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mrshanks

Patrick Henry by mrshanks - Lauck Street Shipyard - Scale 1:32 POF Admiralty style

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I'm currently about 70% completed with a new model from Lauck Street Shipyard.  Based on an Armed Virginia Sloop, she bears the fictional name of Patrick Henry.  I'm posting a build log in the hopes of generating some interest for this unique and amazing model designed and produced by Bob Hunt.  I'm the proud owner of Kit #002 and have over 200 hours in the build so far.  I've taken plenty of pictures along the way and will try to release a new post every day or so until the log catches up to my current progress.

 

I hope you enjoy.

 

Mike Shanks

Edited by mrshanks

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This kit comes with quality materials and excellent packaging.  Offered in a variety of hardwoods, I choose the Redgum and Cherry option.  I really like the way all the strip wood is organized by build topic versus type/size.  This will make the build go much easier.  There are 11 sheets of CNC cut parts, 22 individually labeled packages of strip wood, and a box of excellent 3D printed parts.  To my knowledge, this might be the first kit to include 3D printed parts.  There is also a special building jig and a display base.  The CD's are packed full of documentation and build photos.  5 sheets of full sized plans and parts identifiers rounds out a box that weighs in at over 17 pounds.  Here are a few pics.

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Edited by mrshanks

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Here the first 8 frames have been glued up.  A pretty straight forward procedure of cleaning up the parts and gluing them together on top of a printed template.  I really like the sister-framing technique.  Those of you planning to build this kit will need access to a color printer as there are quite a few sheets that have to be printed out.  My first frame took nearly 2 hours to build.  However, through repetition I now have the process down to 30 - 40 minute per frame.  There are 9 parts for each frame.  It's very nice working with hardwood versus the typical basswood of most kits.  There will be lots of "firsts" for me with this kit... my first true plank on frame build, my first using hardwoods, my first Bob Hunt kit, and my first admiralty model....  very little rigging and minimal planking.  This is gonna be fun!!

 

 

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I wish I could get plans for this, that way I could build my own, I have the MS kit and would love to make this kit with a plank on frame... using what I already have... it would be easier then a full scratch... 

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I have kit #20 and chose hard maple frames with cherry deck beams and framing.  I'll be starting a build log soon.  The kit is fantastic!

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22 hours, 4 sanding sticks, 12 #10 blades, nearly 6 billets of redgum, 243 CNC parts, and 2 cut thumbs later - all 27 frames have been constructed.  Things went a lot better and safer once I started clamping the parts into my Panavise.  My repeatable process was as follows:

 

1.  Print the template and cut out the parts

2.  Trim the tabs and lightly sand every surface of every part (some frames have 9 parts while others have 10)

3.  Test lay-out the parts onto the template to get the orientation and best match for the parts

4.  Apply double-sided tape to the template

5.  Glue the pieces together on the template using the tape to keep the pieces in place

6.  Place a book and some weight on top of the assembled frame.  Allow the glue to dry for at least 30 minutes (I used Weldbond)

7.  Remove weights, remove frame from template, label the frame with a pencil and throw away the used template

8.  Repeat 26 more times!!!

 

Some additional tips:

 

- I used several sharp #10 Xacto blades to carefully trim off the billet tabs from each part

- You might want to use some carving gloves or similar to prevent accidental nicks and cuts

- It's important to pay close attention to the grain of the wood when trimming off the tabs.  It will cut easily in one direction but not the other

- Use your sanding stick to lightly sand every surface of each part.  Some of them have very minor chatter marks from the CNC mill that need to be smoothed out to give the best appearance

 

So far, so good.  No issues at all thus far.  Smooth sailing.  With that out of the way we can move on to beveling all the frames inside and out

 

Total build duration so far:  22 hours

 

 

 

 

 

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Unlike most models, a lot of the frame beveling takes place off the model prior to assembly.  This is possible due to the nature of the CNC design and the provided templates. 

 

  • I used a set of lexan scissors left over from my radio controlled model days.  They have curved blades which works nicely for cutting out the paper templates
  • After I glue the templates, I label them with the frame number and an "F" to indicate for the forward side
  • Used Elmer's Rubber Cement to apply the templates to the frames.  Works well but is a little messy.  Luckily the cleanup is easy
  • I primarily shaped each frame bevel with a Dremel tool and finished up with sanding sticks. 
  • It's important to keep the beveled surfaces flat to ensure the planks lay properly later on.
  • The bevel follows the green line on the front side and the red line on the stern side.  I used a marker to darken the top of one of the frames so you can see how the template depicts the orientation of the bevel

It has become obvious to me now that much of the time spent on this model will be involving these frames.  It makes sense considering the frames are the center piece for this type of admiralty/craftsman style model.  The time saved by not having rigging and minimal planking gets consumed on the frames.

