Jump to content
EdT

Young America extreme clipper 1853 - 1:96 POB model by EdT

Recommended Posts

Thanks for the "likes" and...

 

thank you, Greg.  See Naiad Vol II or YA Vol I for the complete method.  Its best to thickness sand the beams before slicing them off - as decscribed.  Individual beams may twist when passing through the sander.  It does work like a charm producing uniform beams and saves many hours.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried thicknessing plank widths with a jig and that worked. The jig was basically a sheet of basswood with a slot to hold the strip on edge.  The sheet was clamped into place on the sander and the strips fed through in slot.  I'm wondering if that might work on beams?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark,

 

I am sure what you suggest would work fine.  It would act as a guide that would keep the beams from twisting.  The only disadvantage I can see is that it would use the same line of sandpaper - unless it was made to adjust side to side.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 36 – Forecastle Deck Beams 2

 

Before setting the forecastle deck beams some under-deck work had to be completed.  In the first picture the main decking under the forecastle has been completed, the opening for the bowsprit has been sized and a large knee has been fitted to the forward side of the Samson post.

 

post-570-0-66428700-1448830662_thumb.jpg

 

On this model the bowsprit will step on the plywood bulkhead at the aft side of the opening.  A dowel into holes in both the bowsprit and the bulkhead would probably be the simplest method.  Next, the carrick bits that will support the windlass shaft were cut out.  In the next picture, blanks for two bits were pasted together with one pattern and are about to be cut out on the scroll saw.

 

post-570-0-19633100-1448830663_thumb.jpg

 

These two bits needed to be identical and also carefully fit so the windlass will be horizontal and will clear the deck and breast beam.   I left the bottom edge with some excess so the bits could be tailored to fit the actual space with the correct height above the deck for the holes that will take the windlass axle.

 

These bits also provide central support for the forecastle breast beam, so that beam needed to be positioned before fitting the bits.  In the next picture that beam has been cut to length and its height is being set at the side using a strip of deck plank.

 

post-570-0-55715900-1448830663_thumb.jpg

 

The deck planking needs to be flush with the top of the side. The height along the top of the side was well checked much earlier.   I set the deck beams on the top of the main rail, since this is at a convenient height.  Either the beam could be cut back or the rail notched to get the beams at the correct height.  All of this structure will be hidden by the deck, so any deck knees can be ignored.

 

Unlike all the main and lower deck beams, the forecastle deck beams are not set on the frame lines.  To mark the beam locations, measurements were taken from frame lines on the plan drawing for the forecastle and transferred to the shipway plan using dividers.  In the next picture a deck beam location is being transferred from the plan up to the rail using a square.

 

post-570-0-05737800-1448830664_thumb.jpg

 

The line drawn at the beam location can be seen at the base of the square.  With the first two beams positioned, the carrick bits and the Samson post knee could be trimmed to provide support for the beams.  All these parts have been fitted in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-58690700-1448830664_thumb.jpg

 

In this picture the carrick bits are pinned in place.  They have been positioned with a temporary windlass axle installed so they would be aligned when pinned.  The height of this axle was set using a gauge block cut to the correct height when the bottoms of the carrick bits were trimmed before setting.  In the next picture the axle has been removed and the bits glued to the deck.

 

post-570-0-12489200-1448830665_thumb.jpg

 

In this picture the breast beam has also been glued at the rails and to the carrick bits.  All pins were later replaced with copper wire bolts.  Before going any further the hawse holes needed to be drilled out and lined.  In the next picture the main hole on the port side is being drilled to final size by hand using a pin vise to hold the drill.

 

post-570-0-60450600-1448830665_thumb.jpg

 

Small pilot holes were drilled first by eye after locating the inside and outside centers – before enlarging the holes to final size.  The locating method was described in one of the posts on the framed model and in detail in the book.  It is basically a matter of locating the fore and aft positions and the heights on the sheer plan and transferring those to the hull using a height gauge.  The centers at the inside are at the waterway where intersected by keel-parallel lines from the centers of the chain tubes.

 

The last picture shows the brass lining inserted into the sized hole.

 

post-570-0-12001400-1448830666_thumb.jpg

 

All four hawse holes were installed in this manner. The linings were the filed off flush on the outside.  Work on the forecastle deck will continue in the next part.

