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thomaslambo

HMS Bounty by thomaslambo - Artesania Latina – Scale 1:48

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Hi Everyone,

 

This is my first build log so needless to say I’m looking forward to sharing my experience as well as getting some constructive feedback from some of the more experienced builders.

 

I choose the AL HMS Bounty kit because of the open hull design which I think will make a great display model.  Also, I enjoyed all the Mutiny on the Bounty films so that provided additional motivation.

 

I’ve spent time reading “The Armed Transport Bounty (The Anatomy)” which was recommended to me by one of the members (a great reference book for any Bounty model builder).

 

I plan to do extensive modifications to the kit (many based on The Anatomy book), adding many additional details as well as enhancing/upgrading existing ones.  I will also replace quite a bit of the supplied materials (e.g. Basswood and Walnut strips, Mast and Spar dowels, many deck furniture pieces, and most of the rigging lines/ropes, dead eyes, blocks, etc).  I will note these changes/additions as I move through each stage of the build.

 

Some might call this a "Kit Bash"....so call it what you will.... :) 

 

 

 

A few details about this model:

 

Model: Artesania Latina HMS Bounty (AL22810)

Scale: 1:48

Length: 36.5 inches

Height: 27.75 inches

 

I included a token picture of the box and the contents. 

 

After a few hours of reading the instructions and checking inventory all the parts appear to be included (although I didn't pay much attention to the wood strips,dowels and rigging material as they will be replaced).  The quality of the materials and parts looks good to me (with a few minor exceptions) but what do I know.  And the laser cuts on the pre-cut parts look very clean and seem to fit nicely on a dry fit (e.g. keel, frames and ply decks).

                                                           

                                                            post-17392-0-30858000-1426716081_thumb.jpg

 

                                                           

 

Pre-construction activity:

 

I believe in a solid foundation no matter what you’re building so I put together a build board first thing (as recommended in many build logs).

 

I took a piece of laminated shelving I had and fastened three clamps made from ply to hold the keel tightly in place along with a couple of “L” brackets to hold either end of the keel.  I’ll use weights and machinist blocks as I go along to support the keel and frames. 

 

I measured center on every frame and then checked each side to see if the height and width matched up.  Unfortunately, several measurements were off by a half to 1 millimeter on a few frames.  As such, I’ll definitely need to do some filing and shimming when the time comes.    

 

I also did a dry fit on the decks and they appear to fit quite nicely.

 

When dry assembling the keel and frames most of the joints were tight with the exception of a few which needed to be snugged up.  To get the frames nice and snug I used .5mm x 6mm shim pieces (.5 or less thickness x height of the notch on both sides to keep the frames centered).  

 

 

 

post-17392-0-58894700-1426716603_thumb.jpg

 

Build stand

 

 

post-17392-0-54918300-1426716709_thumb.jpg

 

Dry fit of frames and keel after I stained all the pieces (ended up using a Natural Walnut stain) 

 

 

post-17392-0-72161700-1426716866_thumb.jpg

 

Additional parts for the keel and frames were also stained

Edited by thomaslambo

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Next I assemble the keel and frames, and install the lower cross beam supports.

 

First, I included a few pictures of the instruction narratives, picture book and one of the part spec sheets so people can get a feel for what one has to work with when building this model (most instructions are fairly clear but a few seem to have lost something in the translation). 

 

However, between the above directions, the plan sheets, and closely reviewing a couple other AL Bounty build logs I’v been able to navigate the waters so far  :)

 

I glued in the fore and aft most frames (4 and 39) and their lower cross beams first to be able to use the middle deck as a template to check the alignment of the remaining frames (note; I also clamped a few middle level cross beam supports in to help further support the middle deck as I aligned and glued each of the frames). 

 

After I completed gluing frames 4 and 39 I installed the bow stiffeners and the stern fittings/stabilizers as it made sense to get that out of the way at this point.

 

Then I installed the fore, main and mizzen mast supports on the keel.

 

I then installed the rest of the bow and stern frames 5 – 10 and 33 – 38 on the keel using the same square and leveling technique used on the first two frames.

 

Lastly, I installed all the cross beam supports for the lower bow deck and the forward hold platform (bottom decks).

