Jump to content
Mirabell61

SS Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse-(short KWdG)-1897-1914-by Nils Langemann - FINISHED - scale 1:144 - POF - first German four stacker of the Norddeutscher Lloyd line

Recommended Posts

Nils, since all the windows and doors are flat on the back, you could cast in a sand cast method.  Or with a lower temperature material you could use plaster or silicon for the mold.

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

many thanks for your comments, Michael, Bob and Christian,

 

Micheal,

in this small scale its not so easy to work out the fine details. I`ve seen that professional model builders often have a certain experience with details, but they also have special tools and techniques I`m not familiar with. Windows, portholes, etc. are sometimes only painted on, but in high precision...

 

Bob,

I was also thinking of low meltpoint metal (have already bought some like used for melting luck charms on new year), together with a Silicone mold.

The only reason for hesitating so far, was because I like the surface appearance of shiny brass. Also the post Treatment of such Little castings takes much time in fairing, removing burrs, etc..

 

Thanks for dropping in Christian,

and for your comment..

 

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice proect! I see forward with greatest interest, because an grand-uncle of me use "Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse" in August/September 1913 on a passage from Bremen to New York.

 

Can you send me a photo of the Body-Plan-Cross-section (length-cut)? I will illustrate the story of my family and search for pictures of interest.

 

Sorry, but my english is only for the kitchen...

 

Best regards!

 

Revier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a little update.....

 

now need to plank and mount the forecastle deck and the long promenade deck, before the most upper hull rails are mounted to the sides. Before this the metal plating can not start

 

Am also making thoughts of the stern decoration and ornaments, and been gathering what I feel may suit this job....

Also am meantime thinking of how to do the 3 different types of lifeboats in repeatable way of production (probably resin cast from prototypes and master moulds)

 

Nils

 

post-3445-0-65152200-1440667676_thumb.jpg

 

front waist deck is permanently glued on, small centering hole for frontmast is set and bulkhead for step to promenade deck is dry fitted

 

 

post-3445-0-85441100-1440667679_thumb.jpg

 

traffic corridor port to stb on aft waist, deckstripes permanently fitted, raw bulkhead piece for step to poop deck dry fitted and inner bulwarks painted white and mahagoni handrails put on

 

 

post-3445-0-21238300-1440667684_thumb.jpg

 

the handscetch helps to get overview of the elevation dimensions ( slight changes to suit the requirements pending...)

 

 

post-3445-0-33922100-1440667685_thumb.jpg

 

these hull rails go on when the forecastle. and promenade deck are planked and put on. Before that the metal-plating of the hull can not start

 

 

post-3445-0-66170300-1440667682_thumb.jpg

 

some of the decoration and ornaments intended to use, especially for the stern

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Patrick,

 

for the decoration I searched the Ebay for Gold Color pressed metal decoration. The larger one is of Card and can be found at Ebay for "Dresdner Ornamente"

The letters are  etched brass from my Hobby shop, and the twisted brass wire is for hanging oil painting Frames to the wall

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have just spent a very enjoyable hour or so with a glass of beer enjoying reading this build log. What a beautiful ship she was. Incredible modelling skills. I am nearing the end of my first model kit Mantua Gorch Fock, if only this steamship came as a kit!

 

Cheers from the Scottish Highlands,

 

Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks to Tony and David,

and all the recent appreciative "likes"...

 

Tony,

wellcome to dropping in, glad you find interest in this model. There was a fantastic  card-model (to be built) of this liner on the market in scale 1:250, unfortunately sold out, but which can be found at Ebay with a bit of luck.

Would like to see your Gorch Fock 2 Progress to date, any pics available ?, I looked up your last postings of  August 2014

 

David,

I`m not familiar with resin casting, making moulds for this purpose and using Silicone rubber, guess I Need to dig into this sooner or later

 

Nils

Edited by Mirabell61

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Nils,

Just browsed through your build log. Fantastic work and very neat finish. I once started off with the Emperator class. I actually had the 1:350 scale Titanic, but was never eager to build it. One fine day, I bought a book - German Passenger Liners, issued by Schiffer History; and when I saw the Emperator class Passenger liners, I looked at the Titanic, and uttered - Your day has come. Come to Daddy and let's do some conversion work on you. I started off, but then came along the Scharnhorst. First things first.

With regards to the port holes, did they actually protrude out with a flange or were they just inline with the the ship Hull? I will check my books and see how they actually were at that time. I am under the impression that at that time the portholes were of the flanged type.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Paul,

 

for the KWdG porthole arrangement I have here this pic where she is in the drydock. The portholes are actually flush with the hull, no flange,  the "eyebrows standing out, to lead rain- and splashwater around the porthole.

 

I made a little mock up in order to see how the critical porthole section just beneath the forecastle deck shall work out, leaving a minimal space just above the porthole for the eyebrow placement ( second hole from the right, with brass insert and "glassing")

 

Nils

 

(ups, here are the pics.....)

 

post-3445-0-85081800-1440771156_thumb.jpg

 

post-3445-0-04112300-1440771195_thumb.jpg

Edited by Mirabell61

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Nils,

I see that you have tried out a sample piece before putting your hands and tools to the job. Just one tip if I may, When it comes to drilling of port holes, this is the worst nightmare for us modelers. Passenger liners and German Warships were littered with port holes. I would strongly suggest to construct a jig tool. this can follow the deck line or the water line, according to how the portholes were actually placed. That is, if they in reality in a straight line or follow the curve of the deck lining. The jig must be able to move along the ship side. This would prevent the twist drill moving around.

