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Found 170 results

  1. I have recently started to work on the US Brig Syren from Model Shipways. I just say these instructions by Chuck Passaro are too notch. I am currently working on the rabbit as seen in the photos.
  2. Hello all. I am about to embark on the build of the pride of Baltimore II. This will be my first attempt at ship modeling and plan on taking it step by step. I will be using the Bob Hunt practicum and refer to it throughout the build. I chose this ship since my daughter lives in Baltimore and I actually saw it in person and fell in love with it. Wish me luck. I’m going to need it. Sincerely Tony
  3. Hello everyone, this is my third kit build and my first build-log. I wanted to build the excellent cheerful semi-scratch cutter designed by Chuck Passaro next but decided to build this one first cause it was a gift from my wife last christmas and she keeps asking me when I will begin building it. So construction has begun with little one-year delay. The kit itself seems to be of good quality but I may replace some wood with boxwood and some cast-parts. First thing I did was to build a rack to put the model on during the construction. Then I carefully released the bulkheads to dry-fit on the keel.
  4. I received this kit as a gift. Very excited about it. Here are pics of the box & contents. Pre-reading over the first part of the instructions. Everything I've done before has been more simplified so I know this one will take me longer but I am ready to dive in!
  5. This is my first build. I tried a POF over 30 years ago and it was a disaster. I am giving it another try but decided to try a solid-hull instead of tackling planking. I selected the Katy of Norfolk by Model Expo. It appears this had been a planked model but has been reintroduced as a solid-hull model.
  6. Hello everyone. While I am not new to the ship modelling world this will be my first attempt at a build log, so please excuse any errors while i work my way through this. While I love the older period sailing ships, I recently tried my hand at steamers. I picked the Artesania Latina King of the Mississippi and enjoyed the build so much that I wanted to attempt another steamboat build. After reading several build logs on MSW and the reviews of the kits I decided on the Model Shipways Chaperon. I really like the quality and detail of their kits, and after completing the AL KotM, this is a real step up. I actually started the build a couple of weeks ago and while researching some of the builds came across Kurt Van Dahm's post for his article on his build of the Chaperon. Since I want to do this model justice I purchased his article to help me along the way. Since Kurt was so gracious to make this information available, I figure why not return the favor and start a build log. Anyway, like most, I won't bore you with the details of the kit contents since this has been done already, and jump right in with the build. Since i just now decided to start a build log, I have very few pictures of the beginning, however going forward I'll try to take more as I go along. Any and all comments and suggestions are always welcome. Thank you for looking. -Brian Here is what I have so far. Starting the hull. Bulkheads and stringers in place and first row of planking. Small planking completed and starting on the big planking.
  7. Since the Pandemic was declared on Friday (The 13th go figure.) it looked like I would have quite a bit of time available to actually write up a log for this ship that I started way back in 2013. At that time I was still getting my feet wet so to speak with computers. Writing a log, coordinating it with pictures and sending it through the computer was way out of my comfort zone back then. But since I started with my hybrid model of the 1:87 whaler Wanderer by Aurora and am doing a log for that during construction, I thought I’d do sort of a retroactive log of the construction of my Phantom. Since I am quite a ways into the build already, most of it is from memory and my notes. Eventually the log will catch up with the build, but as I am building both ships at the same time, it will undoubtedly take quite a while. Also, the photos were taken recently rather than during actual construction, so they will be mostly out of sync with the log. So without further ado here goes nothing.
