Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'shipyard'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Captain's Cabin
    • Questions/instructions on how to use and post to this forum/Site Problems or suggestions
    • New member Introductions
    • Group Projects on Model Ship World
  • Member's Build Logs
    • Build Logs for SHIP MODEL KITS
    • Build Logs for SCRATCH SHIP MODEL PROJECTS
  • Shop Notes, Ship Modeling Tips, Techniques and Research
    • Nautical/Naval History
    • Ships plans and Project Research. General research on specific vessels and ship types..
    • Building, Framing, Planking and plating a ships hull and deck
    • Discussion for a Ship's Deck Furniture, Guns, boats and other Fittings
    • Masting, rigging and sails
    • Model Tips and Tricks and Making Jigs
    • Modeling tools and Workshop Equipment
    • Metal Work, Soldering and Metal Fittings
    • Wood discussion
    • Painting, finishing and weathering products and techniques
    • CAD and 3D Modelling/Drafting Plans with Software
  • Ship Modeling News And Reviews.....Traders and Dealers...Ship Model Clubs
    • General Ship Model Kit Discussions
    • Reviews
    • Book, Monograph and Magazine reviews and Downloads. Questions and Discussions for Books and Pubs
    • Traders, Dealers, Buying or Selling anything? - Discuss New Products and Ship Model Goodies here as well!!
    • NAUTICAL RESEARCH GUILD - News & Information
    • Important Ship Model Club News, Links to ship modelling resources and museums
  • The Crew's Lounge
    • Nautical General Discussion
    • Shore Leave
  • Medway Longboat Group Project's Medway Longboat Build Logs
  • Medway Longboat Group Project's Plans and Instructions/Downloads
  • Medway Longboat Group Project's General discussions/How to join
  • Rope Making/Ropewalks's Ropewalk Plans/Downloads
  • Rope Making/Ropewalks's Discussions about Rope Making
  • Rope Making/Ropewalks's Rope Materials and parts resources
  • Rope Making/Ropewalks's Commercial sources for ropewalk machines
  • Intro to carving - typical decorative relief carving for ship models's Build Logs for the Carving Group Project
  • Intro to carving - typical decorative relief carving for ship models's Tutorials and Discussion for the Carving Group
  • Intro to carving - typical decorative relief carving for ship models's How to join this Carving Group
  • HMS Triton - 28 gun frigate's Cross Section Build Logs for HMS TRITON
  • HMS Triton - 28 gun frigate's Build Logs for the Full Hull Version of HMS TRITON
  • HMS Triton - 28 gun frigate's How to Join The HMS TRITON Group Build
  • HMS Winchelsea 1764's Member Build logs for the HMS Winchelsea
  • HMS Winchelsea 1764's General project discussions on planking, fittings and monograph chapters
  • HMS Winchelsea 1764's How to join this group project???

