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Thanasis

Aegean Tserniki vessel by Thanasis - rigged as penna.

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Still here?...Thank you.

 

Sails

I started making the sails by measuring their imaginary lines on the model.

Then, I transferred their shape on a thin cardboard and made the needed corrections in contrast with the model.

Finally, by using those cardboard sails, I cut new ones from a thin cloth.

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On another piece of cloth, I applied a mixture from water and white carpenter’s glue in a ratio of 3/1.

When the cloth-mixture dried, I cut long strips and in a width as the half of the size of the supposed leaf (panel) of the sail.

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I used those strips to cover the edges of the sails by folding them over and secured them with white glue.

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I also cut and placed reinforcement patches from the same stiff cloth.

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Boltrope.

I started placing the bolt rope using white glue (what else…?) and forming eye splices at the corners.

I had read that following this method, some mates had used waxed paper in order to avoid glue-messing on the working surface.

I used just strips of masking tape and by working on its sticky surface-side, I had no problem…

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Some more details had to follow before the end.

 

Thanks

 

 

 

 

 

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Thank you all.

Navigation lights

After many tries with unlikely materials, I turned back to simplicity.

I took two colored led lights in a proper size, I removed the wires and gave them a “hair cut”.

With the use of a rotary tool, I turned their curved end, to flat.

Then I cut gold painted narrow paper strips and by making loops I covered the upper and lower parts.

Every loop was secured at its end with ca glue. I used more gold paper to cover some of the middle part.

To finish, I painted gold the flat upper part.

I think I had a decent result...

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Place of the anchor.

As you might have noticed in all previous photos of the real boats, appear not to have something (e.g. a cathead) that would suggest how the anchor was being raised to the side of the boat. Well, there wasn't anything.

The anchor was being raised at sea surface by a windlass and then by the use of some pulleys (the same attached  on the mast for lifting the cargo), it was being hoisted to the deck.

Moreover, there wasn't any particular place to be stowed on board. It was just being leaned and secured on the gunwale, as is shown in photo from another Gr. boat*.

The photo shows a member of a French mission in a Gr. boat circa 1900 in Cyclades Islands.

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So I did the same on my model...

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Edited by Thanasis

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Finishing my model I wanted to make also something that I would place it on the deck as a decoration.

From my photos I stood on some, which are showing islanders in front of their boats, having spread their trading stuff at the dock, usually clay pitchers.

I thought it would be nice if I could manage to place such a cargo on the deck of my model.

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I wasn't thinking to handmade something from clay, since the pitchers should be identical and elegant and I'm not that skilled.

So as always do, I went to the "place of inspiration", a local fake jewelry store.

I spent about an hour watching all of its stuff and making combinations in my mind.

I bought some beads and ear-piercing items and by cutting in half plastic rings, I came to what I wanted.

A proper painting gave me a good result.

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Thank you all, that ignoring the warning had the kindness to follow my build log.

 

You can see the finished model at the gallery.

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/gallery/album/1182-aegean-tserniki-vessel-rigged-as-penna/

 

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Edited by Thanasis

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Wow, just absolutely in love with this model.

 

May I ask, did you use a brush to paint? Did you use a primer before applying the colors? 

 

This model is absolutely gorgeous... it belongs in a museum!

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This is a wonderfully executed model of what is, to me, an unusual subject. A real pleasure to see and an inspiring piece of work. Congratulations!

 

John

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 That was a wonderfully interesting and educational build and a striking final product, Thanasis.

 After seeing it in the gallery, as I followed along, the nagging thought in my head was "how did those perfect terracotta jars come about".

 Brilliant work; thank you.

 

 Steve

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Thank you each one and every one, for your kind words.

I really didn't expect this welcoming since I think I have violated many rules in this build log ... :) 

Thank you all.

                              

Turksailor. Thank you for your kind words. I don’t want to spend much care or much money on my models. I see it just as a relaxing-joyful hobby that has to follow a low budget. So answering your query, yes I have used just simple modeling brushes and no, I didn't apply any primer. They have been applied three layers for every color and four for the white one.

