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AnobiumPunctatum

HM Sloop Fly by AnobiumPunctatum - a POF model in scale 1:32

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After a Long time I can Show new Progress of the build of my Sloop. After the stem I started building the lower and upper apron. Especially the lower apron, was really difficult. I need three trys until I get an result which I decided to use for my build. I think that I wouldn't get it better. I accent all glueing joints with brown color.
 
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After finishing the stem looks as in the following picture:
 
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David Shows in his book a simplified method for Building the rising woodI decided to follow the more detailed way, because I have a very precise Position of every second Frame. I think that this will help me in the future. I used this simple dummy frame during the build for checking the wide of the notches
 
6366653230393033.jpg
 
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Next step will be the after deadwood.

Edited by AnobiumPunctatum

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Nice to see you back again, Christian. The work so far looks lovely. As Greg points out, the scores in the rising wood will locate your square frames positively and accurately. It's too bad no-one will ever see them later on!

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Next step is the after deadwood.

 

I made the components of different strong woods, to make the shapeing later easier. The center line was marked with small stencils and a small 1.5mm drill bit was used to set holes for small pins. The following photo shows the alignment of the lower part on the keel.

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All components are put temporarily together
3637366436643764.jpg
 

Before the components van be glued together, the upper Notches for the last parallel frames must be milled.
After assembly, the deadwood is supported from the back with small wood pieces to have a smooth and, above all, stable support during milling:

3761623638323736.jpg

As final step the template will be cut out:

6637623263313562.jpg

The last picture shows the deadwood after milling the starbord site
6664393765663537.jpg

Next step will be the port side.

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Thanks very much for the likes and comments.

You are right, Greg. I have to sand this later down. I don't find a way to do this with my small mill and chisels.

There's much more to sand down. 

 

I'am not sure what is more complicated, the stem ore the stern deadwood. I think the stern, because there are a lot of different steps to do and you have to think about every step, before you start. I made me a small list of all single steps and hope I've nothing forgotten.

Edited by AnobiumPunctatum

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Greg,

 

CNC would certainly make this easier!

 

I don't have a CNC mill. I use a simple mill with a coordinate table.

 

I work a lot with the PC during my job and so I thought also of using a CNC for model building - there are some interesting kits in the internet. But than I thought it will be much more satisfactory to build the model by hand. It's completely different to what I do in my job and so it is a big challenge which I like.

 

I know that I will have imperfections, but this is what a model makes individual and interesting. Also the old time modelers and shipbuilders build their ships manual. So why not to do the same?

Edited by AnobiumPunctatum

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True what you said druxey, but then using a CNC or normal mill does not take any skill out of it, it only moves the required skill to a different arena. One can as easily say "Don't use an electric scroll saw, or chisel, use a carving knife only" :o :o :P :P The use of any tool got its own skill set to master

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The second year of my build is almost over. Not much progress this year, but I hope that I can post a last update at New Year's Eve.

 

It's time to say Thank You to all who followed my log, to all who wrote their own log I where I found so much hints and inspiration and to the crew of this wonderful forum for their great job..

 

3333636363653539.jpg

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During the work on the Deadwood, I found an interesting detail on the original drawing.

 

3738336237346363.jpg

 

David wrote in his book, that the knee will end under the lower filling transom. If I interpret the line right, it looks that the knee also sits in front of and under the other transoms. Is it possible, that this part looks similiar to the keelson or the stemson? Or show the drawing smaller parts of timber which are sitting only under the transoms?

Perhaps someone can help me how to interpret the line correct.

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A follow up:  I did a quick check some other few drawings - among them Plate X in Steel, and (as a refresher) the Naiad drawings.  This dashed extension on other drawings is the underside of the keelson (actually the keelson knee) that continues up to the top of the false post. It caps over the forward ends of the filling transoms.  Is there not a drawing that shows the keelson?  This should answer the question.

 

Ed

Edited by EdT

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