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Found 10 results

  1. Late summer 1805, the sun is burning inexorably from above, the wind is completely asleep, the sea is smooth as glass. The dispatches have already been exchanged. The master of the small cutter has just returned to his tiny vessel. Behind it there is towering the enormously massiv silhouette of the huge black and ocher striped three decker. Through the open gunports the lashed up guns can be seen. Also the officers' cabins ports are wide opened by the order of the Captain's to ensure an optimal ventilation of the hot and steamy lower decks. Clatter of activity on some guns being ran out cuts through the silence. The rumble of the heavy guns rolling over the decks and the trampling of countless bare feet and the short shouted commands supported by a multitude of hand signs originate from the ordered gundrill for new gun crews and their officers. In competition between the three decks they are fighting for the fastest rate of firing. The rest of the ships crew is occupied with cleaning and mending duties. The holystone are scratching on the decks. Above all the sails hang slack in their yards. No breath of wind moves them. They are nestled heavily over stays and fighting tops. The captain took advantage of the hot calm to put up all the canvas possible for airing. One of the studdingsails is taken in, the spar tied up with its inner end against the shrouds, in order to mend something on its fittings. Sitting on a swing seat pendent from the fore top, a crew member just is finishing painting over with ocher the originally black coloured mast loops. On the poop Captain Hardy monitors the young cadets´ training in navigation, supported by Lord Nelson, who uses the opportunity to entertain the cadets with stories of his actions and the ideas of his tactical concepts. But in the back of everybodys mind there is just one question - When will there be wind again ...
  2. Welcome to my newest build log my friends. I picked the Benjamin W Latham because it's the largest model I have. It a 1:48 scale so I should have ample room for details. With my Ranger bash there was virtually nothing left of the original model. With this bash I'm going to build most of everything, but leave it the same ship. I'm also going to take this one as far as I can with the details, adding any/everything that was on this fishing schooner. I like the look of real wood so I'll be staining, not painting, this model. Launched on Oct 30, 1902, she was designed by Thomas F McManus(Boston) and built in the shipyard of Tarr & James(Essex, Massachusetts) for Captain Henry Langworth(Noank, Connecticut). She was built as a sailship and fitted with a 48-horsepower engine sometime during her 2nd or 3rd season. A 72 ton mackerel seiner, she had in tow one seine boat and accommodations for a crew of 15. As with most fishing vessels, most of her career was undocumented, finally lost off San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1943. So take a seat and buckle up, we're going on a journey. I will attempt to make this build an intriguing one. Thank to everyone for all the help and encouragement I received on my previous builds, I welcome you all back again.
  3. With the Charles W Morgan safely in her case awaiting only a brass engraved nameplate before moving upstairs, it's time to start a new project (projects?). Going to start with the gunboat Philadelphia which I've had on the shelf for some time. I need a break from 1/64 fully rigged ship so the Granado will wait for this project to be completed. [note: Granado will wait a while longer] I'm looking forward to (super)detailing a 1/24 build with minimal straight-forward rigging (at least compared to the Morgan). I've ordered replacement blocks and line from Chuck, and gathered materials including the 6 part series on this build from Ships in Scale. I'm not detailing in photos the box contents as they have been covered in a current build log and several fairly recent finished ones. Will start construction next week. I've been at loose ends in the mornings as that has been my shipyard time through the (long) end of the Morgan build. There is a nice case awaiting this rather wide model (nearly 14 inches) that I had bought years ago for a Victory model I bought but did not build. As my house started to fill with MY completed models I decided to give that ship away to a friend who had admired it. I was tired of explaining to people that I had built the New Bedford Whaleboat, Picket Boat #1, and now the Charles W Morgan but NOT that one. At the same time (now that I'm fully retired) I'm going to practice Byrnes saw, scroll saw, and mill skills to begin the Echo cross section on some ordered boxwood before I break into the wood included in the Admiralty Models package. These are things I've not done so need the practice for this entry into the shallow end of the scratch build pool.