 

 

 

post-17392-0-97918400-1426801664_thumb.jpg

Here is a sample of a narrative, a picture from the book, and a spec part sheet.

 

 

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Rear view of the aft most frame being glued in.

 

 

post-17392-0-18734400-1426802179_thumb.jpg

Side view of the aft most frame being glued in (combination of machinist blocks, a square and a level to align each frame).

 

 

post-17392-0-37156000-1426802944_thumb.jpg

Close up of the stern stiffeners 

 

 

post-17392-0-42492400-1426802452_thumb.jpg

Overhead view of the completed frame and keel with aft and bow stiffeners and stabilizers 

 

 

post-17392-0-75077800-1426802292_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-17392-0-89808300-1426802321_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

Stay tuned for planking the lower decks..... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Welcome aboard Thomas.  

 

I think you'll be glad you started the log, as I get not only assistance and tips in my logs, but also encouragement and motivation to progress from the community here.

 

It looks like you've got a nice start on this one, and I'll look forward to watching your progress, even if I don't have any particular tips as someone new to this hobby myself.

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Hi Brian,

 

Thanks for stopping in.  

 

I agree, having read over 100 build logs by now, I've come to realize that no matter how expert you become, there's always room for improvement.  

 

It takes extra effort to maintain a log but I think it's well worth the effort.

 

I'll be getting into the more creative areas soon.

 

ttyl,

 

Boyd

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Very nice Thomas, you definitely have a great display of precision and an eye for detail. It's good that you decided to do a build log, information documentation is a real asset in this forum, for the builder and spectators. Great start!

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Hi Matt,

 

Thanks for stopping in, and the kind words. I couldn't agree more about information being a great asset here.  Reading many logs made me comfortable both to build the Bounty and to start a build log. 

 

I notice you're building the Bounty Launch, at some point I plan to build it myself.

 

ttyl,

 

Boyd

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Great start, Thomas. I will be following your log with interest. Just a note - the plywood laminations can still be seen after staining with walnut. On my build, I decided to leave it alone - to my eternal regret. If I were to do it again, I would cover up the plywood with something else. 

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Great start, Thomas. I will be following your log with interest. Just a note - the plywood laminations can still be seen after staining with walnut. On my build, I decided to leave it alone - to my eternal regret. If I were to do it again, I would cover up the plywood with something else. 

Keith,

 

I read all your comments as well as Danny's and several others on Capt. Al's log, and paid close attention to that recommendation (I ordered .5 mm x 6mm walnut planks to veneer the ply edges).  I'm also going to veneer all the lower and middle deck edges as well.

 

Your model is a fine example for me to follow, and I appreciate you following the log as I have many questions and some ideas I'd really like your input on.

 

I'll be posting my lower deck planking tomorrow.

 

Thanks much for joining in and I look forward to your input.

 

Boyd

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Next up, the lower deck planking and installation.

 

I planked all four of the bottom deck halves at the same time as I was on a roll and wanted to get that stage finished.

 

First I stained both sides of the false decks and then I painted the top side black to simulate tar (I looked at several methods of simulating tar and choose this one because I think it looks fairly good and it’s clean and easy to do).

 

I used a two-step shift of butts pattern for the lower decks.

 

I marked lines between the frames on the deck and proceeded to lay each plank row individually over the black painted surface.  After I glued each row of planks in place I carefully spaced the planks with the edge of the X-acto triangle square (.5mm gap), also using it to remove any excess glue that crept into the gap after I pressed the planks down.  Note; I used a small paint brush to apply the glue so I had complete control over the amount of glue on the plank.

 

After I completed each half and it had dried for a period of time I laid the deck (plank side down) on a piece of wax paper and placed a weight on top and let it sit overnight.

 

Then I laid each deck (plank side down) on a cutting mat and used X-acto knifes (with brand new blades) to carefully cut away the excess planking.

 

At that point I went on to simulating nail holes. I debated about dowels but felt that would be overkill for the lower decks and went with the pencil/sharpie technique.

 

However, I’ll definitely plan to use bamboo/wood dowels on the main deck and hull planking (really not a big fan of using the brass nails supplied with the kit for the hull planking).

 

The last bit of work on the decks was to put a couple coats of clear matte polyurethane finish on the decks.

