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10th-11th century Byzantine dromon by Louie da fly - 1:50 - FINISHED!


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What I've done to get rid of fluff in unwaxed line is make a very quick pass over an open flame. 

 

It's works fine but it's probably not worth the adrenaline rush! As you say photos always tend to highlight such things that are really negligible up close like thread fluff and wood grain. 

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I'm working on putting the anchors in place. Here's a test placement (disregard the way I've tied the rope that fishes the anchor - it's just to keep it in place for the time being).

 

20201009_120147.thumb.jpg.cb611af3538dfaf2ee5d2dc4fb410f67.jpg

 

I'm not sure what I need to do with the anchors and windlass - are the anchor cables supposed to be attached to the windlass when the ship is sailing, or is that only for when she's raising the anchors? And if the cable isn't attached to the windlass when under way, what should it be attached to? Should it be tied to (say) the peribolos (pseudo-cathead) and then coiled on the deck? Or what?

 

I suspect this isn't the way anchors were dealt with in later ships and that may introduce uncertainty, but any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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6 minutes ago, Louie da fly said:

I'm working on putting the anchors in place. Here's a test placement (disregard the way I've tied the rope that fishes the anchor - it's just to keep it in place for the time being).

 

20201009_120147.thumb.jpg.cb611af3538dfaf2ee5d2dc4fb410f67.jpg

 

I'm not sure what I need to do with the anchors and windlass - are the anchor cables supposed to be attached to the windlass when the ship is sailing, or is that only for when she's raising the anchors? And if the cable isn't attached to the windlass when under way, what should it be attached to? Should it be tied to (say) the peribolos (pseudo-cathead) and then coiled on the deck? Or what?

 

I suspect this isn't the way anchors were dealt with in later ships and that may introduce uncertainty, but any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Looking good, Louie!!!  Could we please see an overall picture of the entire model?

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I'm thinking the anchor rope would be removed from the anchor and then stowed somewhere just to keep it from being underfoot.  As I recall reading somewhere.... the anchors weren't all that heavy and so a windlass might not have been needed for that.   Windless only used for raising masts then.

 

Which makes me wonder, if the same line for the anchor was also used to raise and lower the masts. 

 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, DARIVS ARCHITECTVS said:

Could we please see an overall picture of the entire model?

 

Apart from the awning over the poop deck and the steering oars, everything's pretty much done except for the fiddly stuff.

 

  20201009_175542.thumb.jpg.34addfeb293dcc408e46ca520030ee32.jpg  20201009_175638.thumb.jpg.f51b154dbee6626434f8ae12592ea6b3.jpg

 

Mark, the anchors ranged from 47 to 67 kg (103 - 147 pounds). Probably two or three people could haul one up without a windlass, but this isn't something I'm qualified to comment on. Any ideas on whether this is too heavy to be hauled up by hand and would have needed a windlass instead?

 

But yes, it could certainly be used to raise and lower the masts as well.   

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Dislodging the anchor could be done by "sailing (or rowing!) it out". Yes, maybe the windlass wasn't really needed . . . But it does look good, and I think I will wind one anchor cable around it, if only for the look of the thing.

 

And I'm sure there'd be plenty of other jobs on board ship that could need the windlass's help (such as Mark's suggestion of using it to raise the masts). 

 

8 hours ago, DARIVS ARCHITECTVS said:

Louie, your ship model looks SPECTACULAR!

 

Thanks very much. And thanks everybody for all the likes -they are much appreciated. It's getting to the point where I can actually see the end in sight. Still quite a bit to be done, but there's definitely a light at the end of the tunnel (I hope it's not an approaching train!)

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While I'm thinking about the anchors, I'm also working on the side-rudders (steering oars if you prefer) .

 

I'd originally intended to attach the rudders to the lower through-beam on each side, but I realised it wouldn't be able to pivot upwards if I did, so I used the upper beam instead. So I had to cut a hole in the planking on top of the support structure,  for the rope that fixes the rudder to the beam.

 

20201011_124641.thumb.jpg.3398076bb20ee9c9928251f6fd632993.jpg

 

The rope allows the rudder to pivot around its vertical axis (for steering), and with a bit of luck it will also allow it to swing upwards out of the way when only one rudder is in use. The kind of lashing or whatever that was used is (of course) unknown, so I'm going with the theoretical one from the TAMU paper "The Development of the Rudder, 100-1600 A.D.: A Technological Tale"  by Lawrence V. Mott ( https://nautarch.tamu.edu/academic/alum.htm) to see if it works.

 

I drilled a hole in each rudder and inserted a brass pin.

