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Found 7 results

  1. I finished my first RC scratch built square rigger HMS Harrier a couple of years back and although I'm very happy with the result always considered her something of a practice run for the command that everyone wants - a frigate. Check out Harrier in action on video. With the current pandemic making the full sized sailing dinghy I was hoping to start this year look just that - hopeful - there's no time like the present to start the frigate. She's relatively cheap, being cobbled up from old floor boards and ply with the only realtively expensive bits being servos. She'll be easy to break into storeable stages if the world comes to rights and the financial situation lets me build a real boat, and also a bit of a challenge that should take at least a couple of years. So, which frigate? I love the the Artois class like HMS Diana as per the fine examples built by the likes of Jason and Barbossa on MSW but as a 38 gun vessel it's 146ft on the gun deck and getting quite large for transport at a 1.2m hull in 1/36 scale. Also, while the rest ofthe Anatomy of the Ship book is very detailed, the lines needed to reproduce a hull shape in my copy are not very detailed. The Enterprise class is a bit smaller at 120ft with all the attributes of a frigate and has the advantage of being repesented in some detailed orignal ship plans in Greenwhich's National Martime Museum; There are some very colourful contemporary paintings done by Jospeh Marshall as part of a series of ship models to stoke Geroge III's interest in the navy; He dubbed the ship Enterprize, interchanging the Z with an S as was common at the time but most records of the time and modern scholarship have her as Enterprise. The clincher is a very detailed set of plans from Polish model company Shipyard, which also does smaller scale card models of Enterprise and her sister ship Cleopatra. The Shipyard plans cover everything from hull and deck layouts through fitout including guns, boats, masts and spars in a variety of scales ranging from 24,72, 96,192 etc depending on size. The bit where it falls down are the carvings and decorations, which appear speculative at best and include a lion figurehead more suitable for a ship of the early 1700s. The idea for this build is to try to combine the best of the modern plans for a fairly accurate sailing model, with the contemporary plans and paintings to give the full bling of a Georgian vessel. While it's a little uncertain whether a vessel in service would have carried full freizework and decoration, I've always wanted to try my hand at it and the goal is something that looks like a contemporary ship model that can be sailed. As such, the ship will be one of the class, and generally correct for the period but with some speculation on decoration depending which vessel I end up depicting. GIven the diverse sources it'll be a model of a painting of a ship model, so I think that'll give me a bit of latitude. We'll see how close I get to the goal of a big 1770s Navy Board model you can drop in the lake. A little about the Enterprise class: A sixth rate Designed by John WIlliams in 1770, the first five of this class were ordered for the Falklands Islands emergency. Fox, Syren, Surprise and Enterprise and Acteon were launched from the early 1770s through to 1775. Another 15 vessels followed in 76-78 and another seven in 82-83 with solid quarter deck bulkheads. They saw service during the Revolutionary War, with many Enterprises active on the American station against US privateers, at the relief of Gibralter, in the Mediterranean, Caribbean, including at the battle of the Saintes, around the North Sea and French coasts and even the battle of Cuddalore in the Indian Ocean. They were active ships, with losses to weather and enemy action that reflected this, although some limped through as troop ships or on harbour duty until late in the Napoleonic wars. Length on gundeck: 120ft Breadth: 33ft 9 inches Crew: 200 Initial armament: Upper deck: 24 x 9lbers, Quarter deck: 4x3lbers. By 1780 the quarter deck armament was 4x6lbers plus 4 18lb carronades and another two on the forecastle. Making a start The shipyard plans were scaled up to 1/36 scale and details like framing station lines, fixtures for the ballast keel, ply deadwood, rough places for servos and battery and other details drawn in. The plans have station molds indicated, which were expanded to show the 12mm ply that will be used for framing. Some initial work on the masts is visible below. More on that in the next post. The Enterprise hull is roughly 1m on the deck, slightly bigger than Harrier at 80cm and has a much greater internal volume, which should hopefully make some of the fitout easier, although there are issues around internal access with a quarterdeck as well as the main deck. Rough overall length with bowsprit should be 1.6-1.7m, with the masts standing about that tall from the keel, although they will collapse for transport. It should fit in the family wagon, if not it'll have to go in my camping trailer, although my wife is asking where it'll fit in the garage already containing a car, canoe, kayak, the Harrier, kids' bikes, clothesline and my workbench and tools...