 

Steeve. Thank you also for your kind words.

The funny thing is that, while I was dealing with one of those beads to form a pitcher, it dropped me on the floor. Bending over to pick it up, I hold it upside down the way I was dealing with. And then I realized that it would look better (closer to the real one) if I go forming it that way…

 

Thank you.

Edited by Thanasis

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^Hello Thanasis,

I read your article with great interest and want to congratulate you to this superb model.

Greek boats are seldom built since it is difficult to optain suitable plans.

I build working models and meanwhile have got two Greek sponge diving boats. One is a double ended perama which has a great likelihood to your tsernikoperama. She sails very well and is fast.

The second is a skarphee as it was built on the island of Symi. The hull looks very much like an Arabian dow. As the hull is fairly deep, the model needs some wind to get her going.

Edited by Joerg Gebhardt

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Thanks for your comment Joerg and let me express also my good impression meeting a non-Greek who is dealing with the traditional ship models of my country.

I have seen your work on "Agios Nikolaos" and it's very impressive..

As about suitable plans and without the intention of an advertisement, there are accurate hull drawings in the book which has been mentioned at the start of the built log.Those plans I follow in my models.

Sadly our team's effort (3w.naftotopos.gr) to spread Gr. ship models  by finding a kit company, offering plans-rigging details and copy rights with no any fee, didn't work out due the prerequisite number of secure buyers...!

Thanks

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Hello Thanasis,

So you have already seen my  Agios Nikolaos. The world of boat modellists is really small indeed. I found the plans for the Skarphee in a French boatmodelling magazine and it was initially built by a member of naftotopos gr., Mr G. Bouzounis.

If you want to learn more about it look here:   Forum für historischen Schiffsmodellbau und Geschichte  then go to:   Bauberichte (Building logs) and then to:   1890 Skarphee , ein griechisches Schwammtaucherschiff

 

Down at the bottom left handside is a device to select the language you want.

 

I tried to attach a few pictures of the models here but it did not work.

 

For me, Thanasis, it is a great pleasure to see these boats on the water and watch them sail along. They are ever so beautiful and colourful and render an atmosphere that no motorized model will ever attain.

As you said in your post # 49 modellists buy kits of the Victory and such, they don´t fancy the beauty of a littte workboat.

The book by Damianidis that you mentioned is out of print and  just in Greek, bad luck!

 

Regards

 

Jörg

Edited by Joerg Gebhardt

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Well,  with no doubt it's a small world... :) 

You found the drawings for your model (Skaphee) in Rc magazine no. 227 in an article which I wrote... for my good friend Bouzounis.

He is an excellent modeler but unfortunately he doesn't go well with English language....

I found the title of your build log in 3w.segelschiffsmodellbau.com

but I didn't manage to see your model...Don't know why.

Thx

 

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Thanasis,

 

I've just re-found your log here. What an attractive and beautifully executed working boat model. From the hull construction, planking and painting, to the deck furniture, masting, ironwork, and sails, it is all so engrossing to watch the progress.

 

Congratulations on such a fine model.

 

Elia

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www.segelschiffsmodellbau.com/f916-Skaphee-ein-griechisches-Schwammtaucherschiff.html

 

 

 

Hello Thanasis,

I tried to copy and paste the link. It did not work. So I wrote it down above. It works. Now you can look at the building log. Click on    Baubericht    to get started

So it was you, who wrote the article! What a small community! I was on vacation in France and bought the magazine by chance. Good luck I did!

 

When you click on the pictures you can enlage them.

 

Best regards

 

Jörg

Edited by Joerg Gebhardt

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Many thanks for your comment Elia and  the so many likes... :)

Jörg, I had no luck again ...I guess I have to be registered first but it's ok.

I feel nice just to know that another Gr. model has been built with the joy of a fellow modeller.

Thx

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A gold for this model AND a silver for your other one! Terrific! Congratulations.

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Thank you all for your kind word mates. I wish you similar successes...

Maristella,  in addition I wish you all the best to your company and wanting to intrigue you... Greek traditional boats are also "sails of the Mediterranean".  ;)

Thx

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