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USS Brig Syren by Dubz - Model Shipways - 1:64 - 18 gun brig

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Lovely work as always, Dirk. Even when I bought strips of walnut I found that the width on some would vary. It's what prompted me to buy a table saw as I thought I may be able to cut my own -- but I have yet to find out how to do that more accurately than the bought stuff.

 

Very interesting to see your approach to the breeching ropes on the Sherbourne's cannon. Are you leaving them there so they can look like bolts, or are they going through the bulwarks just to act as markers for when you get round to it? I can't quite see where they are coming through as they are in shadow on the pics, so I'm assuming it's through drilled holes rather than the gunports.

 

Tony

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Dirk,

 

it's time for you to change to the dark side of modelling. With your skills you will dow very good models also without using a kit. And the best I didn't told you:

there is no bad kit wood. You can choose your timber from every source you like.

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Hi Dirk

I have been following both your builds with keen interest, they are both superb, and inspiring.

One quetion, on your planking above the waterline each plank is clearly defined, is this the wood or have you used -for want of a better phrase - caulking of some kind?

I ask because the effect is great.

 

 

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Your planking looks very good! And by the way, you are not the only one who had some initial planking problems. I had to redo some of my gun port framing as well. This is always very frustrating and the thought of using a chainsaw to solve the problem sometimes is very tempting . . .  :)

 

Thomas

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@tkay: Hey Tony, you "see" more than there is :D The ropes are just through the gunports, nothing more :D

 

@Anobiumblabla ... :D: I know, I know, I know ... :D

 

@Skippy: The caulking is made by "coloring" the edges of the planks with a simple pencil ... I might do it with blackpaper for the deck, as the cualking has imo noch constantly strenght.

 

@Gahm: " the thought of using a chainsaw to solve the problem sometimes is very tempting" ... Haha, you made me smile ... but ... arghh .. YOU are one part of my frustration too ... your build is outstanding ..I'm jealous :D

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Getting ahead of myself, there, ho hum. Too clever for my own good. Put it down to age, preconceptions and eyesight. But thanks for the clarification!

 

Tony

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One of the parts I love and hate is coming soon, the nailing ;) Love, because I love the look, hate, because it's not really fun to drill hundreds of holes and prepare hundreds of nails ... sure, most will be done with the waxingmethod, but the nails on the whales will be from gauge wire, and to make it even harder not the easier, softer brass wire but iron wire, gnarf. Brass might be to "bling bling", where iron will give a more discreet contrast. Less distracting imo. I did this for the Sherbourne allready.

 

The following picture shows the nailingpatterns I have in mind, any comments are welcome ;)

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_146.jpg

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Yesterday I could finish the whales. Unfortunateley there where one 5/32" x 1/32" strip missing but I replaced it with some pearstrips.

On the position of the lower whale I pinned a temporary batten as guide for the "middle" whale which I then glued with a combination of CA (for the bow and the stern, and some drops inbetween) and "normal" wood glue. I then removed the batten to place the final lower whale withe the now glued middle whale as guide ... and so on ;) The seams are just made with a little cut. Aftherall the edges get rounded a bit and the whole whale was sanded.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_157.jpg

 

I'm still struggeling with the wood. Am I to perfectionist and only moaning or is it my kit? The following picture shows the 5/32" x 1/16" strips and as you can see there is a big difference (imo) with the dimensions, the colors and the quality of the sawing (some are really perfect, some are ******) ...

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_147.jpg

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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I'll have to agree that much of the wood left a lot to be desired.  If I encounter this on my next build I'm going right to Hobbymill.

 

That said, your hull looks great.

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Hull with whales is now painted down to the waterline plus some mm. I used Tamiya masking tape and Humbrol color. It's painted three times. After the first I waited a day and then sanded it down a bit with 600 paper, after the second I waited another day and then polished with a cotton towel, as this will remove a bit of the color especially on the edges I painted the third time, waited 4 hours and did the final polish to get a little shine on the matt color.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_164.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_165.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_166.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_167.jpg

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Hull with whales is now painted down to the waterline plus some mm. I used Tamiya masking tape and Humbrol color. It's painted three times. After the first I waited a day and then sanded it down a bit with 600 paper, after the second I waited another day and then polished with a cotton towel, as this will remove a bit of the color especially on the edges I painted the third time, waited 4 hours and did the final polish to get a little shine on the matt color.
 
USS_Syren_Baubericht_164.jpg
 
USS_Syren_Baubericht_165.jpg
 
USS_Syren_Baubericht_166.jpg
 
USS_Syren_Baubericht_167.jpg
 
cheers,
 
Dirk

 

 

The correct approach if to paint model. But in my opinion the hull of your model looks beautifully and it is a pity to paint it, can establish more better than a level from black wood.