  2. Since other members have posted extensive build reports of this boat kit I will focus primarily on the choices I have made. The main issue of the kit is the scroll parts for the bow and stern which are far too thick. This is the solution I opted for : Some modifications to turn the model into a working rc one : I have also added some 1/24 figures (I will order or make some more in the future): I have finally finished the shields and now I'm going to tackle the oars (also a rather boring and repetitive job). I think that the oars should all have a different length (the midships ones should be shorter than those closer to the bow and stern), although BB do not refer to this in their instructions. Regards, Arjan
  3. Hello all. It's my first post here so a little about myself. Like many here, I suspect, I returned to the model hobby in my late twenties after a hiatus of 15 yrs or so. Since then I have made a number of wooden vessels, from kits, and I also very much enjoy bringing plastic kits mechanically to life - which is the main theme of my Youtube channel 'Gonzo mechanic'. This current project was spurred by reading about the naval campaigns of World War Two. I was fascinated to find out that the Duke of York (Capt. Guy Russell) took on and destroyed the Scharnhorst at night, in an Arctic storm, with gunnery controlled entirely by radar. Before reading about this, I had not realised that such a thing was possible in this period of the war. Indeed, it turns out Russell specially trained his gunnery teams to fight at night having discovered weaknesses in night-time drill during his time on the Nelson. Unluckily for the crew of the Scharnhorst, the Royal Navy presented the right man with right ship in the right place at the right time. I had planned to convert the Tamiya Prince of Wales to show the Duke of York in her post '44 re-fit form as the amount of anti-aircraft weaponry was truly awe inspiring: 12 pom-pom mounts (!) 2 quadruple bofors mounts and eight or so twin powered oerlikon turrets plus numerous single emplacements for the same weapon. It almost seems a pity this was never tested. However, over time, I decided to do the more familiar 1943 look as this is a rare example of a paint scheme mainly intended for fighting fight in the dark of the Arctic winter when the Russia convoys tended to run. Having bought an addtional KGV kit to borrow the waist boat platform I decided to build this later and she will form a later posting. Sources So what did she actualy look like? I bought the KGV series book by Witold Koszela and a book of drawings of the DoY by the same author. I also found this site https://www.naval-history.net/xGM-Chrono-01BB-Duke of York.htm which turned out to be vital. Finally, there are the pictures from the IWM website of which the series taken at Rosyth 'from the 100 ton crane' are easily the most important. However, beware pictures from the IWM site. Several turned out to be mirror images which resulted in quite a lot of wasted time. Some aspects of the ship are 'handed' - like the roof of the cabin abaft the main director and the mysterious little tub thing on the stbd. side of the forward superstructure and these need to be checked. Also the date appears to be wrong because on the 1 November 1943 the DoY was in Scapa not Rosyth. The pictures more likely date from around January to March that year. The Koszela material is helpful in many ways but many details are wrong or missing. We'll come to those later. Finally the Pontos set while also hugely helpful is also missing a number of items and is also wrong in detail in some places. In other words this project has required careful synthesis from disparate and sometimes conflicting sources. Some aspects remain unresolved and it will be most interesting to see if others here can shed light on them. It is, then, a source of some surprise that is can be so hard to piece together a reasonably faithful image of one of the largest warships the UK has ever put to sea - even within living memory. First up: the hull This, like all my plastic projects, is going to be rc so it can be filmed. There are various conversion kits for other vessels available but I decided to use my 3D printer to make a motor and servo mount. Anything to do with rc has to be maintainable because the first law of sod is that anything inaccessible will break first. In addition, and without disrespect to the many very fine modellers who use them this way, I could not face having the wooden deck show up with a 'real-world' 10" step - so joined the plastic deck together and cut a rebate around the edge so that it, with the wooden deck added, would fit flush with the hull sides. Here you can see the 3d printed motor mount and dog bones. I inserted small brass washers where the dog-bones met the mount. Stern glands Rudder pintle On the right you can see, just about the rebate cut into the under edge of the deck. This was a tiresome process involving a mini-router. N.B. the hull on the left is for the KGV hence stern windows but is otherwise identical to my DoY Next up: alterations to the forward superstructure.
  4. I have been part of a tug/barge project over the past year. This project has involved designing everything using Fusion360. I am now back to regular physical modelling but started a new private project. This involves a motor yacht from 1930, I have the plans so it will be a fairly easy work to create a 3d model. But I won't stop there, my intention is to create frames and parts for building her as a RC yacht. Here is a picture of her as on plan.
  5. Anyone know of any suppliers of decent larger size rigging blocks. I'm building an RC square rigger at 1/36 scale and need blocks about 7-12mm in size. They don't have to be functional, just strong and look the part in wood.
  6. Well, it took time but now all the racing upgrades are done. The servo for main sheet is a digital high torque 120 degree throw servo. The original high torque is powering the rudder. The clew in the jib and main are adjustable along with the cunningham plus vang for the main. The sheet lines are adjustable as well
  7. So I was pressed by the Admiral to sell my dream car a 1971 beetle. The car was out of capabilities to repair and she didn't like it sitting around. She was very generous though in that she told me I could take a portion of the money and get my self something. I have been wanting to build an rc sail boat for some time but now I finally have some money to throw at it. I will admit I am one of those crazies that doesn't want to do a T(numeral) kit. I want to do something I think is a little more fun. I know it's crazy but so am I. What I'm thinking of doing is a simple ship like the Ferret in the book "Story of Sail". The sails won't be far from a beginners kit type ship just a gaff along with the boom on the mainsail and an extra jib. I have the plans more or less figured out but I'm not sure what to do as far as electronics. I know I need servos a receiver and remote but which ones are best? Where's the best place to get them? Is there anything I'm missing or should know? Thank you for your advice.

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