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GaryKap

BENJAMIN W. LATHAM by GaryKap - Model Shipways - scale 1:48

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Just found your build. You're doing a fine job. Looks like you have a lot of help.  That's good.

 

Bob

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The Latham is a nice looking model.  I applaud the way you are working on her. 

David B

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Gary,

 

Your schooner looks very sharp. I like that white waterline stripe. And the transom looks good to me. I personally think you can still pursue this as Benjamin Latham. And I think it would make a very fine Ben Latham.

 

I look forward to seeing you next update.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

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Progress Report:  It's been a while since I posted, so here is an update.  I have finished planking the deck, added the main rail, monkey rail, and monkey log.  I did not attempt to do the scuppers or rail mouldings.  Because I have decided to model a generic Grand Banks fishing schooner, I did not add the seine roller nor did I include the propeller assembly or exhaust pipe.  I have assembled the hatches, forward companionway, trunk cabin, and wheel box but have not glued them down.  They are just sitting on the deck.  I have mostly assembled the windlass bit support mechanism and the samson post.  The bitts and fife rails are primed and sitting in mounting holes but are not finished yet. The chain plates have been installed.   As you can see from the photos, the ship is mounted on an oak board with 1/8” brass rods.  Thanks to Rafine for his helpful suggestion on this.

Here are some thoughts on the quality of the kit for anyone looking at this log and considering whether to select Benjamin W. Latham as their next ship model project.  At this stage of my construction, I would recommend it; especially for someone looking to gain experience before going on to something more difficult and complex. 

For the most part, the kit is well designed.  Providing the center keel as a four part “sandwich” helps insure a strong straight hull.  The two thickness of construction gives you a center line that helps when cuting the rabbet – a much easier job than with “Fair American”.  The transom was the one tricky part, but it worked out OK. The plans are straightforward, and the planking layout included in the plans is a great help.  There are no difficult bends, so the planking is relatively easy.  I used a sharp plane to taper the width of the planks, and could run a single plank from stem to stern in most instances.  The kit is very generous in the quantity of material supplied.  Same for the 1/16” x 1/16” strips for the deck.  The cast metal parts supplied with the model are excellent; better than most “kit bashers” could create.  The only down side so far is the forty foot seine boat that I was unable to complete  (see earlier entries in this log).  The kit makes an impressively large ship model and will appear even more so with masts and rigging. 

Here are some pictures:

 

 

 

 

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Excellent model!  Your workmanship looks impressive and the hull lines are nice and clean.

Your result will be a beautiful.

Cheers.

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As is she looks so good you could put in stub masts and call it finished.  But sails would be better.

 

Bob

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Gary

 

That is one fine looking model. You have a very clean crisp execution on the ship. The colors you've chosen complement each other well - both the painted and natural wood surfaces. Very very nice.

 

Cheers

 

Elia

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Gary I just visited your build and what a beautiful model she is, very graceful lines and your workmanship shows them off very well.

 

michael

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Hi Gary

 

Supper job you are doing on your Benjamin W Latham, very nice work and I can appreciate all of the very fine detail that you are adding to your build. Looking at your ship it almost makes me want to to start building another schooner as they are such a joy to work on,                                                ENJOY.

 

Regards   Lawrence

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Thanks to everyone for your kind words, support, and encouragement.  And for the "likes".

 

I have completed most, but not all of the standing rigging.  Here are some pictures to show progress.  Again, the instructions accompanying this model are very good, but the information provided by Chapelle (The American Fishing Schooners 1825 - 1935) REALLY is helpful.  Chapelle gives dimensions for SO many things - the turnbuckles, the crosstrees, etc that a modeler needs to know to make things in correct proportion (not that I always did...).

 

These build logs are intended in part to give help to future modelers.  Two pieces of advice.  First, for splicing line, get large needles called "yarn darners" (ask the Admiral).  These come in a packet with a variety of sizes with eyes that will accept most rigging diameters.    Second, to make turnbuckles at 1/48 scale, use the 1/16" square wooden strips.  Drill a hole longitudinally through a piece 3/8" long.  Make an eye is steel wire, run the wire through the wood, and make an second eye.  Smooth the ends of the wood to the shape of a turnbuckle, paint it grey to look like galvanized steel, and put a black stripe down opposite sides to create the appearance of the open center.  

 

 

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Edited by GaryKap

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Hi Gary

 

Very nice work on your fishing schooner, just love all of your detail, Your turn buckles look great and seaming very easy to build, thanks for the tip,                                                        ENJOY.

 

Regards   Lawrence

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Hello Lawrence, Ken, and Bob -

 

Thank you for your kind words.

 

The standing and most of the running rigging are done.  I still need to add some finishing touches like rope coils.  I need to decide how I want to stow the anchors.  Those that were supplied with the kit are the large "bank" anchors.  According to Chapelle, these were taken apart and stowed on deck forward of the windlass.  The stock was lashed alongside the anchor, which was secured with flukes aft.  Anchors were sometimes lashed to the windlass bits, outboard of bitts, on the warping head.  The smaller iron anchors used in harbors (not supplied) were usually stowed on the rail abaft of the anchor davits.

 

Here are some pictures:

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Beautiful work Gary. The Benjamin w. is a nice looking craft. I have it on the shelf here in the workshop. Currently building The Scottish Maid but very much looking forward to opening the Benjamin W. box. Retirement is a wonderful time ,I feel sorry for people who don't have hobbies,every dy I wake with new dreams to conquer. Well done once again.....Jim Cleland

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Hi Jim -

Thank you for your kind words.  I have not been active on this web site in a few months.  My wife and I have moved into a "patio home" - a compact two bedroom unit that is one of four on a concrete slab.  My work space has been reduced to a 2 foot by 3 foot work table in the second bedroom.  Because of the need to downsize, I had to give this model of Benjamin W. Latham - and others - away for want of space. 

 

But I am still managing to work on my "Confederacy" with its three foot hull.  The work table does OK and I can take the hull outside for sanding.  This model has a LOT of fine detail work that should keep me occupied for several months.  And that is the real enjoyment of this hobby of ours.  On the other hand, I have absolutely no idea where I will display the finished model.  I am considering donating it to our local library to be auctioned off and provide funding for books and supplies.

 

In the days to come I will post to my Confederacy build log and provide a progress report and some pictures.

 

<<Gary>>

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