If I am not mistaken and stand to be corrected on this, as time may play some tricks on my memory, I should have posted a picture of the wooden jig I made for the Scharnhorst.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Nils,

Just browsed through your build log. Fantastic work and very neat finish. I once started off with the Emperator class. I actually had the 1:350 scale Titanic, but was never eager to build it. One fine day, I bought a book - German Passenger Liners, issued by Schiffer History; and when I saw the Emperator class Passenger liners, I looked at the Titanic, and uttered - Your day has come. Come to Daddy and let's do some conversion work on you. I started off, but then came along the Scharnhorst. First things first.

With regards to the port holes, did they actually protrude out with a flange or were they just inline with the the ship Hull? I will check my books and see how they actually were at that time. I am under the impression that at that time the portholes were of the flanged type.

 

Hi Paul,

 

would have liked to see one of the "Emperator Class" liners keel-layed by someone here on this forum; The "Vaterland" for instance, being the first American super liner after taking over and re-naming to "Leviathan", a dream of a ship....

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Nils, :)

 Yes - I fully agree with you, a large scale model of the Vaterland would be more than welcome on this forum.

Actually the Emperator class consisted of three ships. After the armistice of the First World War, the Emperator was taken by the French and renamed 'Liberte', the Vaterland was take over by the Americans and renamed 'Leviathan'; while the third ship, which was still in the state of construction, and which was to be Christianed with the name of 'Bismarck' was taken over by the British. Cunard or White Star Lines.

 

I have a book which relates the story of the three ships. The book is published by Verlag of Germany. Quite expensive, as it cost me some 290 Euros including courier postage to Malta. But believe me Nils, it was really worth it. The book is full of construction pictures, and that is the detail we always look out for. I was informed that the set consists of six books, and I would believe that one of the books could be dedicated to the ship that you are building.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nils,

 

Wow, what a pleasure to come aboard...I just spent a wonderful morning looking through your log  :)

 

All I can say is absolutely amazing work, the details are superb (just love the Props and Ruder as I'm a long time RC guy...I understand your choice about the running gears).

 

You continue to be an inspiration to all of us Nils  :)

Edited by thomaslambo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Nils, :)

 Yes - I fully agree with you, a large scale model of the Vaterland would be more than welcome on this forum.

Actually the Emperator class consisted of three ships. After the armistice of the First World War, the Emperator was taken by the French and renamed 'Liberte', the Vaterland was take over by the Americans and renamed 'Leviathan'; while the third ship, which was still in the state of construction, and which was to be Christianed with the name of 'Bismarck' was taken over by the British. Cunard or White Star Lines.

 

I have a book which relates the story of the three ships. The book is published by Verlag of Germany. Quite expensive, as it cost me some 290 Euros including courier postage to Malta. But believe me Nils, it was really worth it. The book is full of construction pictures, and that is the detail we always look out for. I was informed that the set consists of six books, and I would believe that one of the books could be dedicated to the ship that you are building.

 

Hello Paul,

 

Thanks for your tip, seems to be a very interesting book, (resp. six books) I`ll be having eyes open for that publication

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Nils,

 

Wow, what a pleasure to come aboard...I just spent a wonderful morning looking through your log  :)

 

All I can say is absolutely amazing work, the details are superb (just love the Props and Ruder as I'm a long time RC guy...I understand your choice about the running gears).

 

You continue to be an inspirations to all of us Nils  :)

 

Hi Boyd,

 

thanks for your nice words today, glad you liked and enjoyed  the log-tour

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a Little update...

 

Build log part 17

 

 

the first Saloon and cabin wall section I start with is in the aft waist area, one deck lower. This has to be done now because the Long Promenade deck (when put on) will not allow Access to this part afterwards.

The metal sections of the superstructure will also be plated. The procedure is to produce a smooth wooden surface, and plate with ponced resembled "riveted"  metal surface.

Then cut free the positions in the foil where the port holes are to be drilled. Dry fit the brass handrails, then take off the handrails, primer the cabin walls, paint the surface, let dry, and then insert the "preglassed" portholes and the handrails again. Secure the handrail stanchions at the inner side of the walls with a drop of CA

 

Nils

 

post-3445-0-84682500-1440952326_thumb.jpg

 

a clean circular cut through the foil and a good centering in the wood enables the hole drilling in best possible way

 

 

post-3445-0-39452000-1440952328_thumb.jpg

 

this part takes 30 portholes and six doors

 

 

post-3445-0-71627900-1440952330_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

post-3445-0-49819600-1440952332_thumb.jpg

 

here the first handrail piece is dry-fitted

 

 

post-3445-0-07082100-1440952334_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

post-3445-0-42249200-1440952335_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-3445-0-55157400-1440952756_thumb.jpg

 

this is a liquid quick drying filler / primer that gives a wonderful surface to the white dull silk finish paint

(a Gunze / Sangyo, Japanese product)

 

 

post-3445-0-26231600-1440952759_thumb.jpg

 

this is the bulkhead for the step to the poopdeck, primered and painted

 

 

post-3445-0-01235300-1440953932_thumb.jpg

 

dry fit on the ship.....

 

 

post-3445-0-09996300-1440953935_thumb.jpg

 

four srews will later help hold this section securely in place

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bob,

 

I just looked up you "Hoga" build log, and yes, the deckhouse (your post #101 there)  and wheelhouse would have been wonderful candidates for "riveted" metal Skin structure. Maybe you are planing an appropriate Oldtimer steamship Project for the future.....

 

Nils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...