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archjofo

La Créole 1827 by archjofo - Scale 1/48 - French corvette

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Posted (edited)

Hello dear friends,

in the meantime I was able to find out in a publication " Takelung und Ankerkunde - Freiherr von Sterneck -1873 " that pushing the rungs through the rope ladder ropes represents the correct execution.

Freiherr_von_Sterneck_Auzug_Bildband.JPG.9224c55a658ba43afdab37d7601c65d6.JPGQuelle: Takelung und Ankerkunde - Freiherr von Sterneck -1873 - Bildband


However, there must be a clear passage at the shrouds.

This is not the case with the Paris model.

3559-001-web.jpg.f2b807528e9d82ebf86f7e5d8518c8dc.jpgLaCreole_Monographie_Auszug.JPG.845ddbff2bde53a904e41f6dfe345701.JPG
Now that the details have been clarified, I can start with the implementation for the model.

Edited by archjofo

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Hello, 

after a little longer research, I will now show you how I make the rope ladders for my model.

DSC09604.thumb.jpg.f758b325c35395e4cdaf2437edddbbc5.jpg
DSC09608.thumb.jpg.7edc3e401cff4d9bf6252af057c64d2f.jpg
Before I install these rope ladders on the model, I do a test on my model section, as can be seen in the following pictures.

DSC09625.thumb.jpg.8ce493ae3000056740b4f1d8d4490f4e.jpg

DSC09614.thumb.jpg.99c56f6bc1da1d1e606f66521130df50.jpg

 

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Johnn, in your close up picture I see that you are using a sleeve type tool to push the rope over the the end of the stave. How are you opening up the rope before sliding it over? Thanks.

The results are really superb.

Michael 

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Posted (edited)

Hello, Michael,

first of all thank you for your interest and the positive comment.
I open the rope with the same tool, a kind of 
hollow spike. I made that from a cannula and usually use it for splicing LINK.
DSC09646.thumb.jpg.e74c02d8d67b50abf9a340643f48515d.jpg

Edited by archjofo

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Beautiful work Johann.  I've been following along on your progress and find your attention to every detail inspirational.  The wrap of every rope and the precise and elegant shape of every piece of hardware is so exacting and perfectly to scale.  And thank you for taking the time to show us how you do it.  Bravo!

 

Gary

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Masterful work as always Johann. 

Perhaps this has been answered before but I can’t find it in the volumes of pages, but what do you use for glue and once finished with an area, what to you use to treat the wood for a final finish (Tung oil, polycrylic etc).

 

Thanks

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Posted (edited)

I've been following this build quietly,  and now seeing this rope ladder I've got to say amazing!! Your attention to detail is incredible, you have a very fine vessel. 

Thankyou for sharing 😊

Edited by Edwardkenway
Missing word

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30 minutes ago, Dowmer said:

Masterful work as always Johann. 

Perhaps this has been answered before but I can’t find it in the volumes of pages, but what do you use for glue and once finished with an area, what to you use to treat the wood for a final finish (Tung oil, polycrylic etc).

 

Thanks

@Dowmer

Thanks for the nice comment.
The surface treatment of the wood I use this
Product: LINK
In Germany it is called "Ballenmattierung" because is applied it with a lint-free Cloth.

 

When using glue, the material always matters.
For wood, I usually use white glue (German product: Ponal) and for gluing eyebolts, for example, I use cyanoacrylate.

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Hello dear friends,

I would like to thank you for your interest and support, which I appreciate very much. 
For the suggestions and assistance I find in your building reports here in form I thank you.


Here is a short update of my report:

DSC09663.thumb.jpg.5eb5a9850e95f6b3784fbc0b2da720ed.jpg

Edited by archjofo

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Hello Micheal,

hello Mark,

thanks for your kind comments. Also thanks to all for the LIKES.

 

The equipment of the fore shrouds with the ropes ladders on the model has been completed in the meantime. The final fixing of the carrier ropes to the shrouds will be done when the ratlines are attached. In this respect, adjustments are still possible, if necessary.  

 

It continues with an update:

 

DSC09675.thumb.jpg.6059c5f56298d46ce5d6ef82ea9901af.jpgDSC09670.thumb.jpg.33b133f3e6c4a5ddf03e585863f51d5e.jpg

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Hello dear friends,

meanwhile the ropes ladders are also attached to the main mast shrouds.

DSC09716.thumb.jpg.8242188e2189d14416ed6a165d72b8d4.jpg

On this picture you can see one of the tiny eyebolts made of brass wire (diameter 0.4 mm), which are necessary for fixing in the waterway.