  8. Well, here goes. This will be my 3rd build log on this site, the previous ones being the King of the Mississippi and the Bounty. Both of those projects were Atesania Latina kits. While I enjoyed building them, I did feel that the instructions left much to be desired. I was only able to complete the Bounty thanks to the full-scale plans and to the excellent advice, support, and direction found on this site. Anyway.... the USS Constitution! The Admiral gave me the Anatomy of the Ship book last Christmas, as I have been planning this as my next project for some time. The box arrived a week ago and I've commandeered my pool table as a good spot to spread everything out and check for damaged, missing, or warped parts. As far as I can tell, everything is in the box that is supposed to be there, though there does appear to be some discrepancy between exactly which sheets contain exactly which parts. This will the subject of some investigation over the next day or so, but I suspect it is only the result of some changes and additions to the supplied parts since the contents list was written nearly 20 years ago. I've already decided on one likely deviation from the supplied instructions, based on what I've seen in Captain Al's 'Mayflower' work. The Constitution kit does provide a fair amount of balsa filler blocks, but I am going to augment what was provided with enough filler blocks to give complete gluing surfaces to both the bow and stern curves. At least, that's my current plan. Here a few shots of the sorted contents of the kit...
  9. Hello all! This will be my build of the Continental Gunboat Philadelphia. A brief history of her is taken from the model shipways website. "Launched in August of 1776, the gunboat Philadelphia is the oldest American fighting vessel in existence. Part of the American fleet commanded by General Benedict Arnold, she sank on October 11, 1776 during the Battle of Valcour Island against the Royal Navy on Lake Champlain. She remained sitting upright in the cold waters of the lake until she was raised in 1935. Today, she’s on permanent exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C., complete with 24-pound ball that sent her to the bottom. " Length 26-3/8” Width 13-3/4” Height 24-5/8” Scale 1:24 (1/2” = 1 ft.) The actual gondolas built by Benedict Arnold were armed with two nine pounders, one twelve pounder and a few swivel guns. Arnold's gondolas were around 53 feet long with 15 1/2 foot beam and 2 foot draft. An overview image from the website is the following. The first few steps were pretty simple. I removed the parts I needed for the keel, stem and sternpost and glued them together. The keel was very straight with no noticeable war page. I sanded most of the laser char off. The pieces of wood that form the rabbets are pretty simple to carve. I just used an Xacto blade and a sanding block. There are also the visible parts of the stem and sternpost a which get narrower towards the ends. I have yet to make these rabbets at the bow. That's it for now. Thank you for looking in!
  10. I finally finished Syren after two years and five months so I started a smaller project as a "breather" before I launch into another multi-year build.
  11. It is time to start a new build; actually it is time to continue with existing build i started some time ago while still residing in my rented apartment. No room to do much but eager to get back to favourite hobby, i opened a box and started building it. Unfortunately at some point i realized that it is better to drop it back in the box and wait for better times, actually to get to the new place... After some time, my new shipyard was ready and it is time to start it again. So back to the shipyard after completion of Greek Birema, opened already opened box and started new ship building journey. I will be following Chuck Passaro's building practicum for Sultana. I think it is covering very interesting approach to build and very useful for people wishing to get back to this hobby. So lets start... This is a solid hull model, that need some adjustment during building process. First is to remove existing bulwarks that will be replaced with double planking. In the box we have some amount of planking material i will be replacing with basswood that i have in my shop. I will be cutting it on my mini table saw. Here is hull with removed bulwarks, at the deck level hull was sanded and some wood filler added to correct the hull shape. Ok, that is for now; see you all soon.. Happy modelling..
  12. Greetings! It is good to be back in the Shipyard! A long time ago (2009)in a city far, far away (Buffalo, NY) I started building the Model Shipways Bluenose using the Bob Hunt Practicum. Got the hull all planked, and I was really proud of my work. Had a really good build log going. Then life happened, and MSW crashed. The last couple weeks, thanks to a Coronavirus reduced work schedule, I have picked it back up. I had forgotten how much I really enjoyed this tiny intricate work. I have started on the deck “furniture” beginning aft, and working forward. So far I have completed the cabin (with binacle, skylight, chimney and gangway) the helm, bitts and boom crutch. Currently I am working on the rudder, pintles and gudgeons, and the boom sheet buffer. I have several dories made, but really am not happy with the way they look. What I am REALLY bad at, is remembering to take pictures. Here is one snapped by my daughter last night while I was making ring bolts.