 

 

Ed

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Giampiero,

 

Thanks for your comments - and thanks to all those who checked the "like" box.

 

I assume the saw your are referring to is the small Preac circular saw shown ripping a beam in post 35.  This is truly a great little tool.  I like it because it is simple, very solid in its construction and is a perfect size (2 1/4" dia. blade) for small work.  It lacks a tilting arbor, but this helps keep the blade rigid.  Adjusting the blade height is also a bit awkward.  However, the saw never needs any adjustment and always makes perfect cuts. I purchased the saw many years ago from Preac.  It is no longer available - except perhaps on ebay, but not currently.  The business closed when the owner passed away several years ago.

 

Ed 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 37 – Forecastle Deck Beams 3

 

In the first picture, all the forecastle beams have been installed and a template has been used to cut the outside line of the margin plank at the bow.

 

post-570-0-76471900-1449152414_thumb.jpg

 

A dummy bowsprit has been inserted to assure the final fit.  The beams have been set down into the main rail so the deck planking at the side will be flush with the tops of the outboard planks.  As mentioned earlier, there was no attempt to create authentic framing for this since all will be hidden by the deck.  Note also that the mooring bitts have been installed.  Square holes were cut into the main deck planking to insert these and glue them to a pine supporting member beneath.  They are mortised to fit over the forecastle deck beam.

 

In the next picture the margin plank has been installed at the bow and the starboard section is being glued to the beams.

 

post-570-0-31224300-1449152415_thumb.jpg

 

Deck planking was started at the center as with the main deck.  In the next picture the port margin plank is being fitted.

 

post-570-0-69878400-1449152415_thumb.jpg

 

Planking continued concurrently with the margin plank work.  Clamping required some thought.  To keep the appearance of this deck consistent with the other decks, I did not want to drill the planks for pins as was done on the framed model, but the method used for the other planking on this model (pin clamps) could not be used on the light, hardwood beams.  The clamps used in the picture were made using drawing pins.  These are shown in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-15832200-1449152416_thumb.jpg

 

The pin clamps that could not be used on this decking are shown at the lower left.  The drawing pin screw clamps were made by cutting crude threads on the drawing pins with a jewelers die plate, then screwing them into holes in pear blocks as shown.  The blocks could then be slipped under the beams and the pins tightened over the glued planks.  The next picture shows some of this work.

 

post-570-0-66913100-1449152416_thumb.jpg

 

In this picture the ends of the planks were joggled into the margin plank after the angle of the butted ends reached about 60 degrees. To be correct, the margin plank joint shown in this picture could have been made as a hook scarph.  Most of it will be covered by the capping fancy rail.  The next picture shows the decking flush with the top of the side and also the finished hawse holes and linings.

 

post-570-0-17236400-1449152417_thumb.jpg

 

Note that the outboard part of the main rail is still missing and was not added until after painting.  The last picture shows the completed forecastle deck.  

 

post-570-0-03227300-1449152418_thumb.jpg

 

The billet under the bowsprit has also been installed.  The triangular spaces between the margin plank and the knightheads would be covered by the capping rail later. This was the state of the model at the end of August.

 

Next, the channels and pin rails.

 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Ed,

I have to butt in at this point. I am following your post(s) of the YA since they first came into being. I have ceaced to comment each and every post, although all of them left me dumbfounded. I was almost ready to quit model building altogether, because I felt that I never would achieve the building of PoF models your way -those were my original ambitions.

Now with your PoB model in the making I started to gain confidence again. Although I do not have the possibilities to redraw my plans using CAD I will do my very best with photo copier and scanner to bring my plans to working and modelling conditions.

I thank you for rekindling my confidence and aspiration.

From Hamburg with greetings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Remco, but I don't know - nerve or lack of imagination?  I just couldn't imagine me doing this before installing the margin planks, at least not at 1:96 - probably not at even at 1:48.  Actually, marking out and cutting into the margin in place is quite easily done and with a bit more care the results could undoubtedly be much improved.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 38 – Channels and Pin Rails

 

The upper channels were installed first.  They were glued into the gap in the outer planking left for the main rail.  In the first picture these have been installed and one of the lower channels is being positioned and glued.