 

Then I installed/glued the four half deck pieces onto the cross beams (Bow and Stern).

 

 

post-17392-0-02555400-1426969252_thumb.jpg

Thought it would be nice to show a pic of the tools used for the planking 

 

post-17392-0-46461700-1426969317_thumb.jpg

My plank cutting device and also the right side of the deck planked and the color of the stain on the bottom side of the decks

 

post-17392-0-86143500-1426969755_thumb.jpg

Initial planking complete on the right side of the Bow deck (note the X-acto square used for spacing)

 

post-17392-0-29804400-1426969850_thumb.jpg

Both Bow and Stern lower decks are now complete along with simulated nail holes

 

post-17392-0-00286000-1426970194_thumb.jpg

Bow lower deck installed

 

 

Stay tuned for the installation of the middle deck cross beam supports…...

 

 

 

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Install the middle deck cross beam supports.

 

Normally I wouldn’t have spent much time discussing this step because it’s quite straight forward (cut the beam to length and glue it into the frame).

 

However, as I cut and glued in the cross beam supports it really brought my attention to how flexible (probably flimsy is a better word) the frames are on this model.

 

When you think about it; most of the model ships use a POB design which is quite strong in comparison to this POF model (which is due to the open hull design).  The AL Bounty only has 15 frames and three decks (2 of which are partial decks that don’t meet all the frame sides).  As a comparison, the real Bounty had close to 90 frames according to The Anatomy diagrams.

 

Now I realize this model will never see the ocean and heavy seas, but none the less I think a little extra effort can help shore things up a bit.

 

As such, I’m going to add pins to the joints by drilling pilot holes at a slight angle from the top of the beam into each frame and insert wood dowels coated with glue for good measures.

 

This should tighten things up a bit and help keep everything in tact during the fairing/planking/sanding process. It shouldn't take more than a couple hours to complete this step.   

 

I’ll install the dowels just before I lay the middle decks as I need to work without several of the cross beams in place while I install my lower deck modifications (i.e. 6 cabin additions in the lower Bow and Stern decks – I’ll describe this activity in a future post).

 

And the last item was to install the remaining stern supports.

 

 

post-17392-0-73848300-1427300336_thumb.jpg

Bow cross beam supports glued in

 

 

post-17392-0-88530400-1427300367_thumb.jpg

Also note the four clamps on the bow (gluing in the under deck cross beam) 

 

 

post-17392-0-74294000-1427303209_thumb.jpg

Finished cross beams on the stern

 

 

post-17392-0-93614700-1427300391_thumb.jpg

Stern supports glued in

 

 

And in case you're wondering; I didn't realize I'd need to remove some of the cross beams to complete the cabin additions until I started fitting the templates and cabin facades onto the lower decks (the reason why I had to hold off on installing the pins in the beam/frame joints). 

 

 

 

Stay tuned for the “hold well” installation…..

Edited by thomaslambo

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One other item I've been playing around with are the door knobs (if that's what you call them).

 

I don't much like anything brass on the ship, and the AL kit comes with two brass pieces that make up the suggested door knobs.

 

Take a look at the picture below and let me know what you think (note; in both pics the end ring has been slightly reduced in diameter to try and make it closer to scale).

 

The door on the left is the stock brass color that most people used on their AL Bounty model.

 

The door on the right has the same brass pieces that I blackened.

 

I'm not sure about what kind of hardware was used on the Bounty (or any 18th century ship) and what color it was.

 

Any opinions on the two I show in the picture would be appreciated (which color do you think looks best)?

 

 

Thanks

 

Boyd

 

 

post-17392-0-42501700-1427320318_thumb.jpg 

Edited by thomaslambo

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John and Captain Steve,

 

Thanks much for your input...I'm definitely leaning toward the blackened approach and I'll spend some time improving the process I use (the pic was a quick and dirty use of a marker pen just for comparison).

 

I'm following both of your current builds and would humbly appreciate any help and advise :cheers:  

 

Boyd   

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Very nice start to your model. I will follow with great interest. I haven't viewed this kit before. I am guessing that it is made with exposed planking?

It looks very good.

Mike

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Very nice start to your model. I will follow with great interest. I haven't viewed this kit before. I am guessing that it is made with exposed planking?