  13. This kit wasn’t planned. I was struggling to find a suitable ship’s boat for my Royal Caroline when I came across Blue Ensign’s excellent Pegasus build log. B.E. based his boat on Model Shipway’s Pinnace, scaling down the plans to his smaller scale. I decided to do the same. I was pleased with the result, and am looking forward to completing the kit as intended. I debated whether or not to start a log – there are already several very good Pinnace logs on the forum and I wasn’t sure I would be able to add anything useful. However I decided that logs aren’t just about showcasing advanced skills, they’re also about those of us with more modest abilities learning as we go, and especially learning from our mistakes and sharing those experiences. I scratch built the small version from boxwood, but for this model I plan to use the supplied timber for the frames, keel, stem and stern post then mill my own planks and internal fittings. The other decision I've made in advance is to leave out the rather strange extension piece at the stern. As the original model and plans were by Chuck Passaro I'm sure this extension is historically accurate, however I just find it odd. I'm sure a practically-minded captain would have drawn the line at such a fragile and seemingly useless piece of decoration! I left it out on the Caroline build and I liked the result so I'll do the same here. Anyway, I'm looking forward to a comparatively short project and my first build log.
  14. Finally got around to starting this old "yellow box" solid hull of USS Essex. Was boxed in 1957! and the contents were 99% there. Got it on Ebay for $15 and put it on the back shelf where it remained for a while. I intend on making it into a "half hull" with the masts and yards in half also. Gonna mount it to an interesting board of some sort (maybe driftwood). I'll probably also start another project at the same time and fiddle with this one here and there. Began cutting gun ports and shaping quarter gallery for a start. The cast parts are remarkably detailed and clean. Like on the gun port lids (that are only about 1/8" square), hinges are evident! The gun carriages and guns are also clean and detailed. The direction manual though is bad. If this was someone's first build, they would be lost! Oh well, should be fun to experiment with. I'll try to keep it in the spirit of the real Essex anyways.
  15. After a 45-year hiatus from my first build (Model Shipways Rattlesnake solid hull) I decide to build another. I'm retired and living in a condo, so I needed a hobby. I chose the Fair American because it was similar to the Rattlesnake, and I wanted to try a plank-on-bulkhead model. I started the build April 12, 2019. So far, I'm pleased with the progress. I wish that had taken more progress photos. Going forward, I will try to take more photos to document the progress. When I received the kit, I went through the parts list to make sure everything was in the box. I labeled some wood parts but not all. In hindsight, I wish I had labeled all the wood parts. Like some other modelers, I found the keel was too short. I made one of the proper length from scrape material and continued on.
