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10th-11th century Byzantine dromon by Louie da fly - 1:50 - FINISHED!


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Thanks everybody.

 

The last thing I'll be doing is to make a case - I'm off to buy perspex today.

 

A final comment - If I were to build the model again there are quite a few things I'd change. For a start I'd make it about 2 metres longer (full scale) - the poop deck needed to be considerably bigger than I'd made it in my drawings if it was to take the awning and the steersmen, and I had to sacrifice an oarbench on each side to fit it in. I'd also start the curve of the "tail" further forward so it was higher - the poop deck had to be lowered so it didn't overlap the sides of the ship.

 

And I would have made the forecastle higher - according to the sources much of the Greek Fire apparatus should have been underneath the foredeck, not on top. The pump would still have to be on the deck, but the oil tank and brazier should have been below. At the time I was worried that the parapet would get in the way of the lateen yard, but I believe I could have had a higher parapet and still not had a problem.

 

I'd also have been a lot more careful about the placement of the benches - they weren't spaced as equally as they should have been. I do know the benches on the Yenikapi galleys weren't exactly spaced, but the differences were pretty minor. As it was, the spacing between the tholes and the benches was different for every oarsman - another reason I couldn't mass-produce them.

 

And I'd have a double-sheaved calcet (integral block) at the top of each mast, not single, as I've since found large numbers of near-contemporary calcets - all of them double sheaved.

 

However, having said that, I'm very pleased with the model as it turned out. Certainly it could have been improved, but I think it's pretty darned good.

Edited by Louie da fly
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@Louie da fly Steven, it a master piece! Congrats. She is a beauty and an excellent model, am going to download a few pictures for my archives and I shall also send them to Prof. Maritime archeolol. Demesticha of the Cyprus Univ.  She is teaching byz. sea archeol.

 

Great work sir!

 

Christos

Edited by MESSIS
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I'm working on making the case for the dromon. A plywood body,

 

20201106_131755.thumb.jpg.6312463d0a329211d27da072ecbbb864.jpg

 

with the "glass" made of polycarbonate.

 

Front view

 

20201106_132319.thumb.jpg.baec413b316e015808cb6d0c7d9a8148.jpg

 

Back view (from "inside")

 

20201106_132419.thumb.jpg.5b06c3b408b0eb5d802800472116bfe1.jpg

 

The polycarbonate is a separate structure which will be screwed to the body once the model is inside.

 

 

20201106_132202.thumb.jpg.cb59f2f62b3800dd9cf88ccab7b65bc4.jpg

 

I used "metal" screws because of their fine threads. Because the polycarbonate is so fragile I had to be very careful about making the holes - first I drilled small pilot holes through both body and polycarbonate - then larger ones - almost as wide as the outside of the screw threads. I rubbed each screw against a bar of soap (to provide lubrication), and slowly and carefully turned the screw, which acted as a die-cutter, making a female thread in the hole in the polycarbonate.

 

The guy who supplied and cut the polycarbonate to size showed me how to do the gluing between the pieces  - didn't reckon my inexperience, so there are a few places where the glue has interfered with the pure clarity of the surface. But not too bad for a first time.

 

I'll be staining the plywood so it doesn't just look like cheap pine. And I have some ideas for the background panel. But don't expect anything to happen for a while. I have other things that have to be done first.

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Museum quality model. The base you have chosen using the marble, adds to the actual historic time period is really a sharp idea. Love the color scheme also with all the individual men and shields blending in with the ship. Outstanding work, next years calendar show image for sure!

 

:imNotWorthy:

 

Congratulations!

 

:champagne-popping-smiley-emotic

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Christos,

 

The polycarbonate was 4.5mm thick (any thinner and the joints don't join), and the glue was supplied by the people I bought the polycarbonate from, so I don't know what it was. If you're looking to make a case the same way, the people who sell you the polycarbonate might be able to provide glue, or at least tell you what to get and where to get it.

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Thank you Steven. I had untill today made my display cases out of glass, its costly and the seller joins the glass by a sort of laser welding maschine. The problem is, its heavy to carry home from the shop and also fagile, I broke that of Hermione's the other day. 

 

I dont know where I can find polycarbonate to buy here in Limassol, may be Amazon does sell.

 

Anyway thank you very much for your help Steven.

 

Christos

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Just be aware that polycarbonate has disadvantages as well - the main one is that it scratches easily, and if you get glue on the surface where it's not supposed to be, the surface goes "cloudy".

 

But if you're careful enough (not like me!) this won't happen - but I found the glue sometimes spurts unexpectedly out of the nozzle of the tube of glue as you squeeze it. So take care!

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Bradley,

 

I've found polycarbonate very good. Nice and light, and rigid so long as you do your gluing properly. But be cautious with the gluing - I got spots of glue on the polycarbonate surface when I squeezed the air out of the (really thin!) nozzle as instructed, and drops of glue flew into the air and landed just where I didn't want them to. And once they're on the surface there's nothing you can do about it - trying to wipe the glue spots off just smears them and makes it worse. And if you squeeze too hard when applying the glue down the length of the joint it spreads out onto the surface instead of just staying within the join. I think it's mostly just a matter of practice, but forewarned is forearmed.

 

You run the glue along the inside of the join and surface tension "pulls" it into the space between the two surfaces. It's really quite cool to watch. It doesn't take long to dry solid, either. I found one joint came apart a bit and had to be re-done. But once everything's successfully glued together it's light, strong and self supporting. Pretty cool!

 

Making the first join is the hardest because you have to somehow hold everything together in exactly the right configuration while you're gluing. Once the first two panels are joined it becomes easier because they support the following panels.

 

 

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Steven, The proper adhesive for polycarbonate is, I believe, methylene chhloride. This a bit toxic and you have to hold the sheets in jigs and run the liquid along the seam with a needle and syringe. This will actually fuse the sheets together. Superglue will produce clouding at the join. I elected to put he polycarbonate in slotted wooden frames which means they can be replaced if scratched. This is the third large case I have done this way ( see my round ship build, last page). Also see this link:

https://www.cutplasticsheeting.co.uk/blog/uncategorized/how-to-glue-polycarbonate/

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Superglue won't hold Steven. You can take it apart again without to much force. Dick is right, you need a glue which fuses the polycarbonate. Not certain if MEK works, but there are a few glues which are specially used for this material

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There is a glue called Craftics Thickened Cement #33 that I have used for gluing small pieces of polycarbonate to styrene on my plastic model, and since it is not too thin, I think maybe one could mask the edges of the polycarbonate being joined to protect the surfaces from overflow and “spider web” strings from extruding glue, without the glue creeping under the tape.  The surfaces would probably need to be masked on the inside and the outside of the seams.  Here is a link:

 

https://www.craftics.net/ShowItems.aspx?Category=80&ParentCategory=3

 

Craftics makes thin glues too that can be used on polycarbonate.  I do not know if any of these are available outside of the United States, however.

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8 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

The glue I used was supplied by the people I bought the polycarbonate from, so presumably it's the right glue for the job. It's not superglue.

They are a bit reluctant to supply methylene chloride because of its toxicity so they usually sell other glues to the general public. That's my experience. BUt you can get it if you go to the bulk supplier in your town. They also have these cute squeezy bottles with a needle on it that lets you run the stuff into the join. Worth a try. A couple of boards  joined at an exact right angle  and positioned like a V will support the sheets while applying the liquid methylene chloride.

Dick

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