 

20201011_124812.thumb.jpg.3219b9f766281676a5b488745bc1ce4f.jpg

 

and a corresponding hole in the upper beam on each side of the ship

 

20201011_124558.thumb.jpg.68b7ba802865d3162fdf3c0b872e4de3.jpg

 

Here are the rudders dry fitted

 

 

20201011_130110.thumb.jpg.6ecc699a43588097bd9cf8eb2a847f90.jpg        20201011_130205.thumb.jpg.ea0678fe03c73b9f7d0ca0712001010d.jpg

 

 

There is only one Byzantine picture that shows a tiller on a side rudder:

 

image.png.f9d3dc6917991452c73f857db7880420.png

 

I'm probably going to copy that for my own. To get the tillers at the right height I put the steersman in place next to one rudder and marked where the hole for the tiller would have to be.

 

20201011_125225.thumb.jpg.8155f45fd9d9c5d06a6c7b589514e1fb.jpg      20201011_125238.thumb.jpg.7b8e215247390646ec1a7917313e7b22.jpg  

 

20201011_125334.thumb.jpg.6e336ab97b21b629141d8ac7f3057ff1.jpg

 

Note that I haven't yet finished the steersman's arms - I'm holding off till the tillers are in place. I wasn't sure if I wanted one tiller to be swung up out of the way, but I think it'll look better with them both in operation. Which means I have to carve another steersman. 

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What's wrong with these photos?

 

20201011_205442.thumb.jpg.7e9283045f4ea0de05b8fce546307c7a.jpg                    20201011_205601.thumb.jpg.e75ca3d402d21c3840b3681bcf566a0c.jpg

 

For those who answered "the anchor cable is at the wrong angle to the windlass" go to the top of the class. And there's no way I can move the windlass to change the angle - there's no room. Looks like I won't be using the windlass for the anchors after all (sigh). Oh, well -the crew will just have to rely on brute force to raise the anchors.

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I thought of that, Phil. Unfortunately there's nowhere to put one without it getting in the way.

 

Druxey, that was terrible (but in a good way) :rolleyes:. Yes, whatever else, if I install a windlass in a future build I'll have a better idea of how it all works in relation to everything else. I have to say I'm learning a lot. They reckon that the best way to avoid Oldtimer's disease is to create lots of new neural pathways by doing and learning new things. At this rate, I'll never get it.

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Thanks, Wolf. That's very flattering (blush) :blush:

 

Okay, I bit the bullet and installed the anchors and cables without involving the windlass - they're catted and fished, and the cables vanish under the forecastle as though they're coiled there.

 

20201012_160533.thumb.jpg.97de693a9327989c8634c16132c8ab3a.jpg     20201012_161408.thumb.jpg.61edbceeb543bfab2601a953ece5a11f.jpg  

 

20201012_161431.thumb.jpg.8f802a25daee56fa976820f2a9f0fd50.jpg      20201012_161447.thumb.jpg.a077f4a3ff8ea4b25b36d33d56047bb8.jpg  

 

20201012_161537.thumb.jpg.274b6a5c98387b4efbe6e1176bf2ab64.jpg      20201012_161545.thumb.jpg.16f1666caf3544062383e14cd78d20fd.jpg

 

I'm not sure if I should cut the free end of the anchor cable a little shorter. It looks like it might be a little long.

 

And I did something I've been wanting to do for a long time, and which I wasn't willing to do until I was near the end in case I broke it while working on other things - I've finally added the chain that supports the ramming spur at the bow.

 

I attached the chain to one of the eyebolts I'd prepared earlier.

 

20201012_162024.thumb.jpg.2be22608df0c54c9d9d6c8f3038dda88.jpg   

 

20201012_162110.thumb.jpg.96002591f0e6379c396683be4dc1f315.jpg

 

Then made an "iron" (actually thin aluminium from a catfood container) strap to go around the spur. And drilled a hole in the front face of the forecastle, inserted the eyebolt and added a dab of CA glue to keep it in place.

 

20201012_205140.thumb.jpg.730cafbf7919d580ea467281883ad914.jpg        20201012_205839.thumb.jpg.d3a59ca8eb258ebde55ed633ed43844d.jpg   

 

I cut the chain to length and added another ringbolt on the other end. Then put the strap on the spur and glued it on with CA, and drilled a hole in the top for the second ringbolt.

 

 

20201012_210845.thumb.jpg.7fd482eaa4791ef957771aa841b35ad5.jpg       20201012_211513.thumb.jpg.e8be7ef4d65a3237a20c4d8cc994c5d0.jpg

 

And inserted the ringbolt and glued it in place.

 

20201012_211756.thumb.jpg.2f0fa55a6f75084abb96520ff59cece8.jpg   

 

 

20201012_211846.thumb.jpg.d752d7c6c85c9d4c569a943ae8a02579.jpg   

 

VOILA!

 

And I've started making the tillers, using the "poor man's lathe"

 

20201012_214132.thumb.jpg.9a1a303267b984f880d35c5739f291c1.jpg

 

That's all till next time.

 

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I've made and installed the tillers for the side rudders (steering oars) and put the rudders in place.