 

post-570-0-64459600-1449845480_thumb.jpg

 

 

The lower channels were first located and pinned then separated on the pins so glue could be applied as shown.  The next picture shows one of these being clamped after gluing.

 

post-570-0-21652500-1449845481_thumb.jpg

 

The channel is both pinned and clamped.  The small screw clamp at the center adjusts and holds the lower channel in a horizontal position.  After the glue had set the pins were replaced by epoxied wire bolts to strengthen the joint.

 

Next the pin rails inside the bulwarks were made and installed.  The holes were drilled thru these on the milling machine to maintain even spacing and a smooth line.  In the next picture the paint is being filed off the inside of the top timbers below the main rail so the pin rails can be glued.

 

post-570-0-01418800-1449845482_thumb.jpg

 

After the pin rail was fitted and any width adjustments made to ensure the correct projection inside the rail, it was clamped in position and holes were drilled through it into each toptimber.  These were used for pins to maintain alignment when gluing and later replaced by wire bolts – epoxied in to strengthen the connection against future rigging strains.  In the next picture a rail has been pulled out on the pins for application of glue.

 

post-570-0-53539600-1449845482_thumb.jpg

 

The rail was then pushed into position and clamped.

 

With all this work completed, the hull could be painted.  The methods I used for this were covered elsewhere so I will not repeat here.  Once the hull and the sections of the white outer main rail were painted, those sections could be installed in the gap left in the planking.  The section around the stern that was made earlier is being glued in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-00600600-1449845483_thumb.jpg

 

This piece was fitted and trimmed earlier to expose the correct width outside the planking.  The next picture shows one of the installed section between channels.

 

post-570-0-52326200-1449845483_thumb.jpg

 

The last picture shows the hull on the port side at this stage.

 

post-570-0-04445400-1449845484_thumb.jpg

 

The work I planned for this model was almost complete at this stage.  All that remained was to install the capping fancy rail along the top of the side. 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should donate her to MSW to auction off. You get a million dollar tax deduction, MSW gets a boatload of money selling her and the buyer gets to spend the rest of his/her life rigging her. A win-win-win situation all around!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the comments and "likes" - and for the suggestion, Greg.

 

Its true that I do not intend to complete this model.  Rigging more than one of these might tip the scales to insanity.  Actually, Greg, I will give your suggestion some thought.  On the other hand, letting this escape captivity would give someone a chance to find all the little careless glitches I let creep into it.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 39 – Stern Fancy Rail

 

The so-called “fancy rail” capped the tops of the bulwarks along the main rail, but at the forecastle and poop decks it also served to seal off and make watertight the top of the framing at the side.  Although the curved margin plank below covered the tops of the timbers in these areas, this was not likely a caulked, waterproof joint.  For this reason, the fancy rails at the forecastle and poop needed to be wide enough to overlap the outboard planks and also the inside margin plank by enough to permit good caulked joints.  I wrestled with this because published sections through the bulwarks at the main deck generally show capping rails too narrow to meet the needs described above where they are at deck level.  To resolve this, I decided to make the fancy rail wider at the end decks and step it down at the breast beams to a narrower width along the main deck bulwarks.  A long story, but one that builders of the model should find useful.

 

The work on the fancy rail started at the stern.  The process for making the curved, hook-scarphed pieces was used on the margin plank below and on all similar pieces at both ends.  Since I took a lot of pictures of the method on this rail, and since there are a number of these pieces to make, I decided to show the process that I use for this in some detail. Although it is covered in depth in the book for the framed model, this description may be of help to builders of this smaller version.   In the first picture the first piece has been cut and pinned on the starboard quarter.  

 

post-570-0-14786800-1450190988_thumb.jpg

 

Pin holes were pre-drilled for a sliding fit with the pins.  The joint of the two stern sections will be on the centerline – staggered from the joints on the margin plank below.  On this model all the pieces were cut from ¾” stock.  I used this as a maximum thickness on this version so modelers could cut members to size with a good 4” circular saw and not need major tools like full size band(or circular) saw and thickness sander(or planer) that would be necessary if starting with the thicker stock that is needed for many pieces on the framed model.  In this case the stock was readily available ¾” maple cut to a thickness of 3½” (just over 1/32”).  It will be painted.

 

In the next picture the scarph joints have been formed at the ends and the piece re-pinned in place.