Calendars

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


NRG Membership Number

Found 4 results

  1. I had a search, but couldn't find any other build logs of this model, so although I feel deeply unqualified, I thought I'd post a build log. This is the first card model I've built - in fact, it is mainly paper, with a laser-cut card frame (ShipYard also do a card version which is 1:72, and much more expensive!). So this won't be a masterclass, but hopefully the surprises and lessons learned as I go will be helpful to someone else following in my footsteps I started this model last year when I went on holiday - my main build is way too big to travel, so this one is more manageable (and a little less anti-social) - it may take me a while to finish, but hopefully I'll get there. I started by assembling the card structure of the ship. The diagrams provided are excellent, and the laser-cutting so good that this was very simple, and with a little care, it went together very nicely. I've read elsewhere that using a little superglue to wick into the extensions at the tops of the bulkheads strengthens them somewhat... I was too slow, and they got pretty mashed up. I'm hoping I'll be able to make up for that later on. So far, I've skinned the lower part of the hull, and started putting the details onto the gundeck. Here's a slightly more in-depth description of what I've learned, and done so far. Basic tools: Carpenters glue (Aliphatic) UHU glue (really really useful!) Pritt stick Superglue Lots of sharp xacto blades #11 and a handle Cutting mat 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2mm card to stick the paper onto where directed. (This was found in my local art supplies shop - I found it really hard to get online) 1. Assemble the frame from the laser-cutting. I used Carpenters glue to do this, and lego bricks to check it was all lined up... I think this was probably overkill, because with the deck on, it's pretty rigid, but it was my first attempt so I wanted to make sure it was all perfect. Sandpaper was useful to bevel the frames once put together... the card won't go over them (or have a flat surface to stick to) without this step, so it's pretty crucial. That said, it's pretty quick compared to bevel the frames on wooden models... that means it's even easier to go too far! - I marked the edges of the bulwarks with a marker so I could tell when I was not only reducing one side, but the overall outline of the bulwark. Once the frame was built, a couple of detail bits get stuck on to the lower deck (a brown sharpie was useful to edge the bits that are cut out to get rid of the white edges and make it look tidy), and then the false deck was then added... I made a mistake here by splurging on carpenters glue thinking that the paper covering would lie flat if only I pushed it down enough... not so much, it seems. It ended up looking horribly bumpy and I thought I'd wrecked the model... The answer (for me) it turns out is to use UHU, add it to the card, and then use a piece of card to scrape it and make it nice and flat, then add the paper, smoothing it as you go. This ends up in a nice flat surface... Thankfully, as we'll see, the false deck gets covered over later with a second 0.5mm sheet of card with the real gundeck pattern glued on top of it, so disaster was well and truly averted, and you'd never know I stuffed up now! Here's the first gun deck - you can't see the bumps, but trust me... they're there! More later. Rob
  2. Well, I’ve done it. I started messing around with a card model from Shipyard because I was really curious about them. I didn’t mean to turn this into a real project, but I can’t help it, this thing is so frikkin’ cool! I’ve already described the kit in detail in the topic I started: here, so no point in rehashing that. I’ll just say that I’ve been distracted by this model more and more and now I might as well just get it over with and make a regular project out of it. Luckily, this card model seems to be progressing a lot faster than my wooden model projects. I think it’s because all the parts are already defined. I don’t have to figure out anything, I just have to build. So, I started tinkering with this kit back in August and picked it up every now and again to add some more to it. Now, I’m at the point where I’m spending multiple evenings in a row on it. At this rate, I don’t think it’s going to take all that long. I'd better really get working on this or I'll never get back to my other projects! Here’s where it all started... Framing was easy using the laser cut parts included in the kit. Note that not all of the shipyard paper models include laser cut framing. Instead, they give you the parts printed on standard paper and you are required to laminate that paper onto layers of card stock or plain paper in order to build the part up to the proper thickness. On a model this size, the frame density and the stiffeners seem to make the hull enough to work with The first layer of the hull covering is made up of thin pieces that fit nicely across the bulkheads. It's hard to avoid a little overlap, but I found it important to try, otherwise it creates a wavy surface for the planking. With the layer of stiffners in place, the first layer of hull planking is laid. There are two layers of planking, so I guess you can consider this a double-planked hull. The first layer consist of belts of planks. It's nice that these are printed with properly shaped planks. This makes this model more accurate than 90% of the wooden ship models kits out there, at least in terms of hull planking. The first problem I ran into was the in determining the proper positioning of the bulwarks piece. But, that looks like it will work itself out okay. The second problem is shown here with the laying down of the planking belts. This is a 2-D object laying down on a 3-D surface. The belts are relatively narrow, but not narrow enough to avoid creating a wavy surface along the edges. Fortunately, there is another layer of planking to go over this, so maybe I was worrying about it too much. But, what I found was that after the glue set, I could wick a tiny amount of CA into the edge and then push down on the bumps to flatten them out a bit. That has it's own hazzards as you can see here the glue fingerprints that I haven't seen since my early days of plastic model building. This is the point where I decided to try painting the surface of the hull using paints sold by ShipYard. Clare
