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Found 9 results

  1. I am resuming a build of the Mantua Albatros "Goleta tipica di Baltimora" - a Baltimore clipper, fitted out as a revenue cutter. I started the kit back in the mid 1980s and finished planking the hull. Then other things came along (buying a house, getting married, etc.) that left little time for ship modeling. The partially completed hull has resided on my bookshelf for about 30 years. I really like the lines of these ships so I decided to resume the build, but I am not sure what it will end up being. I am building it to get experience with a few new techniques. This is the 1980s kit, and it is different from the latest Mantua Albatros kit description on line. The new kit has a false deck, apparently of thin plywood, and the 1980s kit does not. The newer kit seems to have mahogany hull planking, and the older kit used tiglio or lime wood. The older kit came with two drawing sheets, hull construction and sail plan, plus brief instructions. The Mantua web site says the new kit has three drawings, and at least one appears to be the same as the 1980s kit. The 1980s "instructions" are a joke - one page saying to assemble the hull frames, plank the hull, assemble the base, build the masts and finish the rigging - just about that brief! For me this isn't a problem. I have been researching and scratch building plank on bulkhead models since I was a kid. I have searched and found no record of a Baltimore clipper named "Albatros." The kit name suggests Mantua's "famous" ship is just "typical" of a Baltimore clipper. Looking at the plans for the model and plans for actual Baltimore clippers I can see quite a few differences. This raises several questions, and I would appreciate any help you can offer. 1. Scale. The 1980s kit plans and instructions give no scale. Comparing with other ships I guessed it was about 1:64 scale. Some sites say the Mantua model is 1:55 scale, and the latest Mantua web site says it is 1:40 scale. The model is about 27" long (tip of bowsprit to end of the spanker boom), and this is what Mantua says is the length of their latest Albatros model. The waterline (length between perpendiculars) is about 17 inches. This would give a full scale hull length between perpendiculars of: 1:40 - 56' 4" and about 70 tons 1:55 - 78' and about 100 tons 1:64 - 90' 8" and about 180 tons Baltimore clippers were constructed in approximately all of these sizes between 1800 and 1820. Since the model has only six cannons plus one larger gun on the centerline, I assume the 1:40 scale is close. There were several 60 foot ships built. Any thoughts? 2. Mast angles. The Mantua plans show the rake of the fore mast to be 2-3 degrees and the main mast to be 5 degrees relative to the water line. I examined plans and drawings for 17 Baltimore clippers and found the mast rakes to be: Fore mast - 11.5 degrees average, with a range of 7-16 degrees Main mast - 13.75 degree average, with a range of 8-22 degrees The rake of the masts is one of the outstanding characteristics of these ships, and none were as boring as 3-5 degrees! I plan to build it with 11.5 and 14 degree rakes. 3. Deck fittings. The Mantua kit has four hatches with gratings and one flat solid hatch on the deck. Looking through Chapelle's books I see that almost all of the revenue cutters had some form of low deck house and companionway, even the small 30 ton ships. I think I will build deck fittings similar to an actual 70-80 ton revenue cutter. 4. Stern. Most Baltimore clippers had either round tuck or square tuck transoms. A few appear to have had curved transoms. The kit plans seem to show an odd flat stepped square tuck like nothing I see in any of the Baltimore clipper plans. In any case, when I started the kit in the '80s I constructed a curved transom faired into the hull lines, more like some of the later schooners I have seen. It may not be accurate for an 1815 revenue cutter, but I am not going to deconstruct the hull and start over again! 5. Colors. The hull was painted with white lead below the waterline. Chapelle says American schooners after the Revolution were painted yellow topside with black trim. In the early 1800s they were painted yellow topside with a broad black stripe along the gun ports. Deck houses were white or light gray, and bulwarks could be red, brown, green, blue, white or varnished. The kit box cover shows a broad yellow stripe along the gun ports with brown/black trim, and yellow bulwarks with brown/black trim. I am inclined to use the broad black stripe along the gun ports (between the main deck and cap rail) with yellow trim above and white below the waterline. The bulwarks will be white or yellow, and the deck furniture white. 6. Deck planking. I am familiar with nibbing, but this didn't come into practice until the mid 1800s. Before that planking was tapered and hooked. I have thought about this, and read the few tutorials on hooked deck planking, and I just don't understand the procedure. If you start planking at the center line and work outwards, you apparently have to curve the outermost plank while laying it and then cut into the previously laid plank to create the hook. Nibbing is a lot simpler! By the 1850s planking on revenue cutters was nibbed, so I guess I could build the ship as a mid 1800s revenue cutter. But I need the practice with the hooking technique for the next build I am planning to make (Rattlesnake). I guess I will create a CAD plan of the deck and practice making the hooked deck planking. I'll post some pictures of the 1980s hull and current modifications later. Phil
  2. As inbetween project (to much repetitive stuff with Syren and Sherbourne atm ... ) and as a XMas gift for my father I started this little ship. The Maria HF 31 was a fishing Ewer from Hamburg/Finkenwerder. Thats very very close to where I live btw Build 1880 she operated until 1950. During this period she has undergone several rebuildings, including motorization. The Ship is restored and has it's place in the "Deutsches Museum" in Munich. Another reason for this build was my curiosity about the kits from Daniel Dusek. From what I read and saw on youtube they look very promising (and indeed, they are). First some pictures of the parts. PRO: ++ Very good Wood (Pear!!) ++ Very good laser cutting ++ Very good Photoetched Parts ++ Full lasered planks ++ Double Planking ++ Affordable ++ Solid construction CONTRA: -- Manual -- The images on the packaging (I will revise Pro/Contra while building if necessary) There are all parts to build the Maria as Sailing Ewer or as motorized one. I will build the sailing version. I will try to build OOB but can't promise I allready bought the book "Ewer Maria" with a lot of pictures and informations. Actual State: cheers, Dirk