  16. Edit: Adding an index Section 1 - Pre-planking work. Beginning the bulkheads Shimming the bulkheads Cutting the Rabbet Reinforcing the bulkheads Fairing bulkhead tops and placing sub-decks Shimming bulkhead extensions and fairing Stern building issues Stern construction Knights heads and first planks Waterways and transom work Section 2 - First planking and surrounding work. Stern windows and planking Outer bulwark planking Lower planking part 1 Side-bar - Reno trip Lower planking part 2 Lower planking part 3 Lower planking part 4 Section 3 - Wales and inner bulwarks Wales part 1 Wales part 2 and spirketing plank 1 Spirketing plank 2 Inner bulwarks The black strake & inner bulwarks painting Scuppers and inner bulwarks painting Outer bulwarks 2nd planking and more painting Outer bulwarks 2nd planking and Cap Rail Stern cap rail and planking Section 4 - Outer painting and 2nd planking below wales. Bulwark painting Lower planking part 1 Lower planking part 2 Lower planking part 3 Lower planking part 4 Lower planking part 5 Lower planking part 6 Planking time-lapse video Lower planking completion Sweep ports part 1 Sweep ports part 2 Section 5 - Deck & furniture Main hatch and scuttle port Companionway Deck planking begins Remaking the galley hatch Deck planking continued Deck planking complete - tree nailing Planking the poop deck Guns! Rudder Rigging the Cannons - beginning Ships wheel Rigging the Cannons - continued Rigging the Cannons - rope coils Stropping a single block Making the Catheads Elm tree pumps Ladders and Binnacle Swivel gun posts and channels Chain plates & dead-eyes Section 6 - Masts & Standing Rigging Bowsprit sheaves & main mast construction Jib boom & Top mast Gaff, boom & yards Swivel Gun yoke jig Swivel Gun soldering - mount, yoke, handles. Main mast standing rigging begins Shroud Lanyards Mounting the Bowsprit Bobstay & Forestay Naming Day Section 7 - Running Rigging Beginning the running rigging Sidebar - San Diego Festival of Sail trip (link to other thread) Running rigging completed Rope coils Anchor buoys End of the line ------------------------------ Beginning of build log: Just starting up the log with what appears to be the traditional 'unboxing' post. This was actually done on September 6th, but I did not see any point in opening a build log while I was still working on the Carmen, as I'm not going to attempt to do multiple builds at once yet (no room, even if I wanted to). I took inventory using the parts list included, and everything seems to be ship-shape. I will likely not actually begin working on this until the weekend, as I've got an idea for a display stand for the Carmen to take to my office (my not at home office), and now that I'm done building the Carmen, I want to read through the instructions and some build logs for the AVS before I begin. Until then, here are the unboxing photo's.
  17. Dear Friends, It's been a while since I've built my first model so I've finally decided to continue with this wonderful hobby. After some doubts on whick kit to choose I went for the Confederacy from Model Shipways. I've ordered it through Cornwall Models in the UK and the've dispatched it the same day - amazing service! Got the kit yesterday and to be honest I was slightly dissapointed with the quality of the castings (ok I knew it from this forum they are not amazing), but also some laser cut parts came off as they were not properly packed. Anyway seems that all the little pieces are intact
  18. Hi everyone, I just finished building the Greyhound by Corel at 1:100 scale. I have placed a few pics of it in the Gallery. I just started my new build of the Charles Morgan and will post pics as I go! I purchased the kit from Model Expo and have been a long time customer of theirs. After inventory of everything in the box I was short 30 pieces of 1/16 X 3/32 X 24" and short 2 pieces of 1/16 X 1/4 X 24". I contacted Frank at Model Expo and these were sent out ASAP no problems! They do indeed stand behind their product. This is one reason I like getting things from them if they have what I'm looking for. The Keel, stem and stern post went together well and were all very straight. I tried something different this time and won't know how well it will work or how clean it will look until I start planking the hull. I took the center keel before gluing on the false keel, stem and stern pieces and after marking the bearding line used my Dremel tool sander instead of chisel. Then I glued the remaining flat surface to the full-size stem, false keel and stern pieces. I'd appreciate any input if others have done this and if it worked well for you. I then pre-shaped and dry fitted the bulkheads. Once square they were glued in place and I then did some additional bevel cutting and sanding. I suspect there will be some tweaking along the way. I then cut and installed the stern stems. Make sure you align the posts and watch the height making sure not to cut them too short. I then installed the Planksheer and even though I was careful I managed to break (several times) the part going around the bow. I then installed the stanchions and it's very important to make sure they are aligned and most important that when you install the mainrail (again I managed to break this very thin piece several times) they leave enough overhang so that it will accommodate the batten planks. I looked at a few other build logs at this point and of interest, after the hull was planked it was eventually sanded smooth. However, one would then have to add a fashion piece that is usually painted white along the outside of the plank sheer and I suppose main rail. This was troubling for me and I had to cut off all stanchions and realign to accommodate the stepped look. I really don't know if that was the correct thing to do or take the easy way out, sand the whole thing smooth and add the extra piece later??? Now, currently I'm struggling with the stanchions on the bow that go from the main rail down to the filler block. And, at the same time keep the exterior "future" planking aligned with the balance of other stepped planking. The problem is that the interior bow has this ceiling and waterway planks that are supposed to be sweeping up and smooth (just at the bow). I've taken this apart a few times and naturally busted up the plank sheer and main rail several times. I look at the blueprint sheets everything lines up but I just don't have the sweeping angle it needs. I'll keep messing with this until I get it! Meantime any advice is always welcome. Also, I'm thinking of getting a ropewalk jig. Is Model Expos as cheap as it looks? I'm also thinking of ordering a few different chemicals from Jax to oxidize the copper plates before I install them. I was then thinking of putting a sealer on them before handling and installing? I really like the way the Model Shipways picture on their kit looks. Frank said the guy that built it actually used paper! you could use a thick paper and still roll over it with the ponce wheel to get the rivet effect. But, I'll use the copper and will sample a bunch of different shades and methods. Do I want more realistic or what appeals to "me"!!!