It looks very good.

Mike

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John and Captain Steve,

 

Thanks much for your input...I'm definitely leaning toward the blackened approach and I'll spend some time improving the process I use (the pic was a quick and dirty use of a marker pen just for comparison).

 

I'm following both of your current builds and would humbly appreciate any help and advise :cheers:  

 

Boyd   

 

You seem to be doing a fine job so far, Boyd.

 

As to blackening metals, I do prefer the look of chemically-coloured over painted. There are a number of products available ... as well as a number of threads on the topic here on MSW.

 

So far, my favourite is Casey's Brass Black.  

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Very nice start to your model. I will follow with great interest. I haven't viewed this kit before. I am guessing that it is made with exposed planking?

It looks very good.

Mike

 

Hi Mike,

 

Thanks for the kind words and coming aboard to check out my build log.

 

And yes, you're correct as the starboard side of the AL Bounty is open for display purposes and adds a level of complexity to the build.  There are a couple of other build logs on this ship, as well as some fine pictures of this model in the gallery. 

 

Boyd

Edited by thomaslambo

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You seem to be doing a fine job so far, Boyd.

 

As to blackening metals, I do prefer the look of chemically-coloured over painted. There are a number of products available ... as well as a number of threads on the topic here on MSW.

 

So far, my favourite is Casey's Brass Black.  

 

 

CaptainSteve,

 

Thanks for your vote of confidence, and the suggestion.

 

I definitely plan to try my hand at using chemicals to blacken the door knobs and several other parts (cannons, among others).

 

I must have read a 100 build threads by now and I can't even put to words how valuable that exercise was (I considered it a home work assignment) to prepare myself for my first build.

 

As such, I came across a really nice thread called "THE BLAKEN-IT TRIALS" here is the link that I'm sure you've already seen:  http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/6977-the-blacken-it-trials/#entry205420

 

And yes sir, a bottle of Casey's is in the shipyard :)  

 

Boyd

Edited by thomaslambo

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... must have read a 100 build threads by now and I can't even put to words how valuable that exercise was (I considered it a home work assignment) to prepare myself for my first build.

 

As such, I came across a really nice thread called "THE BLAKEN-IT TRIALS" here is the link that I'm sure you've already seen:  http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/6977-the-blacken-it-trials/#entry205420

 

And yes sir, a bottle of Casey's is in the shipyard :)  

 

Boyd

 

Arr ... Verily, I have read that same number o' builds, my ownself !!

 

The secret with using chemical-blackening agents seems to be in the preparation of the surface before blackening.

Essentially, all oils, dirt, dust, grease and grime needs to be removed a-forehand. Also, it can help to scratch-up highly polished surfaces e'er so slightly. 

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Hi Boyd,

You've made an impressive start and doing a great job on your model.  I've pulled up a deck chair near the beer 'fridge and will be watching your progress with lots of interest. 

 

Cheers Mate,

 

Rowan D.

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Hi Rowan,

 

Thanks for the kind words....and coming aboard to check out my build log.

 

Your comment about AL "errors and omissions" is consistent with my experience so far.  One thing I would recommend with anyone building this model is read ahead thoroughly as some of the steps need to be considered ahead of time (true for any build I suppose).

 

However, overall I would definitely build another AL kit with no hesitation.  In fact, my next build will be the Cutty Sark and more than likely I'll build the AL version.  

 

Cheers back Mate,

 

Boyd

Edited by thomaslambo

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Now I moved on to building and installing the “hold well”.

 

First; I think it’s interesting that much of the AL HMS Bounty model is quite accurate and one example is the hold well.  You can see it in the design diagram from The Anatomy book I included in the first pic.  Also, take note of the stern and bow cabins on the lower decks (in my next post I’ll detail the addition of six cabins in the diagram…a bit of scratch building).

 

I paneled five of the six hold well panel sides per instructions (the backside of the middle panel is out of view), as well as the hold well box pieces that end up mounting on the right side panel.

 

Note the 1mm cut/gap on the inside of each panel of the hold well to allow the panels to fit snugly with the center panel (similar to a tongue and grove joint).

 

I also installed veneer end pieces to cover up the ply edges that are in view on both of the side panels and hold well box lid (edged the ends with some left over planking pieces).