 

post-570-0-69216800-1450190988_thumb.jpg

 

The piece extends about 3” outside of the outboard planking and covers about one-half of the margin plank.  The piece was initially formed by the process shown below for the second piece on the port side.

 

post-570-0-04286400-1450190989_thumb.jpg

 

The ¾” width of maple strip was first marked to the shape of the stern from below as shown.  The piece is being test fit in the next picture after cutting the outer curve.

 

post-570-0-54856900-1450190989_thumb.jpg

 

In the next picture end of this piece is being marked from the joint of the piece below.

 

post-570-0-05348300-1450190990_thumb.jpg

 

The full width of the piece was then marked out using a compass set to the width of the plank with an extended leg held to the outer curve.  It was then carefully cut and shaped to this line.  Care is needed because of the weak cross grain at the ends.  I believe in an earlier post I pasted similar pieces to a scrap piece to protect the ends on a similar piece for cutting.  The next picture shows the piece slipped under the first piece, fit into place and being drilled for locating pins.

 

post-570-0-90476700-1450190990_thumb.jpg

 

Once pinned the joint on the new piece can be marked out using a very sharp pencil as shown in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-87639800-1450190991_thumb.jpg

 

The joint was then cut on the second piece and fitted to the first as shown below. 

 

post-570-0-58635100-1450190992_thumb.jpg

 

This picture was taken during the cutting and fitting process.  Note that the joint has not yet been cut at the forward end of this piece.  I will not describe cutting these joints since the method appears in a number of my other posts and is fully described in the book – and in the Naiad books.

 

In the next part the side rails along the poop will be fitted and all these rails rounded off, painted and installed.

 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the other hand, letting this escape captivity would give someone a chance to find all the little careless glitches I let creep into it.

 

Ed

But as long as those still look way better than my own best efforst, I wouldn't mind looking at your glitches :)

(Not interested in buying, though :) )

 

Jan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 40 – Stern Fancy Rail 2

 

OK.  Christmas is past and it is time to get back to work – slowly at first, starting with a POB build log update – then off to the shop.  In the last part, the aft sections of the stern fancy rail were installed.  In the first picture below, the starboard side section is being fitted.

 

post-570-0-98470400-1451312095_thumb.jpg

 

This piece was first shaped by tracing the outer profile along the hull – as was done for the stern pieces - then marking its width, its length, and the joint.  In the picture the joint has been rough-cut and is being test fitted.  You may notice that the stern section in the picture has been sanded somewhat.  Actually there is quite a bit of this to be done on the top rail after bolts are installed, to match the rounded edges, etc.  As long as the line against the black and the deck is left intact this is not a problem, since the top of the rail can be refinished without having to cut in the line at the edges.

 

In the next picture the section of rail shown above has been painted and is being glued down with the help of locating pins and screw clamps.

 

post-570-0-56695900-1451312096_thumb.jpg

 

The next picture shows the clamps gripped under the mizzen channel and the main rail.

 

post-570-0-03260000-1451312097_thumb.jpg

 

In the next picture the rail on the opposite side is being installed.

 

post-570-0-48926300-1451312097_thumb.jpg

 

In the picture the leftmost clamp is closing the scarph joint in the rail.  Note also that these rail sections end at the forward edge of the breast beam.  At this point the rail thins down in width, so the next sections along the main deck will be narrower, but the outside line of the rail will be flush.

 

The last picture shows the rail around the poop deck completed.

 

post-570-0-01000800-1451312098_thumb.jpg

 

The rail at the bow was installed next.

 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 41 – Forecastle Fancy Rail

 

We are almost approaching the end of the modeling I did on the 1:96 version of Young America.  In the last part the fancy rail around the stern was installed.  The same methods were used on the fancy rail at the bow – with a few minor differences.

 

In the first picture, the central, forward section of the rail has been pinned in place – prior to cutting the scarph joints.

 

post-570-0-60731600-1452526101_thumb.jpg

 

A template made from one of the pdf drawings was used, since the outer shape could not be traced as was done on the stern.   The joints were then formed, the inside (only) edge rounded by sanding, and the piece painted.  It is shown pinned in place below.

 

post-570-0-21571800-1452526102_thumb.jpg

 

The side pieces were then fitted in the same manner as those at the stern – as shown below.