  3. My fellow model shipwrights, I want to build a model of the Kalmar Nyckel (http://www.kalmarnyckel.org/), but apparently none exists. I lack the skill to build a wooden one from scratch. However, since I am going to crew her this year, I am absolutely champing at the bit to have a model of her. The Kalmar Nyckel (a pinnace) looks a lot like a galleon and is of that era, so I thought maybe a galleon could be modified to look like her. The Revell Spanish Galleon was out, since its aftercastle is too high and the stern itself has two balconies. The Golden Hind, however, looks pretty close. The plans of both are attached for comparison (My thanks to KeithW for the Kalmar Nyckel plans). The Kalmar Nyckel has a shallower draught, especially toward the stern. The wales up above the weather deck are entirely different, and the gratings are in different locations. The quarterdeck/poop (whatever you call those on a older vessel like this) is in a bit of a different location. The balcony on the stern is different, as well. It seems to me that all of this (except the draught, might have to live with that, I don't know) could be overcome with some sanding, cutting, and kitbashing. TL;DR: Can I use kitbashing, sanding, and cutting to make the Golden Hind into a presentable (though certainly not perfect) approximation of the Kalmar Nyckel? What do you folks think? Is this feasible? Do you all know of another kit that would work better?
  4. Hej, it's not that I wanna stop the build of my Sherbourne, it's just that there is so much detailstuff to do, and I can't concentrate on that very good atm. So I decided to start the build of the USS Syren and switch, depending on my mood, between these builds I could complete chapter 1 today. Knee of the head: My babys together And the mermaid Cheers, Dirk
  5. A long time of no posting and several requests has made me to start the next Harvey project build log. This build has been going on for some time. Many changes and alterations has been done to the original parts, this due to material not measuring to the material list dimensions. This picture is the latest one some ten minutes old, before uploading. From this point I will go back to the start and explain what I have done as there are several changes, this in my best way. Have patience with me, as this kit will be kit bashed. not knowing the final physical outcome. This picture also shows partial of the pre-bending of walnut strips. As I am intending a single layer planking.If I fail I can go to double layer. By putting the paper clips on each bulkhead I can there-after put soaked strips through the holes and get the right bending. Some of the pictures from this build has appeared in other topics.
  6. I final finished my first wooden boat, the Mini Mamoli British Schooner Evergreen, a 1:125 Scale Solid Hull Model after a two year build. This was my first attempt at such an endeavor in 30 years. I had started the Billings Boat’s POB Zwarte Zee , an ocean tug back then but got about only about 85% complete. I never finished it. So with a completed build under my belt, I set my sights on the 1781 American Privateer, The Rattlesnake. I considered the Evergreen my “training wheels” for this build. Although technically the Zwarte Zee was my first POB boat, all of the planking flaws were covered up with wood filler and paint. This would be my first true test in this construction method. What you see is what I built for better or worse. This build was started in October 2010 and I have only now decided in May 2013, to post my build log. I was reluctant to do so because compared to the others members who post comments regularly and have submitted their many build logs, I am but a beginner. I have knowing or unknowingly made many errors, omissions, and mistakes. It would be like hanging out my dirty laundry. But after some prodding by some of the members, I agreed to post my build if anything to show the error of my ways to anyone who wants to follow a slooow moving project. I had a choice of the Mamoli or the Model Shipway kit. After a little research I discovered Robert Hunt’s Practicum (http://www.lauckstreetshipyard.com/) and thought this is just perfect for me. Having struggled through the minimal instructions of the Norwegian translation for the Zwarte Zee and the simplistic instructions translated from the Italian for the Evergreen, and after reading the free sample Chapter 1 with its highly detailed instructions and detailed photographs, I was easily convinced to purchase Robert’s practicum. There I found that the practicum was based on the Mamoli kit, so I chose that kit to build. To be fair, Mr. Hunt did state that his practicum could also be used for the Model Shipway kit. The practicum was written to both supplement and enhance the original kit instructions or to kitbash the project. Because the “journey” to me is the purpose of building a model, rather than the destination, the final model, I chose to build the kitbash and plunked down my money: · Basic kit - ~$240 · Robert Hunt’s Practicum (http://www.lauckstreetshipyard.com/) - $150 · Harold Hahn’s plans ¼” scale - $45 · Reduce the Hahn plans 74% to match the kit’s 3/16” scale (1:64) - ~$25 · Hobbymill Wood Package (http://www.hobbymillusa.com/) - $210 This not a cheap build/modification. This does not include the tools that I accumulated and still am accumulating for this project. Hell, it’s a hobby, so it’s OK, that and the fact that I just retired and am a bachelor. A kitbash goes beyond what the basic kit instructs to make the model more interesting, challenging, and pleasing. In this case Mr. Hunt’s practicum is based on the model Harold Hahn, a master model builder, built using plans he created based directly from the original British Admiralty drawings. Although this is an American ship, it was captured by the British and it is from them we can thank for having the historical drawings and the name Rattlesnake. In this model Mr. Hahn used direct woods to create the colors of the ship. Therefore in keeping true the Hahn model, the practicum substitutes the basic kit wood with a wood package purchased separately from Hobbymill (http://www.hobbymillusa.com/); and has you purchase the Harold Hahn copyrighted plans which Robert is basing his kitbashing modifications. Since Mr. Hahn built his model in ¼” scale, the plans have to reduce to match the kit scale of 3/16” (1:64). Your ordinary office copy won’t do the trick due to the size of the sheets. You need a large copier and one that can do reductions, specifically 74%, the kind found at a large stationary store, graphics, or engineering firm.