 

Mike Shanks

 

 

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Some people may have trouble visualizing the frame beveling and I totally understand that feeling.  I started with Frame 9 as it has the most bevel of any of the frames and is easier to visualize.  After completing Frame 9, the rest of them go much easier.  To confirm you are getting it right, you can hold the frame over the top of the jig drawing found on Plan Sheet 5.  If you line it up and close one eye you can easily see that the angle of the shape you are beveling will match the drawing provided in the plan.  I tried to show that in one of the pictures below.  I get the beveling close with a dremel tool and then finish it off with a wooden sanding block refining it further and further with 3 different grits ending up at 220.  Then I removed the template, cleaned up the glue and applied 3 coats of poly to each "edge" wiping it down with #00000 steel wool between coats.

 

I have all the numbered and lettered frames assembled, beveled, and poly coated.  The templates for the cant frames have been cut out and applied.  I also got the hawse frames cut out, cleaned up and glued together.  Per the practicum, I'm holding off on beveling the cant and hawse frames until later.  With that said, Chapter 2 is now complete.  Next, we will be moving forward with assembling the keel and jig.  No problems so far - smooth sailing.

 

Total build duration so far:  41.5 hours

 

Mike Shanks

 

 

 

 

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22 hours, 4 sanding sticks, 12 #10 blades, nearly 6 billets of redgum, 243 CNC parts, and 2 cut thumbs later - all 27 frames have been constructed.  Things went a lot better and safer once I started clamping the parts into my Panavise.  My repeatable process was as follows:

 

1.  Print the template and cut out the parts

2.  Trim the tabs and lightly sand every surface of every part (some frames have 9 parts while others have 10)

3.  Test lay-out the parts onto the template to get the orientation and best match for the parts

4.  Apply double-sided tape to the template

5.  Glue the pieces together on the template using the tape to keep the pieces in place

6.  Place a book and some weight on top of the assembled frame.  Allow the glue to dry for at least 30 minutes (I used Weldbond)

7.  Remove weights, remove frame from template, label the frame with a pencil and throw away the used template

8.  Repeat 26 more times!!!

 

Some additional tips:

 

- I used several sharp #10 Xacto blades to carefully trim off the billet tabs from each part

- You might want to use some carving gloves or similar to prevent accidental nicks and cuts

- It's important to pay close attention to the grain of the wood when trimming off the tabs.  It will cut easily in one direction but not the other

- Use your sanding stick to lightly sand every surface of each part.  Some of them have very minor chatter marks from the CNC mill that need to be smoothed out to give the best appearance

 

So far, so good.  No issues at all thus far.  Smooth sailing.  With that out of the way we can move on to beveling all the frames inside and out

 

Total build duration so far:  22 hours

Add a 2a step for me:  Get more band aids.

 

Jeff

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I've cut out and cleaned up the 17 parts that make up the keel.  Make sure you lay your parts out against the plan drawing as I found the keel pieces to be about 1/8" too long.  I easily shortened them up by sanding down the sister joint on both ends by 1/16". (Note:  current and future production runs of this kit have that problem corrected already).  There is a lot more trimming and fitting that needs to be done before the parts can be glued together.  Each of the frames has to be trim fitted and tested into the corresponding notches in the rising wood.

 

Mike Shanks

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As a diversion, I decided to go ahead and assemble the jig.  Basic straight forward construction per the practicum.  I used a variety of machine squares and clamps to make sure everything was true.  The top will not be glued on until the keel has been completed and installed.  I simply have the main keel and frame 9 resting in the jig loosely to ensure everything looks lined up properly.  I also annotated all the frame slots for easy reference later.  The fit appears to be very nice at this point.  Now I will go back to squaring up all those notches in the rising wood and get the keel glued together and installed.  Continuing to move forward ....

 

Mike Shanks

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Edited by mrshanks

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Great progress!  I'm anxious to start my AVS build.  With all the recent problems I've had with my Rattlesnake, it may be time to put her in drydock for a bit and concentrate on a new project.

