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La Créole 1827 by archjofo - Scale 1/48 - French corvette


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  • 2 weeks later...

After finishing the futtock shrouds for the main mast I need some motivational work in between. 
Therefore I prepare the fixing of the anchors, which were stowed away in front of the channels of the main mast.

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But the wooden anchor stocks made many years ago no longer meet my expectations.

DSC00557_wett.jpg.b6b9cb395745f592a83e04f1a140f211.jpg


Therefore, they have been rebuilt as in the original. The hoops are made of brass sheet 0.3 mm, no longer of black paper.

DSC00559_wett.jpg.19fc94cf9190fd63e39950cda2edfc56.jpg

 

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The anchor ring had to be equipped with puddening and seizing. I decided to use the Petrejus version, which can be seen on many contemporary models of the Musee de la Marine.

Petrejus_Brigg_Irene.jpg.69bdd233761574448142c345f4df894b.jpg

Source: E.W. Petrejus „Das Modell der Brigg Irene“                 

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Source: Manuel Du Gabier, 1866

 

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DSC00563_wett.jpg.7602ae8fd8a687f081948dd6f838a6f1.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

@Ainars Apalais

@Jorge Diaz O

Hello,
thanks a lot for the nice words and all the others for the many LIKES

After a short break I am about to put the smaller anchors with the iron stocks on the anchor bearings. 
The larger one was used as a reserve anchor; the smaller one was used as a throwing anchor or warp anchor. Contrary to the drawing by J. Boudriot I decided to place these anchors according to the Paris model. So these anchors are placed on the port side.
DSC07675.thumb.jpg.8c4479e95dd1236ef57478eaf28d987b.jpg 


Soon we will probably continue with the ratlines at foremast and cross mast.
To be continued ...

 

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@giampieroricci

That's really a very nice compliment. 
Thank you for it.
I also admire your wonderful models.

 

It is always a pleasure to see that there is still interest in my report because of the many LIKES.

I am pleased.


After a little excursion to the anchors i continue with the shrouds for the mizzen mast. 
So in the first step the lower shrouds were aligned.
Afterwards I start with securing the lanyards. 

DSC07685.thumb.jpg.c91f558a4bb9fb8cb153b76e54bbfb21.jpg

 

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9 hours ago, archjofo said:

@giampieroricci

That's really a very nice compliment. 
Thank you for it.
I also admire your wonderful models.

 

It is always a pleasure to see that there is still interest in my report because of the many LIKES.

I am pleased.


After a little excursion to the anchors i continue with the shrouds for the mizzen mast. 
So in the first step the lower shrouds were aligned.
Afterwards I start with securing the lanyards. 

DSC07685.thumb.jpg.c91f558a4bb9fb8cb153b76e54bbfb21.jpg

 

fantastic :) 

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12 hours ago, archjofo said:

@giampieroricci

That's really a very nice compliment. 
Thank you for it.
I also admire your wonderful models.

 

It is always a pleasure to see that there is still interest in my report because of the many LIKES.

I am pleased.


After a little excursion to the anchors i continue with the shrouds for the mizzen mast. 
So in the first step the lower shrouds were aligned.
Afterwards I start with securing the lanyards. 

DSC07685.thumb.jpg.c91f558a4bb9fb8cb153b76e54bbfb21.jpg

 

you know Johann every time I see photo's of her I am overwhelmed by your skill and just can not wait till I see your next set of photo's. You set a very high bar. Gary

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Hello,

@Vladimir_Wairoa

 

@JpR62

 

@garyshipwright

 

thanks a lot for your compliments and all the others for the many LIKES.

 

Before the lanyards can be secured, the mizzen stay must be brought into position.
For this I made a rope for lashing the mizzen stay with my own rope making machine. DSC07689.thumb.jpg.1e6ab221813d3d82d5199222bc120e69.jpg

 

DSC07692.thumb.jpg.970314aa0d1211264f3f9514cc379cfd.jpg

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2 hours ago, archjofo said:

Hello,

@Vladimir_Wairoa

 

@JpR62

 

@garyshipwright

 

thanks a lot for your compliments and all the others for the many LIKES.