 

One last change was to use simulated nail holes on the planked panels instead of the brass nails included in the kit (I just didn’t care for the look of the brass nail heads included in the kit).   

 

I also blackened both of the brass pieces provided in the kit for the door knobs and well box handle.  In addition, I shortened the diameter of the brass loops to try and make them closer to scale.

 

I then installed all three finished panels as well as the hold well box in the following order:

 

1  On the work bench; I glued the left side panel to the middle panel making sure it was perfectly squared up.

 

2  Did a careful dry fit of all three panels in the ship to be sure the fit was good (not much adjustment needed – so far the laser cuts have been very accurate).

 

3  Then I installed the left and middle panels to the keel and frames with the left panel butted up against the stern deck and the middle cross beam on frame 35. Making sure I aligned the position as to allow the right side panel to fit cleanly.

 

4   I glued the hold well box to the outside of the right panel and then glued it in the ship to complete the hold well install (note; the right panel is set at a slight angle from top to bottom by design – you can see it in The Anatomy diagram).

 

5   After taking all the pics and downsizing them, I noticed I had left off the hold box lid handle (same parts as the door knobs).  This was a quick and easy fix due to easy access to the hold box.

 

Note; in the last two pics you’ll see part of the stern cabin addition in place for fitting purposes.  You can see the lower deck stern cabins in the diagram below.  I’ll detail the lower deck cabin additions in the next post.

 

 

post-17392-0-02457000-1427741333_thumb.jpg

Diagram from The Anatomy - note the hold well at an angle (no 50 & 51 near the main mast) and stern and bow lower deck cabins

 

post-17392-0-97920400-1427741452_thumb.jpg

Hold well sides have been paneled and simulated nail holes added 

 

post-17392-0-84040500-1427741479_thumb.jpg

Hold well box paneled

 

post-17392-0-21484100-1427741510_thumb.jpg

 

post-17392-0-73460800-1427741554_thumb.jpg

Note the trim to cover the ply edge

 

post-17392-0-47700100-1427741595_thumb.jpg

 

post-17392-0-21324600-1427741870_thumb.jpg

Glue up the left and middle panels on the bench 

 

post-17392-0-05787700-1427742087_thumb.jpg

Hold well installed.  Note both edges of the side panels have been veneered to cover the ply edge.

 

post-17392-0-25166600-1427742119_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-17392-0-52619600-1427742172_thumb.jpg

Note the dry fit of stern cabin facade. Also, see the notches cut for the bilge pipes in frame 34's cross beam.    

 

post-17392-0-91584900-1427742201_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

Stay tuned for lower deck cabin additions (a bit of scratch building)…..

Edited by thomaslambo

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On to the lower deck cabin additions…. not included in the instructions.

 

As a reminder for people that may not be familiar with this particular version of the Bounty; the model leaves the starboard side of the ship open for viewing.

 

So, this is when I did some simple scratch work to design and install some additional cabins in the lower stern and bow areas.  My ideas came from some of The Anatomy drawings (see the Bounty diagram images below) as well as pictures of other AL Bounty builds.  It took some time but I think it was well worth the effort. 

 

As I was designing the additions I wondered why AL didn’t expand on the interior details of the model as there is quite a bit of open space for making creative additions.  Perhaps they left the opportunity open for the builder to take their own poetic license  :)

 

Also, one other added benefit to adding cabins on both lower decks is you can fill the space behind them with filler blocks between the frames to aid in the very difficult hull planking process (particularly in the Bow and Stern areas).  The filler blocks will be hidden by the cabin walls :)   

 

Steps I took to design, build and install the cabins:

 

I first cut out templates for the wood façades and bulkheads/side walls (Bow and Stern) and carefully fit them to the space including cutouts for the overhead cross beams.

 

Then I spent some time laying out the design and look of the cabin facades.

 

Once I was happy with the templates and design style I cut out the wood parts using some birch panels I had left over from a previous RC airplane build.

 

Then I paneled the front side of each façade with the same planking used for the decks.  And then added the door frames, door handles and floor moulding.

 

On the stern cabins I left the middle cabin open for viewing some furniture I plan to put in the room.  The inside of each side wall was also paneled with planking.