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I spent a lot of time squaring up the notches in the rising wood and fitting each individual frame to it's designated notch.  I used a sharp #10 xacto and a small file to trim away just a little at a time while testing the fit repeatedly as shown below.  I also cut the rabbit bevels on the keel and rising wood.  After completing all this work, just for the heck of it, I installed the keel, rising wood and most of the frames into the assembly jig just to get an idea of how it's all going to come together.  Keep in mind that I haven't glued anything together yet.  There is a lot of precision in this model - but you will need to take your time shaping each piece as a model of it's own to ensure the best results.
 
Total build duration so far:  56 hours

 
 
Rising wood.  the notches on the left show the part prior to trimming.  The notches on the right reflect the squaring work.
 
 
Clamp the frame in a vise and test fit the corresponding notch in the rising wood.  Trim a little at a time until the fit is precise and snug
 
 
None of these pieces are glued together yet.  Everything is just held together by parts fitment and the jig

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Edited by mrshanks

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Completed assembly of the keel and installed it into the jig.  Everything is looking nice and square.  Don't forget to install the false keel prior to putting the assembly in the jig.  For some added security I applied double-sided tape to the bottom of the jig where the keel lies.  I also installed a screw into the front and rear of the jig and attached a rubber band to add a bit more security for the stern and stem posts.  This is in addition to the zip tie provided in the kit.  It might be a bit overkill but I wanted to be sure the keel remains solid in the jig.  This completes Chapter 3.  Moving on to framing the hull.

 

Total build time so far:  62 hours

 

 

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Only a couple hours work and I already have the first 5 pairs of frames installed with the associated filler pieces beveled and installed.  Nothing is glued yet - I'm going to wait until I have most of the frames installed so that I can double and triple check the lay of the scuppers and oar sweeps to ensure they line up properly.  The oar sweeps are milled directly into the filler block so placement is critical.  I'll make minor adjustments if necessary and then come back around to glue everything in.  The flow of the frames looks real nice at this point.

 

 

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Mike:  Where did you get your angle plates for squaring up the building jig?  Are 2" plates adequate?  I can find them on EBay for $6 apiece.  The price goes up exponentially for larger sizes.

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I used a variety of sizes.  1", 2", 3"..   Got them from Micro-Mark..  You can buy them individually or as a set.  I would give you the link but IE11 won't allow me to copy/paste.  Just search on "Angle Plates".  Their "Steel Machinist Squares" are also very useful.

 

Mike

 

 

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Thanks, Mike.  BTW I had the same problem with copy/paste.  IE and MSW aren't compatible.  I downloaded FireFox and use it when I need to copy and paste in MSW.  That's it.  I doubt you'll use FireFox as your default browser because the advertising (much of it with sound), is constant and unending...even if you're not actively on the Web!

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Yeah, thanks Dave.  I knew its an IE compatibility issue but I recently just built this new PC and am trying to keep it as bare bones as possible.  I used to run Chrome on my old machine.  I also can't seem to caption photos because IE won't allow the placeholder tag to paste into the form.  Oh well.... no biggie really.

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I used to use Firefox almost exclusively, but they have really bunged things up recently. I now use Chrome for all my browsing and it works without a hitch here and for all my browsing.

 

I do not use IE at all.

 

Also, great work on the ship so far, looking good!

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Hey Dave & Brian - I went ahead and installed Chrome.  My future posts should look better going forward.  Thanks.

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I've continued work by slowly refining the fit of the frames to the keel and jig. I now have all of the frames fitted with the exception of the two bow cant frames 10 & 11. I'm really pleased with the fit of the stern frames L, M, N, P. I recommend shaping and fitting these stern frames by slowly removing material a little at a time and testing the fit. Do this over and over and you will eventually get the fit pretty darned close. Final shaping can come later after the ship is removed from the jig and the final bevel sanding takes place. I also spent some time cleaning up the topside of each frame foot in preparation for fitting the keelson a bit further down the road. Nothing at this point has been glued in yet. I won't be gluing any of the frames until I have the basic fit and shape of the ship to where it needs to be. In the meantime, the rubber bands work just fine to hold everything together. Patience is key here.... don't rush.... carefully sand/shape, test the fit, repeat. I've gone through all the frames at least twice now and plan another round before gluing.

 

Mike

 

Total build duration so far:  87 hours

 

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