  19. All, Back to ships! With so many excellent builds of the Syren here on the site, I have decided to put my skills to the test and give her a whirl. I'll need all the help I can get, as this will be my first plank on bulkhead build. Looking through the other logs, I can tell there will be more scratch work than I have done to date, too. I am really looking forward to the journey! All parts have been accounted for. Plucking out the keel board, the very first order of business is to straighten it out. There is a slight curve to it, so I gave it a quick soak in water and have clamped it flat. We'll see how it looks in a couple of days when dry. The curve is slight, so filler blocks would very likely be able to set it right, but I like to make things a little easier on myself. Making those filler blocks is something I am not quite sure that I am looking forward to doing. Well, I can say this: my woodworking skills are going to get a workout! Onward! ~john
  20. Well ordered the model and after reading about a dozen threads on here I'm about to start my first wooden model build. I'm totally new to this so please bear with me if my terminology is incorrect at times 🙂
  21. So - after several hours without a model in the drydock (which is actually a lie - it just wasn't out of the box yet) I've started my Bluenose build. I haven't got further than seperated the keel and bulkheads from their sheets yet, and started some careful sanding to get rid of burn marks before my first questions pops up. 1. Do you cut the rabbet line before or after you have assembled the keel? I'm leaning towards before to make the handling easier. 2. Do you bevel the bulkheads any before you add them to the keel, or do you do all the beveling after assembly? I'm wondering if assembling the jkeel and put everything temporarily in place and then bevel a little bit here and a little bit there until everything is smooth is my plan - unless someone persuade me otherwise.
  22. Greetings to all fellow model shipwrights. I am working on Model Shipways Pride of Baltimore II. I have done a few previous kits from Dumas and MidWest, with some rather nice results and have decided to make this a lifetime hobby. I'm throwing this build log up to get some help as I go along and provide some inspiration to others starting out. I am thinking that I am a younger member here (43) and love that this hobby is still going on. A little about me, so that all other readers can get where I am coming from. I am a nuclear physicist. I grew up on the chesapeake bay and my father had a Morgan 28' outisland that I learned to sail on. I'm a bit of a perfectionist and love how this hobby combines the meticulous nature of a technical build with the final result of a beautiful piece of what I would call architectural art. Here is where I am at... early stages. I got the kit and set out to getting started. One thing that struck me was the imperfections of the cuts and plans... A lot is off by ~ 1/16th". I know that this is art, not technical designs, but my machinists would have kittens if I provided parts this far off. That being said, I have been consulting a great book that my wife gave me; "Ship[ Modeling Simplified" by Frank Mastini. So far, it has been crucial in getting the bulkheads symmetric and centered. Here are the current pictures. I have tapered the false keel and used machinist blocks to get dowels (I filed down tooth picks) centered. I glued the keel/stem assembly to the false keel. Also, I have marked (the now centered and symmetric) bulkheads for tapering. One extra note that makes this build a little more difficult and unique. I have a 2 y.o. son who thinks that the most important thing in his life his to get his hands on the parts and 'help.' My wife is a NICU nurse who works nights so I have a lot of parenting time, and building this model is a little harder with a toddler trying to crawl up your leg.
