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archjofo

La Créole 1827 by archjofo - Scale 1/48 - French corvette

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12 hours ago, vossiewulf said:

That line has been SERVED with a 140mph ace to the backhand side :) Beautiful work. 

@vossiewulf

 

Hello,
of course you are right.
Looks really not special.
I noticed only after your notice.
Will pay attention in the future ... 😡

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2 hours ago, shipmodel said:

Hi Johann - 

 

Beautiful work on the servings and turning in the thimbles in the pendants.  Are you going to tar (blacken) them or leave them the tan color?

 

One suggestion, if I may - I found that when I seized the head of the pendants and shrouds too closely to the masthead, the total bulk of the seizings of all of the shrouds would not go through the lubber's hole in the tops.  I had to redo them so the seizing was below the top so I had some flexibility.  I do not know if this problem will arise for you, but you should be aware of it early.

 

Best of success on the project.  I will continue to follow along with interest.

 

Dan 

 

@shipmodel

 

Hello Dan,

thank you for the interest.

I will leave the pendants like this.
Your note, I will consider when it comes time.
Thanks for that.

Edited by archjofo

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1 hour ago, archjofo said:

@vossiewulf

 

Hello,
of course you are right.
Looks really not special.
I noticed only after your notice.
Will pay attention in the future ... 😡

 

Johann,

You misinterpreted or mistranslated his comment. He was referring to a Tennis shot. Your work is superb.

 

 

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@albert
Hello,
Thank you for the interest and the nice comment.
Thank you also for all the LIKES.
 
Here is a little update:
The gun tackles consist of a single and a double block. The length amounts to the original 234 mm and 4.875 mm in the scale 1:48.
DSC07334.thumb.jpg.e6b3a753bcfcde086b69767cb47e4b28.jpg

 

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beautiful work johann, and  thank you for showing your work , i learned a lott

 

After reading you work, i have still a question.

 

After you used birchwood for making the brass parts black, do you use a glue (like CA) for attaching them definitly into the wood.

 

 

regards Luc

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On 2/24/2019 at 9:15 PM, vossiewulf said:

I will use less slang this time to say the guns look great. What is the finish on the guns themselves? 

Again sorry, for the misunderstanding on my part.
Thank you for your recognition.
For the final finish of the guns, I have to give me some thoughts.

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On 2/24/2019 at 10:19 PM, Dowmer said:

Johann, the tackle looks wonderful. How did you make the hooks?  They look very scale with the thicker hook body and pointed turned tip.

 

 

@Dowmer

 

Thanks for the nice comment.

The hooks I've done so:
 

IMG_7749.thumb.jpg.de8d93b249e8740536b6ba1cc52e559c.jpg

I hope the picture show that.

Edited by archjofo

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22 hours ago, luc said:

beautiful work johann, and  thank you for showing your work , i learned a lott

 

After reading you work, i have still a question.

 

After you used birchwood for making the brass parts black, do you use a glue (like CA) for attaching them definitly into the wood.

 

 

regards Luc

@luc

Hi Luc,

I would also like to thank you for the compliment.

Yes, I use instant glue (cyanoacrylate).

 

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On 4/16/2018 at 7:59 PM, archjofo said:

 

Hello friends of model making,
thanks for the interest, especially thanks to Carl for
the last nice comment.
At the moment my job takes me a lot.
Therefore, there is little time for the hobby.

In that respect, I can only show a little.
The iron fittings of the blocks for the backstays

f358t643p142976n2_PAUplXsh.thumb.jpg.a3f1edd8b312902dfbf9f39229bda52a.jpg
Other fittings are for the double blocks for the boat davits.

f358t643p142976n5_KAakNPDV.thumb.jpg.d245d7d5092eb40814ea28d62b2f7eda.jpg
These blocks are equipped with hooks.
For this my first attempt. This is not optimal yet.

