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Rustyj

Bomb Vessel Granado Cross Section by Rustyj - 1:24 - Finished

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Thanks Tim.

 

Hi Chris. I’ve played with it a bit. It is as thin as water. The best way I found to do it on

something this large is to use a cut up cotton tee shirt. Using rubber gloves of course I

dipped the tee shirt in the dye squeezed the excess out and then rubbed it in. At the ends

I did tape it off and used a small brush to better control it. I’m very happy with the way

it came out. After it dried I also installed three rows of planking below the wales. That

is the extent of hull planking I will do.

 

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Hi Rusty. Nice build sir and seems that other's have allready taken the good word's so I am taking my hat off to you sir. Good job. Gary

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It looks great Rusty and convinces me that the next opportunity that I have, I will try the dye. I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one using old tee shirts as applicators (It's what I use for Wipe-on Poly).

 

Bob

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 Sign me up as a member of the "old t-shirt club" too.  Very clean work Rusty - enjoying watching your updates.

 

Bob

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Thank you Gary. Your comments are always appreciated.

 

Hi Bob, yep old tee shirts have almost as many uses as duct tape.

 

Hi Bob H. I’m sure the tee shirt club is very large. One problem I have is that since

I’m semi retired I don’t wear them out as fast as I once did. I’m afraid someday I

may deplete my supply and have to use, gasp, new ones. :D 

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Hello Rusty.

I was looking around the house last week for some lint free cloth and could not find any anywhere.

Until I came across my wife's clean old underwear.

Thinking she won't miss one pair I cut it into little pieces that was ideal for applying stain.

Worked a treat :)

U won't tell will u ??

 

Antony.

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Rusty the work so far is superb, had to laugh at the T shirt stories. I have found that an old worn out cotton bed sheet works very well and is also lint free. One sheet provides a lot of 12 inch squares of rag. no dangers involved in procurement either.

 

Merry Christmas to you and family.

 

Michael

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Thanks for the tip Mike. Now I just have to “accidentally” tear a sheet so I can give it a try.

 

Had a good stretch of time in the work shop. I have been planking above the wale.

Very straight forward until I got to the sweep ports and gun port openings. Then I

had to notch the plank. It was a slow process of take a little off, check, take a little

more and recheck. After several times it worked out.

 

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Now its time to plank the starboard side and then a bunch of treenailing.

 

 

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Thank you all for stopping by and for all of the likes.

 

Hi Ben, Thanks. It’s really fun using multiple woods.

 

Hello Jakob. Thanks for joining this motley crew and your kind words. :) 

 

The starboard side is now complete.  Now it’s time to drill a lot of

holes and make some treenails.

 

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No work or playing in the shop for the next couple of days. :( 

 

I also want to wish a Merry Christmas to everyone and their families here at MSW! :cheers:

See you again soon!

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Thanks Grant. Although Santa’s fund had already be allocated, thus no lathe under the tree, he did leave

me a Crown Mini Turning Set of miniature lathe tools with 3-3/4-Inch 95mm H.S.S. blades and 6-Inch 152mm

rosewood handles with brass ferrules containing: 1/8-Inch 3mm Gouge, 1/4-Inch 6mm Gouge, 1/16-Inch

1.6mm Parting Tool, 1/4-Inch 6mm Skew Chisel and 1/4Inch 6mm Round Nose Scraper. :)

 

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These will make a nice start and could be used with a “drill press lathe” until I can whine enough to get a

lathe for my birthday! B) 

 

Well everything has been cleaned up, grandkids have all returned to their home, and now it's shoptime! :) 

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Nothing spectacular, just plugging along here. Holes drilled for treenails,

holes filled with boxwood treenails, everything sanded down to 400 grit

sandpaper and one coat of wipe on poly applied.

 

post-43-0-74415700-1428521654_thumb.jpg

 

Now I have to make the cap rail and start working on some of the cleats and gun carriages.

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Hi Jakob, Yes she is going to be a big one.

 

The sheer rail was cut from cherry as it’s hard enough to hold an edge but soft enough

to make scraping the edge easier. I used a dremel and files to first remove the razors

edge and then cut the shape into the old blade to make a scraper. After many passes

I obtained the edge I wanted.

 

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I then sanded it smooth, stained it with Fiebing’s and

left it to dry.

 

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After it’s good and dry I’ll rub it down and apply a coat of wipe on poly.

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Hi Augie, Lots of thoughts but not much progress. I’m still cussing my brother who was a

tool and die maker. He retired and moved to NC and doesn’t have any of his tools anymore! :angry:

 

I’m lusting over the Sherline 4000B Lathe Package but the Proxxon DB 250 Micro Woodturning

Lathe is much more in my price range. Then between the two you have the Taig MicroLathe II. I

know the Proxxon is only a wood lathe but how much metal would I turn? Then also I could use

it for now and sell it later if I decide to upgrade to a metal lathe. Oh the problems of semi retirement.

If I was still working fulltime I’d just work some OT and pay for it. :(

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Rusty,

 

I'm no expert by any stretch of the imagination, but I would offer this additional thought for you. Turning very small wooden parts in a wood lathe, using hand held tools, is a very delicate (and difficult) operation as just a tad too much pressure will destroy the part in the blink of an eye. If you use a metal lathe, the tools are held in the machine and applied with great control, making the manufacture of small parts so much easier. So it's not a question of, "how much metal would I turn", but more one of, "how much control of the tool do I need?". I know the outlay cost is more, but you will remember the quality of the Sherline long after you have forgotten the price.

 

Hope this helps.

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I've used metal lathes many years ago ..... never a wood lathe.  Grant's advice makes sense.  Of course you could always get a new brother-in-law.

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Tough choices it looks like, Rusty... metal lathe or new brother-in-law.  Hmm.......   ;)

 

Seriously, the control issue is a big factor. 

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