Jump to content

Recommended Posts

There probably are several ways to show the caulking between deck planks.

I have used a black marking pen, but found that it had a tendency to go over the edge. No problem, because the sanding afterwards took care of a lot (but not all).

 

Then I read here some where that someone used black paper between the planks. But how?

Here is my approach:

Take a section of black paper (available at office supply centers), spray some contact cement on it, and position the planks on edge. Press well and let it set overnight or so.

Then cut them apart, do a little sanding on the edges and fit them together.

Below I show the results of my experiment.

post-246-0-28167600-1432178011.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The paper method is an old one. 

 

There is an article in a past issue of the NRJ that discusses the effects of scale on color perception and that distance changes color intensity and sheen and glossiness.

 

In the light of accepting this phenom. and adapting to it:

 

In the sailing ship era, the "tar" used was not the petro based material in common use today and was not really pitch black. Instead, it was brown, red brown, grey brown.

I suggest the following:

Use paper that is thinner than what the actual scale caulked seam would be.

Dye it dark brown ( shoe leather dye, wood dye - other similar material).  The smaller the scale - the lighter the brown.

Glue it to the plank stack with TiteBond or which ever wood glue you use. (So that the paper/wood join is not weak.)

Separate with a very sharp blade.

After laying the deck, the last finishing step = scraping it with a single edge razor blade held vertical to the surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

still reckon the good old grey lead pencil rubbed along both sides of the planks before gluing is the quickest, easiest method. easy to sand if off if you go over the edges and once sealed looks great.

 

chris 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

still reckon the good old grey lead pencil rubbed along both sides of the planks before gluing is the quickest, easiest method. easy to sand if off if you go over the edges and once sealed looks great.

 

chris 

Confirm, for me as well!

Fam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For my Triton deck planking I used 'actual' caulking and it worked surprisingly well. I used dark wood filler and then applied black dye to it. The planks were set up with a paper between them to leave a slight gap and then the 'caulking' was pasted in. Once down a light scrape took the excess off and then once dry the planks needed a better scrape/sand. I was pleased with the result.

 

With this approach you need some extra meat in the plank depth to allow for the post calk scrape. I took the idea from Joh0868s Triton which gives an impressive view of the results..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some also use pigment (black, brown, etc.) mixed into the glue.  When gluing a plank, the edge is coated with the colored glue.  Seems to work well and for a prime example, see EdT's work in the scratch area... Naiad and Young America.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

It also depends very much on the scale you are using.

I tried glue/paper/thread on my 1:100 Prins Willem, and decided that pencil was fine enough with me.

From a distance you don't see the lines, from nearby you do.

 

But it is a matter of taste, some people show the treenailing using copper wire, others don;t use it at all. Both groups think they did the right thing.

 

Jan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings,

 

Agree with vossy and  mtaylor. The paper method reads too dark for practically any scale and becomes the "tail wagging the dog". In my opinion, a subtle dark line between planks looks best and compliments the deck and other details rather than competing with them for visual dominance. I have the same opinion about simulating deck fasteners: they always end up way out of scale and dominate the landscape. 

 

wq3296

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soft pencil on one edge and one end of each plank for me.  It has variety from place to place and is subtle generally.

As far as fasteners, check the scale very carefully.  A nail head would be maybe 1/8".  On the quarterdeck and officers' country the nail holes would be plugged with a small chip of wood, diamond shaped, and with the grain matching the plank.  Practically invisible even if you were standing on the actual deck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

another method is to glue down the deck planking,take @3oo grit sandpaper and scuff up a p

iece of aluminum then lightly wet sand the decking the aluminum oxide on the paper will stay in the cracks leaving black lines @ to scale.you can highlight dowels where boards are fastened this way also

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chuck,

Interesting idea, but my first thought was why would there be cracks between the planks?  They should be tight against each other.  Then I thought that if each planks has a slight chamfer on the edge, this will leave a gap for the aluminum.  The hard part though would be getting a perfectly even gap on every plank.

Do you have any photos you can share?  This idea is a bit intriguing.

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ill try im not much of a photographer if you sand the deck pretty smooth first it makes the gaps more uniform and the al.ox.comes right off the smooth surface also I make small indents with a pin where the trenails would be in the decking as in scale theyre too small to duplicate well otherwise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with those above that do the pencil method.  For me, it provides a hint of color but is subtle.  Living in San Diego I have the opportunity to see caulked deck planks on real sailing ships.  Even at the distance I can get above them, which is about 6 or 8 scale inches, the caulking is not overwhelmingly dark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chuck,

Interesting idea, but my first thought was why would there be cracks between the planks?  They should be tight against each other.  Then I thought that if each planks has a slight chamfer on the edge, this will leave a gap for the aluminum.  The hard part though would be getting a perfectly even gap on every plank.

Do you have any photos you can share?  This idea is a bit intriguing.

Allan

They are set tight, yes, but then opened with an iron to take the oakum.  The tar seals over the oakum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JB

 

Sorry for the miscommunication, my mistake.  I meant that the MODEL planking should have no gaps.   I imagine these would be tough to open as you describe on a model.

 

I have used pencil and tissue methods. The tissue is indeed less subtle than the greyish pencil.  I suppose using grey tissue in place of black would be a good alternative to those who prefer this method and want a bit of subtlety. 

 

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should refine my remarks.  On 1:64 scale I have used the pencil method with good results.  I'm currently working on a 1:24 scale and have put grey pastel paper between the planks.  They will have stain when ready, but I haven't got to that point yet so won't try to predict the result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By chance i posted a pic yesterday we shows what a real sailing ship deck looks like. 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/10677-excess-halyard/?p=322569

 

You cant see the fastenings ! This I think would be the case in most vessels

 

I am not going to try on my present build and when I get back to my Pegasus I may mask the fastenings. .

 

For caulking though I have found that paper and pen markings just dont work for me .

I use a very soft pencil on the edges of the planks but space them deliberately using a feeler gauge leaf .

post-905-0-97201000-1433713486_thumb.jpg

Then I find that the varnish i use on the decks seeping into the slight spaces and merging with the pencil give a result I am happy with.

post-905-0-18682800-1433713462_thumb.jpg

 

Ignoring the overprominent fastenings of course !!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just developed a powdered caulk it come in what ever colour you want from jet black to bright pink if you want. And cost about 10p a kilo and is uv fast and a solid fill so no gaps and is fine enough to fill the finest gaps. And you make it your self. Takes ten minutes to apply and fifteen to rub down.then just finish as normal.

 

This is a very dodgy bit of planking that I've caulked tonight and given three coats of polish. In about 1 1/2 hours

 

post-18378-0-20446500-1433813098_thumb.jpg

 

Sorry the photos are upside down its the latest update from Apple.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...