DSC09720.thumb.jpg.e028270756709607389151c7adcaf4e6.jpg

DSC09677.jpg

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Indeed sublime attention to detail.

 

These rope ladders became common, when the man-high bulwarks and solid boxes for the hammocks were introduced. Otherwise it would have been very difficult to climb into the shrouds. We have contemporary pictorial evidence from various countries.

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Hello Friends,

 

since about 6 months the shrouds are set, but I have not yet lashed the lanyards. So I think the shrouds had enough time to stretch, because I have retightened the taljereeps from time to time.
Before I can attach the ratlines, I have to tighten the shrouds properly and secure the lanyards. In this respect it has to be clarified how to secure the taljereep correctly after the shroud rope has been set. There were different methods for this. However, in many beautiful ship models this detail is often not correctly reproduced and thus impairs the overall impression.
A common method is to secure the taljereep as shown in the following drawing: 

 

1879415559_1579547631038-a8f981fa-0b1b-4fec-a983-39e8ecbbb325(002).thumb.jpg.0f891bad5f5faef8aa4edab65100ed17.jpg

Source: Rigging Period Ship Models, Lennarth Petersson


However, a close look at illustrations of contemporary French ship models at the beginning of the 19th century, including Le Rivoli and La Créole (see detail), reveals that the lanyards was inserted from behind between the deadeye and the shroud and wrapped around the shroud twice in the direction of the bow and once in the direction of the stern. What was done with the end of the taljereep cannot be seen on any of the pictures available to me.

 

7a077c7dac8fb6a2f546743a250d632f.jpg.22ed7a8c50468833ad6da896c858331d.jpg

Source: Rigging Period Ship Models, Lennarth Petersson


However, a close look at illustrations of contemporary French ship models at the beginning of the 19th century, including Le Rivoli and La Créole (see detail), reveals that the lanyards was inserted from behind between the deadeye and the shroud and wrapped around the shroud twice in the direction of the bow and once in the direction of the stern. What was done with the end of the taljereep cannot be seen on any of the pictures available to me.

 

LaCreole_Taljereep_Musee_de_la_Marine_Paris.thumb.JPG.2e5bd575d277abe6e8b31dd01c5ed6e6.JPG 
Source: Musée de la Marine Paris - La Crèole

 

After a long search in relevant literature I came across the following picture. This is a more modern way of rigging, but the same principle. The figure Fig. 318 b shows the back of the deadeyes and one can clearly see that the free end of the lanyard was connected to itself by bindings. So I think it is not far off to conclude that the French could have secured the lanyards in this way at the beginning of the 19th century. This could also explain the execution of the Parisian and other contemporary models.
 
Source: Seamanship, S. B. Luce, 1891

 

At my model stand, with which I have carried out experiments on the ratlines so far, I compared the well-known and the method for securing the taljereeps mentioned above (unfortunately one turn too many).

DSC09813.thumb.jpg.7b06a9768e65f21995d929554d8525b2.jpg
 
Before I decide on an execution method, I would be grateful for your expert opinions.
See you soon ...

 

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Hi,

to my question of the lanyards for the dead eyes as described in the last post I found another picture.
This shows the lanyards of Le Rivoli from 1807. Here is also
to see this method of securing the lanyards.

Is there really no one who can give me more information about this?

LeRivoli_1807.jpg.3396d197950c6c25bd8f8058805bc4e7.jpg

Excuse me, but I don't have a higher-resolution image. I hope you can see it.

 

Edited by archjofo

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Johann,

Based on your research, I think you have found your answer. Plate 56 above and the pictures of the contemporary model seem to show it pretty clearly that the "lanyard" reeves or is threaded through like in your experiments and lashed onto itself like you did on your example to the left. You have both published evidence and contemporary model proof for your time period.

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Hello,
I'm glad you're still interested in my report.
Thank you very much for that.

The last guide blocks were attached to the inside of the bulwark in the waterway.  
In total I have now made 43 blocks (single, double and triple blocks).
In addition a picture of the front area of the battery deck:

DSC09829.thumb.jpg.6cab109c01e473aa3dc5915b1f03cb64.jpg

Now in the next step I can attach the ratelines as soon as I have a decision to secure the lanyards.

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@Captain Poison
Thank you for your interest and the nice comment.

Thanks to all the others for the LIKES.

 

Hello,

in the last report the caps for the elavation thread are still missing on the carronades.
As you can see below, I make them from brass.

DSC09833.thumb.jpg.1e867350bd2dba7d75af76ba2f5450f5.jpg

DSC09838.thumb.jpg.664589cb4eb0bd3324ba952af5296b4f.jpg

Edited by archjofo

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