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archjofo

La Créole 1827 by archjofo - Scale 1/48 - French corvette

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Albert, thank you for your interest and your kind comment.
Many thanks also to all for the LIKES.

 

As a supplement to the last report here are a few pictures for making and assembling the aprons of lead for the gunlocks of the 18 pounders.

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Hello,

Meanwhile, I have tried the final rigging of the 18 pounders La Crèole.
To see how long the running part of the gun tackle has to be, I have chosen the first layout.
The second arrangement is then the one used on the model.

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To my sailor's eye, it looks like your sample gun has the gun tackle hook and the breaching rope eye reversed.  Now, that may well have been French practice, and is what it is.

 

What does keep catching my eye for the stowed gun is that there's no real way to stopper the gun tackle.   Which will be sore wanted the first time the ship rolls.  One just does not want a couple tonnes of canon wandering away from  its gun port.  Especially if tables are slung in between the guns and the deck space is wanted for seating..

 

It's just a seamanship quibble.

 

Everything else in the examples simply makes me green with envy for the skill and talent represented there.

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Posted (edited)

Hello,
thank you for the interest and the LIKES.


This is how the gun looks full rigged on the model ship.
It's pretty tricky to install the cannon on the deck.

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I replace the unsightly ropes in the hammock cranes with new, darker ones. I bought the previous ropes.
But now I can make the ropes myself with my ropewalk.

 

Edited by archjofo

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Hello,

thank you for the interest!

Just wanted to see what the 18-pounders of La Créole look like in the style of a historic postcard.
In this context, a small note: The four 18-pounders, which were set up as part of the original equipment on the La Créole in 1829,
were actually a bit dated at this time. This type of cannon was based on a system from 1786.
Later, in 1837, these 18-pounders were replaced by 30 pounders of the Paixhans system.

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Johann, I thoroughly enjoy every one of your photographs and the beautiful craftsmanship that you put into your work.  You set a high standard, which I never hope to meet - but I certainly will keep trying - thanks to your inspiration!

Jim 

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I was watching a British-made television documentary about the development of naval ships last night. ("Heavy Metal" it was called.) They were interviewing the curator of Victory aboard the vessel right next to a gun and carriage. The gun had a hammered lead cover on the flint lock, exactly as do yours! I expect you may know that, but I was very impressed with your eye for detail. If it weren't for this thread, I'd still be wondering what that "lead patch" was on top of the gun. :D

 

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21 hours ago, BETAQDAVE said:

    Put a charge of black powder and one of those canon balls in it, and see if it fires off a round!  It looks like it would work to me. 

Hi Dave,

I'm pretty sure it works … :D        :pirate41:

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Johann, it seems like with the gunport lids having a hole in them that this corvette always stowed its guns outboard like that, instead of inboard with the gun muzzle against the bulkheads? When did they start doing that? Also, it seems to me if you're stowing the guns that way, you're putting a lot of faith in the tampions that they won't allow any water in with the muzzle exposed to rain and spray.

 

And the whole thing is extremely perfect. The gundeck would definitely pass the captain's inspection.

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A lot of French ships of that time did have half-lid gun-ports and stowed their guns that way on the upper deck. Below is an image of the BELLE POULE (1834) in the Musée de la Marine in Paris that shows the same arrangement (sorry for the pixelated image, but the lighting for conservation reasons was a bit dim):

 

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And indeed, the model of the CRÉOLE in the same museum has this arrangement. It is not Johann's invention.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, vossiewulf said:

Johann, it seems like with the gunport lids having a hole in them that this corvette always stowed its guns outboard like that, instead of inboard with the gun muzzle against the bulkheads? When did they start doing that? Also, it seems to me if you're stowing the guns that way, you're putting a lot of faith in the tampions that they won't allow any water in with the muzzle exposed to rain and spray.

 

And the whole thing is extremely perfect. The gundeck would definitely pass the captain's inspection.

@vossiewulf

Hi,

Wefalck has already answered your question correctly.

Thanks to Eberhard (Wefalk) for the good explanation.

 

 

Edited by archjofo

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