  23. I just got a used 1/4=1 MS Katy of Norfolk schooner off of ebay the other day and I need some advice on it. The kit is MISSING the following items: rings for the sails, the boom/gaff yokes, parrel beads, an anchor the belaying pins they say should be in the kit, the rudder, rudder hinge, rudder bar, keel stem and stern post instructions that make a modicum of sense. (what's in included is rubbish), blocks and deadeyes that are not 1/8" in size, mastcaps. What IS in the kit: hull (partly carved), rigging, a packed of itty bitty deadeyes, a packet of really tiny nails, a packet of blocks that a spider couldn't fit a web through the hole, wood for the masts, bowsprit, blocks to carve for the hatch/cabin, two pieces of wood I am guessing I am suppose to make the sternpost, rudder bar and keel stem from, really useless instructions, a packet of itsy bitsy teeny weenie eye pins. I will use the instructions to make sail templates and then make them from silkspan So what i need is advice on where to buy the blocks (in bulk), deadeyes (in bulk), anchor, bit heads or belaying pins (in bulk), mast caps (I will probably make these). The other thing is SIZE of the items needed. Most everything is in MM out there and I don't know what MM is close to scale for 1/4 inch = 1 foot. thanks, Keith BUILDS : AL Scottish Maid (complete) AL Virginia Schooner (under construction)
  24. Just started this kit-- Question: in cutting the rabbet,do you cut from the bearding line to the edge of the false keel on the stern half as per MS plans? (It's a pretty big rabbet ) I cut it per plans,but the hull shape has me baffled as to how to plank. I'd like to be able to make sense of it before proceeding w bulkheads etc. Any suggestions will be appreciated.
  25. I can honestly say that if I was not a member of MSW, it would not have occurred to me to build this boat. After admiring usedtosail's build, I did a search and found a wealth of other builds on MSW. I have pored over them in detail, and I managed to gain an appreciation of the kit's idiosyncrasies even before I started. These are the other build logs on MSW: Cap'n Rat Fink Meredith Tom Bombadillo usedtosail Many years ago, when I built the Artesania Bounty, I built a Launch as well. Here it is: What I wish to do is build a larger model of this launch, with missing planking on the starboard side, showing off the frames, admiralty style. I also plan to ignore the paint scheme as suggested by the kit (which I find to be rather ugly) and finish the boat to my liking. Along the way I will hopefully be guided by some reading material: Anyway, on to the model and unboxing photos. Photograph of the box. Instruction manual and plans. The manual can be downloaded from MS' website here. Up to now, I have been building kits by Artesania, Amati, etc. and have come to expect poor quality instructions in poor English. I was blown away by the detail in these instructions for such a simple boat. They even specify what type of blade you should use to carve the rabbet! Unfortunately, everything is in Imperial units, so I have been keeping my metric converter busy. The model is built on a jig. Pre-cut planking strakes are supplied. Bulkheads for the construction jig. Note the planking guide and fairing guide. The instructions tell you to fair the bulkheads to the dotted line. Easy enough to do. More parts. Note that the all builders of the Launch on the other logs complained about the laser lettering on the Transom, and here it is! Awful decision by the kit designer. I tried to sand the lettering off, but it goes down way too deep. Short of painting the transom (I wish to leave it stained and unpainted), some solution has to be found. More pre-cut planks. Finally, the sailcloth and various little accessories. ... and my pristine (for now) workplace with my new modelling lamp We're all ready, let's get started.

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