IMG_1520.thumb.jpg.cb05c8c03325ebe852cf146ec3931dd2.jpg

IMG_1528.thumb.jpg.14ab5ce26d74eb23c6673caaa7e0b2b1.jpg

 

Johann,

another question where did you commissioned the etched parts. (I am from Belgium)

 

regards Luc

 

 

 


 

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On 11/12/2017 at 10:34 AM, archjofo said:

 

The last details on the masts are made.
These are hoops around the lower masts with holders for pins,
so-called spider bands.
The holder was made of brass investment casting.

IMG_1112.thumb.jpg.76f5422cf1af3e864b03dd924752f9d5.jpg

 

 

 

and a last question : brass casting, how do you do that?? I never seen this before. Do you have a tutorial ???

 

Edited by luc

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@luc
Hi Luc,
sorry, only today I come to answer your questions:
The etched parts I have made here:
LINK
But I have previously drawn an etching template.

Unfortunately I do not have a tutorial.

First of all, I made four original brass parts for the brass castings. I sent these prototypes to a jewelery foundry, which then made molds and then casts.
I hope that I have explained it understandably.
I am happy to answer further questions.

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On ‎2‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 9:12 AM, rwiederrich said:

I wonder where the marine historians and architects went wrong when rebuilding the constitution? 

Nylon lanyards.

 

One of my pet peeves are the sailing ships used in so many period movies which are rigged with white Dacron line. I understand that modern synthetic cordage is far better in actual use than the old natural fiber cordage that would be historically correct, but in an otherwise meticulously accurately dressed set, white Dacron is a real "poke in the eye." It took a long time for the sailcloth manufacturers to get around to offering natural canvas-colored Dacron sailcloth with a softer hand and I think properly colored synthetic line may now be available. The "traditional look" Dacron sailcloth looks far better on traditional boats.

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On 2/26/2019 at 12:29 PM, luc said:

and a last question : brass casting, how do you do that??

As Johann said, you let a professional do it :) Any decent sized town will have a jeweler that does custom work. The easiest thing to do is get jeweler's wax and carve/build up a master, they can then make a mold and do the casting. It shouldn't cost too much. I've had parts made that way for projects, and I also made some rings for an ex-admiral.

Edited by vossiewulf

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Hi Johann I look forward to your work that I consider one of the best I've ever seen and I greatly appreciate your explanations on the various methods you used to make the various pieces that make up the wonderful model you are making, good continuation and thanks.

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9 hours ago, vossiewulf said:

As Johann said, you let a professional do it :) Any decent sized town will have a jeweler that does custom work. The easiest thing to do is get jeweler's wax and carve/build up a master, they can then make a mold and do the casting. It shouldn't cost too much. I've had parts made that way for projects, and I also made some rings for an ex-admiral.

@vossiewulf

Hello,
completely correct.

The first picture shows a master model. Overall, I have made four of them. This will reduce the mold cost.

The length of this part is 2.8 mm, without pin.

IMG_1059.JPG.0865687c6106c1e45c5806b55687f44d.JPG
In relation to the individual production, it is not too expensive.
Nine castes each 4 parts (36 parts) cost including shipping 36 €.

cast_lacreole.jpg.965f0a34ff2a90b7a5bb3f5d458e49f6.jpg

Here is a LINK to a German jewelry foundry, just for example. I think there will be this in every country.

Edited by archjofo

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1 hour ago, albert said:

Hi Johann I look forward to your work that I consider one of the best I've ever seen and I greatly appreciate your explanations on the various methods you used to make the various pieces that make up the wonderful model you are making, good continuation and thanks.

@albert

Hello Albert,
I am particularly pleased about your statement, because it comes from an outstanding modeler.
I hope I always explain it reasonably understandable, as I do not speak English very well.

Edited by archjofo

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Hello,
It still needs to be clarified how the gun tackles are stowed. There are two ways to do this:

version 1

DSC07513.thumb.jpg.d308cdf8c045b9cf291f84a1df54a073.jpg
 

version 2
DSC07510.thumb.jpg.c2d933e638b4c4daa36e92002c353a27.jpg
The version 2 I consider the more authentic version. It also corresponds to the Paris model LINK and the illustrations from the book "Aide mémoire d 'artillerie navale 1850" LINK.

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