 

Before the lanyards can be secured, the mizzen stay must be brought into position.
For this I made a rope for lashing the mizzen stay with my own rope making machine. DSC07689.thumb.jpg.1e6ab221813d3d82d5199222bc120e69.jpg

 

DSC07692.thumb.jpg.970314aa0d1211264f3f9514cc379cfd.jpg

Looks like a render! Very crisp.. 

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Very handsome looking rope!

When staining a rope made on a ropewalk, which way is better, first stain the thread and than twist a rope from it, or stain a twisted rope after making it?
Also, what stain/colour brand do you recommend for this purpose?
I recently located and ordered a big spool of old antique Irish linen #35 thread by Barbour and currently am awaiting its arrival. I want to try making a rope from this (I was told) superior matherial, but unfortunately it only comes in white.

Previously I used to use factory coloured cotton from DMC for my ropes  - black and ECRU (and even various polyesther brands), so I didn't have a problem with staining my ropes.

I wonder how much difference I will encounter with this linen thread?

 

Regards,

 

Thomas

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@Dziadeczek

Hello, Thomas,

thank you in advance for your compliments on the rope.
I have also made many ropes from linen yarn.
Colouring was still an issue then.
The colouring experiments with wood stain were really promising.
Therefore I would take wood stain from the company CLOU for example.

 

See the picture below.

 

DSC06714.thumb.jpg.a40f3a8ade59588ad415516e23c95f4a.jpg

 

By the way, Irish linen yarn from Barbour is said to be one of the best. 


In the end I decided to use silk yarn, which I make my ropes for the corvette. I'm very pleased with it.

The results are quite impressive, aren't they?

DSC06872.thumb.jpg.eedbbf2e9cf65ef962ae87c4236f0f79.jpg
The silk yarns are available in many colors. Therefore, there is no need to colour he ropes. 

 

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Moques de conduits
At the moment I'm still securing the taljereeps for the cross shrouds, so that I can continue with the installation of the ratlines afterwards.
In the meantime, I am doing some interesting research on a detail that I have only seen in this form on La Créole so far. This is a kind of guiding block called "Moques de conduits". For the first time I noticed these blocks, which are attached to the inside of the shrouds, on pictures of the Paris model. Up to now little noticed, but now I have to deal with them.
 LaCreole_Leitkauschen_sw.thumb.jpg.943576b69c2ac2ee668df176384755a0.jpg 
Source: Musée de la Marine Paris - La Crèole   

 

In the Atlas du Génie Maritime on plate no. 212 (blocks and other rigging accessories) I could find exactly the kind of shroud blocks shown on the pictures of the Paris model, as shown on the next drawing on the right. To the left of it I have also added a block with 3 discs.                            

 

Moque_de_conduits_LaCreole_wett.JPG.5e11afab098d14e17309adc32f9fb20d.JPG  
Source: Atlas du Génie Maritime on plate no. 212


According to the drawing, these blocks have the following dimensions in 1:48 scale:
1 - slice b= 2,4 mm to t=2,8 mm
2 - slice w= 3.2 mm to t=2.9 mm
3 - sliced b= 4.3 mm to t=3.0 mm,
and each 1.8 mm thick.
From the illustration in the atlas I was able to find out the French name for this kind of blocks. Unfortunately I was not able to find out the exact name of this block. 
Some time ago I described the production of guide blocks, which were placed inside in the area of the waterway. On the next picture from the monograph you can see very well that these guide blocks are in connection with the moques de conduits attached to the shrouds. 

 

LaCreole_Musee_de_la_Marine_Paris._wettJPG.jpg.ffdd6ee40937583aaf79c1cbc68d2267.jpg 
Source: Musée de la Marine Paris - La Crèole   


According to this, it can be assumed that a total of 28 of these "signpost blocks" (conceivable designation) are to be produced, depending on the one with 1, 2 or 3 discs.
I would be very happy if I could find out more about this kind of blocks. Maybe one of you has some information about this.
 
See you soon ...


Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

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Johann, I think I have heard of these blocks referred to as fairleads in English.  There were many various kinds to guide the ropes higher in the rigging down to the deck so they didn’t foul.  There are some descriptions here on MSW.  

 

Sorry, I don’t have any more information. 

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