  4. Hi All, This is my thrid kit build on MSW, and I'm taking on the HM Cutter Sherbourne from Jokita/Caldercraft. This will be my second "proper kit buid" on here as I started the Mantura/Sergal HMS President kit, and gave up on it due to the lack of decent intsructions and plans included in with the kit. My darling girlfriend (known as the Admiral) exceeded all expectations and bought me this kit for our anniversary in March. As you can all imagine, I was very very happy with this, and ended up maxing out the credit card on designer handbag(s) for her! So why start now?! In the last month or so, I have finished my build of HM Mortar Vessel Convulsion from Caldercraft, and was planning on joining a few other members on here to start a goup build of Sherbourne, but the Tennancy on my flat is up at the begining of August, so I was feeling a bit dubious about transporting the kit if we (the Admiral) decided we should move on to another property. Fingers crossed that won't be the case, but this is almost a preemptive strike to ensure the model is as safe as possible IF we do decide to move. Fingers crossed that we don't - I like our little flat! If you're interested in my Convulsion build, then click the link below. http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/8593-hm-mortor-vessel-convulsion-by-jonnyamy-caldercraft/page-1 So a kit bash? Because this is a special kit for me, I'd decided to make it is a little different! The main differences in the build from the kit will be: Replace Walnut planking layer with Basswood Replace Wales with Ebony Strips (if available) Treenailing of outer hull planking (to water line) Treenailing the Deck & Edge Planks Addition of Fife Rail around the Mast Rigging of sails (including all running rigging) Addition of Ships Boat Crew Figures (5 sailors max. 3 officers max.) Possible rebuild of the windless Replace White Metal cannon stock with Brass (white metal castings are terrible). So I'm about to buy the Basswood from Hobbycarft here in the UK, as they seem to be the cheapest source of Basswood strips I could find online. I will be using the book "Super - Detailing the Cutter Sherbourne: a guide to building the Caldercraft kit" by George Bandurek as my guide for the Kit Bash. I hope you all enjoy my journey in to the unkown of Kit Bashing, and tag along if you fancy it! Cheers Jonny
  5. About 25 years ago I bought this kit in a Hobby store in CA. It has been through 2 moves since and we are preparing to move again, and I will temporarily loose my shop. So I thought it was high time to finish something. Along the way I have lost a few pieces and picked up another copy of this kit off of ebay. Before the forum upgrade there were a couple build logs of this kit. Unfortunately I don't see them now. I became very discouraged when I relalized the significant errors in this kit. This is AL's version of the Baltimore Clipper. This is a period of US history in which I am very interested. Even the historical information is pure fantasy. But enough about the flaws. It is still an attractive model. There was also a build log here that really inspired me. It was a Kit bash of this kit and renamed the Lady Anne. This is what got me to restart. She will be the Lady Caroline (the admiral's name is Carol). So let us begin -
  6. Greetings!!! After resting from ship modelling for 2 months, I am finally back! (Not a long time tough... ) I've been lucky enough to win this kit from an auction at a cheaper price right after my Race Horse, and it's in great condition. She arrived my door 2 weeks after that, and I've been studying the plans and instruction since then. Thanks to Ianmajor and Mike who had discussed about this ship earlier in other topic, so I can now plan for some modification on this ship. The wide waist of the Unicorn really makes this model a good ship to add more fittings on. Anyway, here's some quick peeks to the kit. Brief Introduction According to Corel Kit Historically, the frigate Unicorn has left as no tales of outstanding war feats or important enterprises, those which often mark the career of a man of-war so that be remembered even after his disappearance. All we know is that this ship has been designed by F.H. af Chapman for H.M.S Fleet in 1700s. On the other hand we have many accurate data regarding its construction. In fact, Chapman, member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences in his admirable volume "Architectura Navalis Mercatoria" printed in Stockholm in 1768, gives an extremely detailed account of the calculation relating to the design of the ship and not only the constructional ones, but also those relating to the study hydrodynamic-resistances. All this together with a most beautiful drawing of the frigate, which have used to develop this model. The results of Chapman hydrodynamic investigation are clearly visible in the lines of the hull which are quite advanced for the epoch in which the ship has been built. So... In conclusion, even Corel doesn't really understand much about the ship! You can try search through the internet or wikipedia, and you will find there were around 6 Unicorns between 17th to 18th Century!! LOL!! Here's the link. Anyway, I do agree with Ianmajor that this HMS Unicorn is the one as mentioned in wikipedia which serviced from year 1747 to 1771. "... the Unicorn having a beakhead bow, a unicorn figurehead , two-light quarter galleries and only five pairs of quarterdeck gunports... " This line describes real close to the ship Check here if you're interested to know However, whether it's historical accurate or not, I'm gonna kit bash it Time to unbox!! The instruction plans of Corel is a bit... err... mehh... The font used is too small... might need magnifying glass (just pretend the sunglasses as magnifying glass ) Anyway, the picture instruction are good Excellent wood quality Some well cut strips.. Same goes to dowels Shiny figure head Terrible capstan... Despite the excellent quality of the wood strips and dowels, some fittings are badly shaped.. This is one example. Smaller blocks and gratings are to be trashed too I love this!!! Even the cannons are already blackened! And the stern gallery... hmm I don't blame the manufacturers for this, there's no way they can provide their customers well carved galleries.. planning to remake them. It's challenging, but learn a new skill.. y not? I'm overall satisfy with this kit. at least the wood quality is much better than Sergal ones.. oh ya, the ship cradle is included too! I've just done putting on the bulkheads, but haven't taken pictures.. Will upload them soon! Cheers!