 

20201013_095116.thumb.jpg.8003328b717b86e000227c82d990cd1d.jpg

 

  20201013_095908.thumb.jpg.6be4b2c34d33696f512e7b51e5c99c62.jpg      20201013_141345.thumb.jpg.3153de4e6dc4ddb771fd7613a7dbb4a0.jpg  

 

I discovered I'd slightly miscalculated the position and angle of the holes for the brass pins mentioned above. The tillers were too high and instead of facing directly across the ship they were angled a little aft. So I drilled new holes in the rudder shafts - fortunately the old holes are hidden by the shafts themselves when the rudders are in place.

 

I have yet to add the rope lashings that supposedly hold the rudders in place, finish the steersman I've already made (he's just standing there loose fitted at the moment), and carve another steersman for the other rudder.

 

I've been tidying up the free ends of the rigging (the bosun will be pleased) - adding coils to the ends of the loose ropes, particularly for the after yard where the tacks and vangs aren't yet ready to be pulled tight (and shortening the ropes - so the coils take the place of the bit I've cut off). That way they're not all over the decks.

 

20201011_124558.thumb.jpg.4ce8c6ab4eaa59a0ecfd13016b75afb0.jpg

 

I'm still thinking about the free end of the halyard tackle the crewmen are pulling on to haul up the yard. By rights, there should be a lot of it - if you take into account all the rope that runs between the blocks of the tackle. But I'm thinking of cheating and just cutting it shorter - otherwise it's just going to mess up the deck.

 

And I forgot earlier to post the fact that I've added ladders to access the side castles. I had to put them at the after end of the castles so they didn't get in the way of the oarsmen getting to their benches - they can just get in through the side of the castle, (except the  man right in line with the ladder, who can get to his own bench by climbing over the back of it).

 

20201008_114927.thumb.jpg.4df29a3023e5c0d40eea8aaf14291eab.jpg

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Steven,

 

I just saw your progress report elsewhere on the forum.  Wonderful!

 

I was just studying Lateen rigged vessels in drawings by The French painter J.J. Baugean for a project that I have been contemplating for many years.   Baugean drew his drawings in the late 1700’s, early 1800’s and still shows guys crawling up the yards to furl the sails.

 

Roger

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Thanks for the likes, everyone. and for the flattering comments.

 

2 hours ago, cog said:

couldn't a block and tackle have been used on the anchor in combination with the windlass?

 

Possibly - were you thinking of supporting it from the lateen yard? Without something to support the block I can't see how you'd do it that way when the mast and yard have been lowered. Or were you suggesting that the block's tackle should be belayed to something lower down, such as the pavesade (railing to support the shields)? I'm a total duffer when it comes to this sort of thing - always have been. For me, learning how rigging works is like driving nails (blunt ones) into my brain.

 

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I would suggest something lower like th e pavesade you mention. You actually only need a fixed point around which the cable can be directed in a (more or less) straight line to you windgirl.

 

I stopped driving blunt nails into my brain when I found out I didn't have one

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And on to the lashings for the side rudders. The diagrams of lashings in the TAMU paper I mentioned on the previous page weren't much help, so I worked up something of my own. Remembering back to my days as a Sea Scout at the age of 14 I remembered a lashing we'd used. But first I had to re-teach myself how to do a clove hitch, something I hadn't tried for 57 years, and even back then I'm not sure I really mastered it. Took me two or three goes with the instructions in front of me, then maybe half a dozen tries without. And I think now I can do a clove hitch from here on in - something I think is going to be very useful in future models involving ratlines(!). The clove hitch starts the lashing:

 

20201014_110040.thumb.jpg.8c092715839f1c6dc4443e28eedb4d31.jpg

 

Then round and round:

 

20201014_111325.thumb.jpg.f63bb7eb711beb0d435ccb2c584e5819.jpg      20201014_120753.thumb.jpg.334c73e5fc0bf2e96dcab0249e7b960d.jpg

 

20201014_120812.thumb.jpg.83de242947b67ee37015a9a989bd3dfc.jpg       20201014_093425.thumb.jpg.21f8a547211a05fae20d0555fe39bdeb.jpg

 

  20201014_120738.thumb.jpg.55b5f652bc6456d8d61198be4338a2e5.jpg

 

This is a sort of universal joint made from rope. It allows the rudder shaft to pivot  left and right for steering under the influence of the tiller, just as in a stern rudder. And it can also swing upwards around the beam so the rudder lifts out of the water - either when only one rudder is in use, or to enable the dromon to be pulled up onto the beach stern-first.

 

Then for the lower lashing - this one is made of lighter rope. According to the TAMU paper on the previous page of this log, if the rudder hits a submerged obstruction, instead of the rudder shaft being shattered the rope will break allowing the rudder to swing up out of the way. Before beaching the ship this lower lashing is untied.  

 

  20201014_133228.thumb.jpg.f57772cca8bf009e6f96f1d21390f29a.jpg     

 

 

   20201014_165233.thumb.jpg.6ed5b80807ca61ead472275e7b37893e.jpg   

 

That's all for now . . .



 

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  • ccoyle changed the title to 10th-11th century Byzantine dromon by Louie da fly - 1:50 - FINISHED!

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