I am not looking for a kit that would be thrown together in "10 minutes" and be stuck on a shelf, by the same token I am not quite at the scratch build standard with my skills either. I want one that can occupy my time while I take a break perhaps from my current build. I have added an image below of a trawler I snapped a shot of one morning down at the pier. It is this type of old boat I am looking for. Any input would be very much appreciated guys.
  5. So here we go again with an older kit. Let's start with the kit contents. Here's one of the two plan sheets, the rigging package, and the instruction booklet. And here is the other plan sheet, along with the stick wood.
  6. Hello everyone, I was asked to finish this ship on behalf of a fellow shipbuilder who past a few years ago by his daughter. The Hull was completed with a few mistakes here and there. Some repairs were needed to get it as smooth as possible. The deck furnitures were also completed for the most part. They do need some love and attention. Here is a picture of the ship now. Started to work on the rails and discovered a few problems. Repaired Here is the result after the rails have been installed
  7. Here is a massive site 14,000 images of West Coast Work Boats. http://www.besthistoricfishing.net/
  8. I've been reading Chappelle's "The American Fishing Schooners 1825 - 1935" and have come across something that has me confused, about how rudders were "hinged" before about 1880. In describing a particular ship built in 1887 "Her very sharp ends ... hollowed sternpost, and strap pintles and grudgeons were departures from contemporary fishing schooners." So if the strap pintles and grudgeons where not used previously, what method did they use before this to mount the rudders? One of my upcoming projects is the Flying Fish schooner, and I would like to put the proper hardware on her.
  9. Hello my name is Kees de Mol and I am from Holland. I build model fishing boats. Here I will report the building progress on the Scottisch Fishing Trawler FR-927. The build is totally scratch build and I'm almost in the last phase of the construction. The ship is made like it has been used fore a few month's so it has al lot of wheatering. I wont post a lot of text because my English is not very good but if you have questions or comments don't be affraid... Google translate is a very good friend of mine. It will be a static model not for R/C Regards, Kees
  10. Hello friends, under the Chrismas tree I found her! Possible to built her with clinkerd panking! Later more about these traditional Pommeranian and Prussian shallow water fishing barges. Here the very first pictures from the freshly opened box:
  11. I don't know why, but I have a fascination with things that are out of the ordinary. While I think the tall ships like the Victory and Constitution are gorgeous I was drawn to the little fishing trawler style of ship. After looking at my options I settled on the Krabbenkutter from Billing Boats. I've started it at this point so it is time to share. Pull up a chair, popcorn, beer, or cider and enjoy Lets start with the obligatory kit photos.
  12. Hi all, My job has major up and down swings as far as how busy I am, and sometimes I even run out of busy work. I would sit there and read through MSW thinking about my build or my upcoming builds...but what I really wanted to be doing during the down time was modeling. I purchased a card kit of a fishing boat. I have never ever built a card model, and I've seen some of the amazingly intricate work that was on the old forum....knowing I'd probably botch my first one I just grabbed a low cost one that still seemed interesting. So here it is. Of course you will see some big mistakes - please point them out and tell me how I can avoid them next time. Here is the kit - I can't find builds of it ANYWHERE including the paper model forums... I started with the structure. Here is my first mistake...I glued the two sides together as the instructions said - but due to their translation I didn't know to avoid gluing the tabs and that they would be placed separated on the base. I cut them back apart as best as I could. After getting my stations organized I put them on.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...