  7. To get a bit of an order here, and to overcome the 10 image limit, I redid the posts here All the older buildpics can be seen here: https://picasaweb.google.com/112214601525161753861/BauberichtSherbourneWasserzeichen?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCOr25uLXuOOWRw&feat=directlink Edit: I could restore a bit via Google Cache, I will edit here the next days: After a three year building break due to some private issues and high workload, I decided to start a small kit out-of-box just to build a bit and have fun ... haha .. not possible, I mean the out-of-box. Because of that and the long break I simply forgot some of my own rules for building: Measuring and Preparation all the time Now as it turned out not to be a "simple" build There are some, visible flaws, I have to live with (unfortunatley I am sure u will get what I mean ;-)). I also forgot lots of the english words for building a wooden build ship, sorry for that, and "help" is always appreciated. Anyway, as the build is allready in progress I will start with a little Photo-Story and some short comments, and will try to update the build regulary: Glueing the main wale made with ebony: Building the Gratings: Building the "don't know the word" Researching the Decklayout based on the original plan: The final Layout: Cheers, Dirk
  8. This is a reconstruction of the build log for my first wooden ship build, which I started in July 2011. Most of the construction on this model took place through the second half of 2011, before I took on a new role at work during early 2012 and moved to a new city. I can't overstate how important MSW has been to me throughout this build. The MSW forums are a great resource and an ongoing source of inspiration for me, and I doubt whether I would have been able to get as far as I have with this model without this site and the community here. Like many, I was disappointed when v1.0 of the site crashed and everything was lost. But I've been impressed by the speed with which moderators and other members have come together to rebuild the site and reconstruct the wealth of information that existed in v1.0. Given how much I owe to the MSW community of builders, I wanted to make my own small contribution to the reconstruction efforts and will document the course of my build here. Instead of re-creating every post, my aim is to post as many pictures as possible to chronicle the course of my build and highlight some of the things I learned along the way. Hopefully this will help future builders just as the many Sherbourne logs on MSW v1.0 helped and inspired me. Now that we've gotten that out of the way, let's get back to the shipyard. To start, the title of this build log is not a typo. Caldercraft sells this model as HMC Sherbourne but the name on the 1763 NMM plans is HMC Sherborne, so that's what I've decided to call it. (Edit: After writing this post, I noticed that one of the admins changed the title of this topic back to "Sherbourne" instead of "Sherborne," which is fine.) I chose the model as my first kit for a couple of reasons. First, I've always liked how cutters look. Second, the model seemed like a good starting point, with only a handful of cannons and relatively modest rigging. I wanted my build to be historically accurate, within the limits of my own skill and the available resources, so I purchased copies of all the Sherborne plans in the NMM collection. They weren't cheap, but I highly recommend them. The plans highlight the many small differences between the Caldercraft kit and what the actual Sherborne probably looked like. My aim is to bash the Caldercraft kit to more closely resemble the NMM plans. Early on, I made the decision to give my model a clinker (or lapstrake) hull. This was the type of hull construction used for most cutters during the last half of the 18th century. By the early 19th century, cutters were largely built using carvel planking. Suffice it to say there has been much debate about whether or not the Sherborne was built using clinker or carvel construction. I haven't seen any conclusive evidence one way or the other. I decided on a clinker hull because I think they look cool, and that style of planking seemed to me more typical of cutters built during this period. Best, Sumner
  9. Can't even remember if I had a buildlog up here for this baby, but anyway Teaser Pictures But as it might be interesting for someone you can check at least the build images here: Revenue Cutter Alert Build Images Part 1: https://picasaweb.google.com/112214601525161753861/ZollkutterAlertBaubilder?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCMDJmoPsx8ns0wE&feat=directlink Revenue Cutter Alert Build Images Part 2: https://picasaweb.google.com/112214601525161753861/ZollkutterAlertBaubilderTeil2?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCOjy96Lq77b35wE&feat=directlink Cheers, Dirk

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