  7. Having just completed a re-indexing of my Build Log photo archive (970 plus and growing) I am now going to begin the process of re-posting *most* of those photos onto the new/old Build Log. Some of the photos will likely be out of sequence early on but hopefully it won't be that badly mixed up. And I am going to try and 'remember' as much of what was going on at the time as possible, though strictly speaking so much went on that I don't expect to remember most of the specific details. Having said that -- Let's roll! On October 01, 2009, a co-worker rescued a dismasted model ship that was being thrown out in the garbage. He offered it to me innocently, not knowing that by doing so he was about to send me on a trip across the waters of unknown territory filled with information, frustration, obsession, distraction and hundreds upon hundreds of hours of work. During my voyage I have dredged up past experience and mixed it well with the new skills I have picked up. And eleven months or so into that voyage I finally made the dive from lurker to member of MSW. So these first rounds of photos involve the time Before MSW - when the Transition occurs I will make note of it. But to start - here's the start of it. From my current perspective I still wonder what the heck I was thinking when I brought it home, lol. The original caption for this photo was, "Now here's my plan ..."
  8. This is a reconstruction of the build log for my first wooden ship build, which I started in July 2011. Most of the construction on this model took place through the second half of 2011, before I took on a new role at work during early 2012 and moved to a new city. I can't overstate how important MSW has been to me throughout this build. The MSW forums are a great resource and an ongoing source of inspiration for me, and I doubt whether I would have been able to get as far as I have with this model without this site and the community here. Like many, I was disappointed when v1.0 of the site crashed and everything was lost. But I've been impressed by the speed with which moderators and other members have come together to rebuild the site and reconstruct the wealth of information that existed in v1.0. Given how much I owe to the MSW community of builders, I wanted to make my own small contribution to the reconstruction efforts and will document the course of my build here. Instead of re-creating every post, my aim is to post as many pictures as possible to chronicle the course of my build and highlight some of the things I learned along the way. Hopefully this will help future builders just as the many Sherbourne logs on MSW v1.0 helped and inspired me. Now that we've gotten that out of the way, let's get back to the shipyard. To start, the title of this build log is not a typo. Caldercraft sells this model as HMC Sherbourne but the name on the 1763 NMM plans is HMC Sherborne, so that's what I've decided to call it. (Edit: After writing this post, I noticed that one of the admins changed the title of this topic back to "Sherbourne" instead of "Sherborne," which is fine.) I chose the model as my first kit for a couple of reasons. First, I've always liked how cutters look. Second, the model seemed like a good starting point, with only a handful of cannons and relatively modest rigging. I wanted my build to be historically accurate, within the limits of my own skill and the available resources, so I purchased copies of all the Sherborne plans in the NMM collection. They weren't cheap, but I highly recommend them. The plans highlight the many small differences between the Caldercraft kit and what the actual Sherborne probably looked like. My aim is to bash the Caldercraft kit to more closely resemble the NMM plans. Early on, I made the decision to give my model a clinker (or lapstrake) hull. This was the type of hull construction used for most cutters during the last half of the 18th century. By the early 19th century, cutters were largely built using carvel planking. Suffice it to say there has been much debate about whether or not the Sherborne was built using clinker or carvel construction. I haven't seen any conclusive evidence one way or the other. I decided on a clinker hull because I think they look cool, and that style of planking seemed to me more typical of cutters built during this period. Best, Sumner
  9. Well, hello all together! Since almost 3 years I try to complete a soclaine offered kit of the privateer cutter "Le Renard" which was once owned (not sailed) by the famous Robert Surcouf. As I do not want to repeat all steps of the build so far, I just introduce some pictures of the actual state: The hull is double planked by swiss pear for the outer layer. Actually I prepare the carronade takles. Have fun with the picture. Concerning the colors of the cutter, i want to explain, that I left the outer hull almost wodden, because i like the colour of the peach. Inside the ship is painted in the original yellow-black livre. Robert Surcouf

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