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Finishing Chapter 5, the last thing to do were the nails. I decided (might change again ;)) not to nail the whales and else.

 

As a guide I used my nailpattern printed on a transparent sheet. I then used an awl to mark the holes to drill. Big mistake with this wood ... arghhh ... as the wood got "pressed" horizontally a bit. 

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_171.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_172.jpg

 

Holes drilled.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_172.jpg

 

Waxing

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_174.jpg

Edited by Dubz

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Problem. As the awl pressed the wood to much, the wax is not only in the drilled holes but a bit in the horizontal outside ... arghhh ....

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_177.jpg

 

Anyway, pictures of the hull ;)

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_181.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_182.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_183.jpg

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Even using a 0.6mm drill for the treenail holes, and after varnishing the deck planking to stop splintering I found that occasionally the wax would still drift along the grain a bit. But then I was rubbing the cold wax in with a spatula, and it was just the kit's maple for the decking. All the same, I still like the method of using wax that your build of the Sherbourne showed me. Your current build remains as wonderful and instructive as always.

 

Thanks

 

Tony

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Thanks for your kind comment always Tony! Thats motivating to go on. I guess one of my major problems is that I'm not used to this kind of wood, it's so sensitive. I have the feeling only a closer look at it and you got a ditch or whatever ..:( I had no problems with the Sherbourne waxing clearly, pear seems to be much more robust and unsensitive and though imo easier to handle. Anyway, also it is frustrating it is always learning ;)

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Going on with Chapter 6 I made the stripwood and fashion pieces for the stern transom. I hope all will go well, as my whales are a bit deeper than they should ...

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_189.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_190.jpg

 

I bought me some nice books :D

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_191.jpg

 

cheers,

 

Dirk

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Dirk I have the Fighting Ships book. I think it is wonderful. Tell me what you think of the Sea Painting book. it is one I have considered. It might just go on the wish list.

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Hej Floyd,

 

I think it is a nice book. A lot of pictures with background informations (history and painting). I like it ;)

 

Dirk

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I very much admire the art of Geoff Hunt. He did most (all?) of the cover art for the Patrick O'brian series of books. Some really spectacular paintings.

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The Cap Rail for the stern is quite challeging ... I like to have the top of the cap following the run of the hull, this is quite hard with the wood. I remember that for my Alert there was a wood delivered I could easily bend in every direction I want, atm I try to find out what wood this was ;)

 

So before finishing the stern I started with Chapter 7 and did the inboard planking

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_192.jpg

 

I glued some filler at the bow to make sure to get a nice curve there.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_193.jpg

 

After the planking was done I filed and sanded the gun ports (something I would like to be "better" .. it's hard for me to get exact optical squares ...). Anyway I took the change to make the "overlappings" (don't know how exactly this is called) more constantly, even the ports are now slightly bigger then they should, I think this is more easyily to overlook than the inconsistently overlappings.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_196.jpg

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I then painted the inboard in red.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_200.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_201.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_202.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_203.jpg

 

Before you guys miss my typical moaning about the wood :D I found out where all the ditches come from. It's from the clamps .. arghhh ... this wood is so sensitive, that even a light clamp will have enough pressure to ditch the wood ... gnarf ... :D

 

Next to do will be all the cap rails and a working stand

 

Cheers,

 

Dirk

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Inboard planking looks good.  She sure is RED!  That tends to disappear as the ship comes together.

 

Yup, that stern rail will test your patience.  It's a matter of picking the right piece of wood and patience.  You'll get it.

 

Nice, clean work.

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Thanks Christian, much appreciated!

 

Got another, very nice book :)

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_204.jpg

 

Today I could finish the cap rail for the stern. Fortunately I found one of the easy to bend wood strips in my wood collection. I have no idea what kind of wood it is, maybe someone can help to identify.

 

It's absolut easy to bend, it' hard to cut, and very hard to sand or file. When sanded you get a really smooth surface and nice rounded edges. Imo the perfect wood for a stern, should be part of every kit as it makes it much easyier!

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_205.jpg

 

Bending the cap rail.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_207.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_208.jpg

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Cap rail and fashion pieces.

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_210.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_212.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_212.jpg

 

USS_Syren_Baubericht_214.jpg

 

For better fixation of the cap rail I used some nails. The next days I will try to sand it a bit more down, as it is a bit to big as suggested and then paint the whole thing black :)

 

Cheers,

 

Dirk

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