 

post-570-0-52955200-1452526102_thumb.jpg

 

The joints were then formed on these, the edges rounded, and the pieces painted before installation. The starboard piece is being glued in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-08564400-1452526103_thumb.jpg

 

Note the use of a screw clamp to close the joint to the forward section.  The next step is shown in the last picture.

 

post-570-0-85391400-1452526103_thumb.jpg

 

There is a small triangular area between the knightheads and the rail on each side which must be capped.  In the picture, small pieces are being fit over these areas.  The outside edge of the forward piece was left unrounded for this work.  Fitting these with an invisible joint required some sanding of the top faces of the installed pieces – as can be seen.  These were of course painted over later – after the outside edges were made flush with the main pieces and rounded over.  Unfortunately, I did not take a close-up picture of the finished work.

 

All that now remained to do on this model was to add the fancy rails along the main deck.  This would bring it to the relatively presentable state for the trip to the NRG conference in October.  I will cover that last bit of work in the next – and perhaps final – part.

 

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 42– Fancy Rail Completion

 

This will be the last post on the POB version of the model, since it’s purpose as a demo model for the book had been fulfilled at this stage.  This stage of completion for both models constitutes the scope of volume I of the book and can be seen in the last picture in this post.  This point was reached on the framed version at the end of May 2015 and for the POB version in early October 2015 – just before the NRG Conference.

 

The only step remaining to be covered on the POB version is the completion of the fancy rails that cap the bulwarks along the main deck - quite a simple process after the curved shapes at the ends.  In the first picture a section of rail on the port side has been made, painted and pinned in place.

 

post-570-0-35224800-1453386458_thumb.jpg

 

The pins are placed in the toptimbers.  The holes will later be filled with copper wire bolts to reinforce the connection and fill the holes.

 

 The width of this rail steps down at each of the breast beams.  The reason for wider widths at the poop and forecastle were explained in an earlier post.  In the next picture the rail has been raised on the pins so glue can be applied to the top of the bulwark and toptimbers.

 

post-570-0-87305200-1453386458_thumb.jpg

 

As I have noted at other times, this method avoids having to find pinholes under a layer of glue.  In the next picture the rail has been pushed down and clamped.

 

post-570-0-35383600-1453386459_thumb.jpg

 

At this stage all the excess glue was washed off with water. The next three pictures repeat the process on a forward section of the starboard rail.

 

post-570-0-73968600-1453386459_thumb.jpg

 

post-570-0-30629200-1453386460_thumb.jpg

 

post-570-0-76848100-1453386460_thumb.jpg

 

Once all the pins had been removed, wire bolts were epoxied in and the top of the rail was filed/sanded smooth and repainted.  The sides of the rails were left untouched to avoid having to paint the white/black joint line.  The last picture shows the POB model at completion next to big sister.  All the remaining work that will be done on the larger framed version will be by methods that could be used on both.  That remaining work, including masting and rigging, are planned to be included in Volume II.

 

post-570-0-33128300-1453386461_thumb.jpg

 

Those that attended the NRG conference at Mystic will probably have seen the models pictured above.  For the conference they were mounted on temporary bases with the base drawings attached.  The POB version remains as shown, residing in my basement.  The framed version has progressed substantially, as followers of the other blog will have noted.

 

I hope the increased level of method description in these postings will prove helpful to purchasers of the book who wish to build the POB version.  As I mentioned earlier, I have made these posts and given more process detail to supplement the information provided in the book on this version.

 

I like the size of this model and it is very tempting for me to consider finishing and rigging it, but I suspect after doing that work on big sister I may be in for a break and perhaps something different.  We’ll see.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,
 
I think your combo on the 1/72 scale framed Young American and your 1/96 scale POB ship are a great combo of techniques, especially since one will be rigged.  It gives a builder interested in a clipper ship a tutorial on building either hull style, in either scale, rigged or unrigged.  Lots of options to choose from! 

 

And . . . I blame your excellent build logs for casuing me to buy a copy of: The American-Built Clipper Ship, 1850-1856 by William L. Crothers.  :)

 

Erik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll add my thanks and appreciation for your detailed explanations and photo essays Ed. The techniques you have so skilfully demonstrated and explained, are applicable to a wide range of models and are an absolute treasure. Thank you for taking so much time and effort to post in such detail for the benefit of all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...