 

Then I did one last fit to be sure everything was tight, squared everything up with angle blocks and glued in all the parts (facades and side walls).

 

Note; I used 1/4 x 1/4 inch supports across the back side of the facades that should insure they stay in place securely.  

 

 

post-17392-0-34428600-1428073755_thumb.jpg

Bounty lower decks

 

post-17392-0-19736300-1428073786_thumb.jpg

Bounty side profile

 

 

post-17392-0-06342300-1428073823_thumb.jpg

Template laid over birch ply - decided to extend the wall a bit

 

 

post-17392-0-67616200-1428074043_thumb.jpg

Bow wood facade being fitted

 

post-17392-0-34802100-1428074076_thumb.jpg

Stern wood facade being fitted

 

 

 

post-17392-0-49711800-1428074166_thumb.jpg

Another fitting in the stern prior to adding door handles and install

 

post-17392-0-40402100-1428074197_thumb.jpg

Another fitting in the bow prior to adding door handles and install

 

post-17392-0-79776300-1428074341_thumb.jpg

Gluing up the bow facade using angle blocks to keep it level 

 

 

post-17392-0-08873800-1428074450_thumb.jpg

Installed cabins in stern (just need to add the furniture pieces) 

 

 

post-17392-0-60498900-1428074376_thumb.jpg

 

post-17392-0-75241100-1428074563_thumb.jpg

 

post-17392-0-03800200-1428074613_thumb.jpg

Note the side walls in the stern middle cabin - inside walls have been planked like the cabin front

 

post-17392-0-97747800-1428074638_thumb.jpg

 

 

At this point I'm going to add the pins/dowels to each of the frame/beam joints for extra strength.

 

And then I'll check the alignment again of the main, middle and lower decks with the fore, main and mizzen masts, as well as bilge pipes and all the stanchions that drop below the main deck.....then on to installing the middle deck.

 

 

Stay tuned......

Edited by thomaslambo

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congrats Boyd,

 

Looks like a fine kit you have Chosen, from what is to be seen so far. Also a nice idea to stain the Framework before Assembling, its a nice contrast to the light colored deck, and the interior Fitting out, great looking.....

 

Nils

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Outstanding work !!

 

Hi CaptainSteve,

 

Thanks for stopping in and I appreciate the vote of confidence.....as I noted on your build log I'll be needing some of your help when I get to the finer details on this build.

 

While I'm at it, have you ever soaked sails in Tea to give them a more used/aged look....this is what AL is suggesting in the build instructions?

 

Boyd  

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congrats Boyd,

 

Looks like a fine kit you have Chosen, from what is to be seen so far. Also a nice idea to stain the Framework before Assembling, its a nice contrast to the light colored deck, and the interior Fitting out, great looking.....

 

Nils

 

Hi Nils,

 

Thanks for coming aboard....and I really appreciate the kind words on the build.  

 

As you know, this is my first build so I can use all the moral support I can get.  

 

I just checked out your scratch build, wow really nice and love the detail work on the inside (another open hull build).....I may borrow a few of your ideas :)    

 

Boyd 

Edited by thomaslambo

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Hi CaptainSteve,

 

While I'm at it, have you ever soaked sails in Tea to give them a more used/aged look....this is what AL is suggesting in the build instructions?

 

Boyd

 

Yep. I first tried using tea to stain the furled-up sails for the ship-boats on my USS Constitution build. In this case, the results were fine, but bear in mind that very little of the sail is visible.

 

When it came time to consider the sails on my Launch, I found the results to be too even ... which would be perfectly fine, if that is the look you are aiming to achieve. No doubt you'd be aware I was going for a more weather-beaten look.

 

One word of caution, don't leave the sail-piece soaking for too long. I found a long-forgotten sample which had been soaking (by then) for approximately three weeks ... there was almost nothing left of the cloth. Anywhere between six to 96 hours should be fine.

 

Finally, I highly recommend running a few tests yourself to see what you think of the results. A test piece need be no bigger than 1" square. 

Edited by CaptainSteve

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CaptainSteve,

 

Thanks much for the information and suggestions.

 

I plan to get some more sail material to place in the hold of the Bounty.  I'll get enough so I can do some testing....and at some point I'll post the results.

 

Boyd

Edited by thomaslambo

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