  3. Hello friends, I'm starting a project here is mixture of research and building. As I came from the plastic kit bashing side of the modelling society I'm fed up with the chequebook modelling destroing any creativity. So as I'm in a new less payed job I changed my mind to a more creative and less expensive theater of the hobby: cardboard modelling. The scale fits to my flat's size. Sorry for my bad English - I'm not rearly far away from my school standards 30 years ago. Base of my project is the early Shipyard plan of Le Coureur the French lugger in 1/96. The little ship that was taken 1778 by HMCutter Alert - and what a nice and heartwarming thing it is that due to this find we have got the plans in the NMM. It is the basis of the Bourdriot monographie. The are three important sources of knowledge for me strating in the modelship's world: A. Petesson - Fore and After Rigging B. Bouriot - Le Coureur Monographie C. Friends of the Navy Museum - Plan (1960th?) (D. a www-copy if the NMM-plan) The Peterson shows the rigging of a bigger and in some details differing lugger from the same timeframe. The monographie is very good and well detailed - I decided to take the save route and ordered a new issiue at www.ancre.fr so the money was directly. with the drawer. And I was shure to get a complete set of plans. The Paris Museum's plan is based on the Admirals Pâris drawings and showing a simpler rigging with a diffrend decks layout. The NMM plan shows a superstructure in red on deck - the Shipyard kit shows hatches. Boudriot draws his particular part in dotted lines in one deck's sideview. I decided to trust in the NMM plan and in Ancre, too. So I've figured out the kitmakers at Shipyard followed the plan of the Paris Naval Museum. The similarity of the stern decorations are also evident. So the list of errors, carenesslesses and force to construct a buildable cardboard kit've born an intersting fundament of a nice little ship. As I'm not a francophone person, I have got my. problems with the texts in the monographie. But from all the three sourced it seems to be the one of the highest quality. So here some first impressions for you about the similarity of the kit and the Paris Plan. 1. The sternview of the ParisPlan 2. Some picture from the Shipyard manual showing the missing badge 3. The “KateWinslet leaving step“ in the topview 4. same area in the manual 5. my hobby ship yard. These as some first impressions for you. At the moment I'm struggling with the lasercut cardboard hull and its plywood filling I've get tip in a German forum.
  4. Hello, everyone! I am currently preparing to build my first wooden ship model (the Amati/Victory Models Lady Nelson). I have been reading up on the various techniques needed to construct the hull, and while I wait for the kit to arrive, I thought I'd go about gathering some basic tools to help me with the build. I thought it might be a good idea to list the various tools that I have purchased (or will purchase) so that all the knowledgeable and experienced members of this forum can let me know if I'm forgetting something important. Since this is my first build (and I'm on a budget), I am keeping it simple and sticking to basic hand tools -- you won't find any lathes or Dremels in this list! I'm not going to be using any special plank-bending tools, as the "old school" method of soaking the planks, bending them over the bulkheads, clamping them, and allowing them to dry before attachment really appeals to me (and seems like a great way to get a really nice fit). I should also mention that, for now, I'm focusing on the tools I will need to construct the hull (I don't want to get ahead of myself). When it comes time to do the rigging, I will obtain a few extra tools, such as picks/hooks and perhaps a "helping hands" with a magnifier. So, here's my list: Deluxe Ship Modeler's Tool Set (I found a great deal on this set, and since I don't have any of the tools included with it, I thought it would be a good place to start; the set includes 3 hobby knives with 15 assorted blades, aluminum miter box with razor saw blade, pointed nose tweezers, flush cutter with spring-loaded handles , aluminum awl, 4 assorted gouges, 2 small needle files, pin vise with 3 micro drill bits, and a wooden sanding block with wedge) Mantua Strip Clamp (doubles as a keel clamp for hull work and a plank vise with a metal edge to assist in planing planks when tapering) Additional needle files (to supplement the contents of the kit) Miniature wood plane (1" wide) Analog calipers (I chose these over digital calipers for the savings, and the lack of batteries required) Small square Ruler Metal compass and mechanical pencil Emery boards Sandpaper (assorted grits) White wood glue CA glue Wood filler Small folding clips (the black metal clips with silver metal arms; for clamping during hull planking) T-pins Q-Tips Index cards Self-healing cutting mat Swing-arm lamp (with magnifier) From what I can tell, this list seems to include the essentials that I'll need to do a good job, while not being too pricey. Let me know what you think! Thanks!

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...